Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Wondered how many of the courses the offer you need to do before you can get involved in advocacy and advice. Was thinking of doing it while I'm doing my GDL 2nd year p/t. Can't do FRU as I'm not in London.

    Any advice/comments welcome

    thanks
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I thought about it, but when I went to interview they made me committ to 10 weeks of 8 hours/week training followed by a minimum of 3 months if 8 hours/week working; which was way too much.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Cheers TWW - that's not very realistic for many people is it. Its pretty tricky to get any advocacy experience outside of FRU it seems to me - I was hoping CAB might be an option but not with those hours.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I did the training while I was at Uni. I went in one day per week (10am-2pm) which wasn't too onerous since I had that day free anyway. The particular bureau I was at was very small and didn't have the resources for tribunal representation etc, so I dealt with general advice work only.

    As for the training, I had to complete a series of 'study packs', which aren't difficult. You also have to attend a course which I think was 2 days, but I could be wrong. I did that locally but I know they are sometimes some distance away from your bureau. They should provide you with travelling expenses to attend. Then you are into advising clients. You have to complete a couple more study packs and have an observed interview.

    In my case, while I stayed at the bureau for quite a while I never got so far as the observed interview and so I remained a trainee advisor. This was due to the disorganisation of the training programme rather than any reluctance on my part =/ Eventually I left because I became disillusioned with my particular bureau. The organisation was dreadful and I felt I got very little thanks for all the hours I put in.

    But more than that I felt that the interests of Citizen's Advice took much more precedence than the interests of clients. For example, in my bureau we had certain targets we had to hit to secure funding. A certain percentage of our clients had to be referred to the CLS helpline. This meant that clients who came in on a relatively simple matter were referred to the CLS simply in order for us to hit our targets, regardless of the fact that it meant they were in the bureau for an extra 2 hours. In the end I felt I was being forced to give clients incorrect or unhelpful advice, which I wasn't happy to do.

    I must make clear this was a fault with the bureau I attended. I still think Citizen's Advice do a good job generally. the problem was that the bureau was so small it was constantly struggling for survival and I realise they simply would not get funded if they didn't hit the targets they were given. But I didn't feel I could work like that. I would consider volunteering again because I did enjoy it. But I would work for a larger bureau to minimise the risk of the same degree of pressure being placed upon me again.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks V - that's another nail in the CAB adviser coffin for me! I am pretty heavily involved in the Innocence Project, so I'm not convinced I could spare the time for all that training really. Just wanted some advocacy experience, as Innocence is all (very interesting and sharp end) case work and appeal prep.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Guys,where a law student can look for some advocacy experience apart from the CAB ?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You could try looking at mackenzie friending, which although not advocacy is relevant court experience.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FMQ)
    You could try looking at mackenzie friending, which although not advocacy is relevant court experience.

    Thanks man!!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FMQ)
    You could try looking at mackenzie friending, which although not advocacy is relevant court experience.

    Do you have any contact details for the Mackenzie friends? When I click on "contact us" nothing comes up.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by theanalyst)
    Thanks V - that's another nail in the CAB adviser coffin for me! I am pretty heavily involved in the Innocence Project, so I'm not convinced I could spare the time for all that training really. Just wanted some advocacy experience, as Innocence is all (very interesting and sharp end) case work and appeal prep.
    You must be from London; was looking for the Innocence project in Leeds,but no sign of it It would suit perfectly my profile as I would like to be a family solicitor ; any ideas where else I could look for any family-oriented legal experience?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.