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    Hi, Ive been looking at universities to apply for, in particular for those that would be good for a joint degree in History and English. There doesn't seem to be much on these forums on a joint degree in those two subjects but on looking at (very dodgy) league tables and various research ive got a good idea of the places I would be interested in applying to. Anyway I was just wondering, since I don't want to do Law at Uni as a degree, if I was interested in going into Law I would have to take a year conversion course adding an extra year post - degree. Now how useful would it be to do a Masters in my joint degree before taking the conversion and how would I be affected by the extra year spent doing a degree at a Scottish Uni before spending another year converting? So basically I could potentially, in an English uni, be spending 3 years for my degree, 2 more for a masters, 1 for the conversion which is 6 years compared to 4 at a scottish uni, 1 or 2 more for a mlitt?, and then another for a conversion. This would mean I would be looking at being 24/25/26 before I finish. Is this clever? I was just wondering if any of you guys had any advice on this.

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    You are thinking of doing a masters...before you have even applied?
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    Hi, Ive been looking at universities to apply for, in particular for those that would be good for a joint degree in History and English. There doesn't seem to be much on these forums on a joint degree in those two subjects but on looking at (very dodgy) league tables and various research ive got a good idea of the places I would be interested in applying to. Anyway I was just wondering, since I don't want to do Law at Uni as a degree, if I was interested in going into Law I would have to take a year conversion course adding an extra year post - degree. Now how useful would it be to do a Masters in my joint degree before taking the conversion and how would I be affected by the extra year spent doing a degree at a Scottish Uni before spending another year converting? So basically I could potentially, in an English uni, be spending 3 years for my degree, 2 more for a masters, 1 for the conversion which is 6 years compared to 4 at a scottish uni, 1 or 2 more for a mlitt?, and then another for a conversion. This would mean I would be looking at being 24/25/26 before I finish. Is this clever? I was just wondering if any of you guys had any advice on this.

    Thanks
    A masters won't help you in either getting into the conversion course or gaining a traineeship after it, so I wouldn't bother with the extra year. Some let you skip first year if you have good enough grades- so it would actually be three years, and the fees are lower in Scotland, so it could potentially be not a bad idea- most Scottish degrees are pretty flexible so a joint degree in that will not be a problem. There's plenty of places in England that offer similar things though.
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    Anyway I was just wondering, since I don't want to do Law at Uni as a degree, if I was interested in going into Law I would have to take a year conversion course adding an extra year post - degree. Now how useful would it be to do a Masters in my joint degree before taking the conversion and how would I be affected by the extra year spent doing a degree at a Scottish Uni before spending another year converting? So basically I could potentially, in an English uni, be spending 3 years for my degree, 2 more for a masters, 1 for the conversion which is 6 years compared to 4 at a scottish uni, 1 or 2 more for a mlitt?, and then another for a conversion. This would mean I would be looking at being 24/25/26 before I finish. Is this clever? I was just wondering if any of you guys had any advice on this.

    Thanks
    I ditto the advice above, and would also add that it's not even worth thinking about what you are going to do after your degree in this much detail. You have absolutely no idea how you will feel about history, english, or law after three or four years of studying it, and of living independently, and becoming an adult. Bear in a mind that an MA in english or history isn't going to help for getting you onto a law conversion course - your degree will be sufficient for this, and MAs are expensive and hard work. It's good to think about what you might want to do in the future, but I would not get down to worrying about what age you are going to be when you finish, because you really have no idea you will still want to do the things you are wanting to do by the time you finish your degree. Do well in your history and english degree - if you find you love your subject enough to want to do an MA in it, then do that (it would seem a waste of time and money to do it if you were set on studying law, however). Or you could go straight to the law conversion (there are plenty of professional loans you can get to help you out there - funding for the MA is much more competitive and extremely difficult to get hold off, especially for english/history). But like I say, just go to uni, work hard and have a good time. Start thinking about these things in your second year
 
 
 
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