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    (Original post by NW86)
    I'm afraid that is simply not true. as has been said numerous times in this discussion the university rarely matters. People who are yet to graduate are led to believe this by parents and teachers who want their children/students to go to more prestigious universities. Once you have graduated and gone through recruitment processes and spoken to recruiters you will realise that even a 2:1 is really all you need, and that is only to get your foot in the door as it were, to prove you are capable of working. Then it relies heavily on your extra-curricular skills, your cv, work experience and, although people don't like to admit it, personality. And before you criticse me for not knowing about archaeology, i studied art history, anthropology and archaeology at uni.
    And there's me thinking it was people who didn't like to admit that the university DID matter. Where did you study Art History/Anthro/Arch?
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    And there's me thinking it was people who didn't like to admit that the university DID matter. Where did you study Art History/Anthro/Arch?
    at a uni much worse than manchester. UEA. And I'm a management consultant with the big four now, goes to show eh. lol
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    No. Getting the right number of ucas points (ranges between 300 and 360) and a 2.1 is the most important thing for most graduate jobs.
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    Most employers do not look really consider the University, but the grade. It is like saying because you got 4 A's t the best private school in England, you are better than the person who recieved 4 A's at a lower acheiveing six form. In my opinion, the person who recieved a first honours degree from a rank 20 university in Medicine should be respected equally if not more than someone who recieved the same qualification and grade and who went to oxford university, because statistically the lower rank institute have lower percentage of people obtaining a first degree.
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Is everyone serious when they say it doesn't matter? Why would students even bother trying to get into the 'best' university they can if this was the case? Obviously, it depends on what kind of industry you're going into, but if, say, I wanted to go into Forensic Archaeology as a career (which I do), a 2:1 from Manchester would put me at an extreme advantage over someone who got a 2:1 from an ex-poly (can't think of one that does Archaeology off the top of my head!) It's a bloody hard field to get into, why would I not want to do the best I could to increase my chances of getting in, because even then there's no guarantee!!!
    because there is better standard teaching meaning there is more of the higher grades at oxford than at a lower uni
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    (Original post by NW86)
    at a uni much worse than manchester. UEA. And I'm a management consultant with the big four now, goes to show eh. lol
    Right err...that's scary! Too much power, too much money. Not something I'd want to be part of, personally.

    Thing is, your career no has nothing to do with the degree you studied, so I imagine the grade was more important than the course or university - I understand that...but if you're looking to go into a career strongly related to your degree, why does the university not matter? It might be renowned for that particular subject in funding, facilities, teaching...
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Right err...that's scary! Too much power, too much money. Not something I'd want to be part of, personally.

    Thing is, your career no has nothing to do with the degree you studied