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why is everyone so panicky (is that a word?) about work exp? Watch

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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    they do. but there is no requirement to even get within 100 yards of a doctor. you know they'd rather have someone committed to a centre for adults with learning disabilities (or similar), where the work wasn't always especially glamorous than someone whose spent a week shadowing uncle Paul the eminent Neurosurgeon who learns nothing or little of hard work.
    They actually prefer a combination of the 2 (for obvious reasons)

    Whilst experience in a clinical setting isn't necessarily required by universities, a very large proportion of medical applicants will have it anyway - and the benefits of undertaking such work experience are apparent when you are invited to an interview (and even just to give you a relatively realistic glimpse of the career in which you intend to spend the rest of your working life)
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    they do. but there is no requirement to even get within 100 yards of a doctor. you know they'd rather have someone committed to a centre for adults with learning disabilities (or similar), where the work wasn't always especially glamorous than someone whose spent a week shadowing uncle Paul the eminent Neurosurgeon who learns nothing or little of hard work.

    Yes but to be honest most applicants have both? So saying you should only work in a caring environment is like saying well you could only have one leg. Yes you could survive but to be honest you're not going to be winning any races anytime soon.

    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    Yes but to be honest most applicants have both? So saying you should only work in a caring environment is like saying well you could only have one leg. Yes you could survive but to be honest you're not going to be winning any races anytime soon.

    :rolleyes:
    Hello potential medical applicant, thank you for your unqualified advice and unsupported factual assertions. Please continue to make it up as you go along, and please, let me know how application goes for you.
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    they do. but there is no requirement to even get within 100 yards of a doctor. you know they'd rather have someone committed to a centre for adults with learning disabilities (or similar), where the work wasn't always especially glamorous than someone whose spent a week shadowing uncle Paul the eminent Neurosurgeon who learns nothing or little of hard work.
    I thought the aim of work experience was to learn what the role of a doctor involves - now dont get me wrong, i think working in a caring setting is valuable. but how exactly will applicants learn what doctors do if they spend their time wiping bums or serving tea to old people rather that actually seeing/talking to doctors?

    And dont have a go at ignoramus because she's an applicant rather than a medic. they werent giving out misinformation. It would be better if an applicant has some experience in a clinical setting, but universities know that it sometimes isnt possible so some caring work is better than no experience at all.
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Hello potential medical applicant, thank you for your unqualified advice and unsupported factual assertions. Please continue to make it up as you go along, and please, let me know how application goes for you.
    whats up your arse, stop biting peoples head off
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    (Original post by dances_with_lamposts)
    I thought the aim of work experience was to learn what the role of a doctor involves - now dont get me wrong, i think working in a caring setting is valuable. but how exactly will applicants learn what doctors do if they spend their time wiping bums or serving tea to old people rather that actually seeing/talking to doctors?
    You need to read my first post, and in case you don't feel like reading in between the lines - all work experience is equally useless RE learning the realities of medicine. I would wager that the number of a) applicants who have a crisis of ambition and decide not to do medicine after a gruelling week of shadowing a consultant in a large teaching hospital (almost invariably through family connections) and b) Doctors who, upon learning the realities of medicine were surprised that it involved highly intellectual work and a excellent command of countless complex concepts thought "Damn, and my work experience wiping bottoms never showed me this aspect!" are both similar and near zero. The only thing that is going to give you a grasp of the realities of medicine, is being a doctor.

    You need to have some form of work experience, but infinitely more importantly you need to be able to spin it in the way the school you are applying to wants to hear.
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    Lmao, the medicine forum is quite a funny place, mainly because you always start fighting amongst each other. :p:
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    You need to read my first post, and in case you don't feel like reading in between the lines - all work experience is equally useless RE learning the realities of medicine. I would wager that the number of a) applicants who have a crisis of ambition and decide not to do medicine after a gruelling week of shadowing a consultant in a large teaching hospital (almost invariably through family connections) and b) Doctors who, upon learning the realities of medicine were surprised that it involved highly intellectual work and a excellent command of countless complex concepts thought "Damn, and my work experience wiping bottoms never showed me this aspect!" are both similar and near zero. The only thing that is going to give you a grasp of the realities of medicine, is being a doctor.

    You need to have some form of work experience, but infinitely more importantly you need to be able to spin it in the way the school you are applying to wants to hear.
    yeah, i read your first post, you got lucky i guess. some people do! you got in because you can speak nhs jargon, and that probably impressed the interviewers enough, but it doesnt give you any more of an idea of what a doctor does.

    I understand that the closest thing you can do to understanding a doctor's role is to actually be a doctor, but thats pretty difficult for most applicants so im betting that the next best thing is talking to doctors and asking them about their work, not selling junk at oxfam (unless you're selling it to a doctor and you can ask them about their job!! ).

    and im gonna echo what clad in armour said - what's up your arse? there's no need to get pissy with the applicants.
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    (Original post by clad in armour)
    whats up your arse, stop biting peoples head off
    Hi.
    Fortunately for both of us there is a protocol to follow in scenarios like these. Just follow the below instructions and we will be halfway there to sorting this whole mess out.
    Are you;
    a) A medical student or an 09 applicant currently holding an offer?
    b) A 2010 applicant
    c) An uninvolved party with some personal knowledge of the medical applications process.
    d) A lay person

    Now follow the instruction that correlates with your chosen answer
    a) Take no further action
    b) Continue to post what you know to be true because it's, like, totally obvious that you aren't getting in unless you are the captain of the the Hockey team and have at least 3000 hours of Surgical experience
    c) Post what you totally heard, even if you can't remember where you did. But it's still totally legit.
    d) Inexplicably lurk in medical application threads and make useless comments.

    Thank you for participating in the government's new protocol for these incidents.
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Hi.
    Fortunately for both of us there is a protocol to follow in scenarios like these. Just follow the below instructions and we will be halfway there to sorting this whole mess out.
    Are you;
    a) A medical student or an 09 applicant currently holding an offer?
    b) A 2010 applicant
    c) An uninvolved party with some personal knowledge of the medical applications process.
    d) A lay person

    Now follow the instruction that correlates with your chosen answer
    a) Take no further action
    b) Continue to post what you know to be true because it's, like, totally obvious that you aren't getting in unless you are the captain of the the Hockey team and have at least 3000 hours of Surgical experience
    c) Post what you totally heard, even if you can't remember where you did. But it's still totally legit.
    d) Inexplicably lurk in medical application threads and make useless comments.

    Thank you for participating in the government's new protocol for these incidents.
    have you got pms or something??
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    (Original post by dances_with_lamposts)
    have you got pms or something??
    HAHA I get it. PMS? Like a woman can get right? Good one
    :yes:
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    Wow, grouchy much. If sidewalkwhenshewalks ever were to become my doctor, I'd rather suffer in pain. She'd probably demean all her patients with that sarcasm. :eek:
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    (Original post by Boo.)
    Wow, grouchy much. If sidewalkwhenshewalks ever were to become my doctor, I'd rather suffer in pain. She'd probably demean all her patients with that sarcasm. :eek:
    I'd demean you too, now bore on troll.
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    they do. but there is no requirement to even get within 100 yards of a doctor. you know they'd rather have someone committed to a centre for adults with learning disabilities (or similar), where the work wasn't always especially glamorous than someone whose spent a week shadowing uncle Paul the eminent Neurosurgeon who learns nothing or little of hard work.
    It is somewhat difficult to get an insight into the rigors of a career of a doctor if you don't get within 100 yards of one! :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I'd demean you too, now bore on troll.
    Okay, that's nice.
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    (Original post by Boo.)
    Okay, that's nice.
    What did you expect? Did you want to join a discussion by insulting people and expect to be liked for it? You're an idiot.

    Now, since you clearly have nothing to add to this discussion, wander back to wherever you came from.
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    (Original post by Ataloss)
    It is somewhat difficult to get an insight into the rigors of a career of a doctor if you don't get within 100 yards of one! :rolleyes:
    :sigh:
    but after a week of following one around I totally got it!
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    (Original post by Boo.)
    Wow, grouchy much. If sidewalkwhenshewalks ever were to become my doctor, I'd rather suffer in pain. She'd probably demean all her patients with that sarcasm. :eek:
    OK I don't know if all this 'she' business is intentional
    but
    I'M MALE
    and as on my screen I am displaying the male symbol

    or was it a hilarious joke?
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    :sigh:
    but after a week of following one around I totally got it!
    :facepalm:

    The word I used purposely was insight.

    I agree with the suggestion that there is much to be gained from caring for people in a variety of health care settings. However, that is completely different to gaining an insight into the rigors of medicine for which you actually need to have to contact with a doctor.

    However, to use you're own argument - you're a potential medical student so you must know the answers. :rolleyes:
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    I think for potential applicants shadow work experience is the closest you'll get to doctors and FY1s, that's why everyone frets about needing it. And then there's the teachers in charge of medical applicants that go on and on..
 
 
 
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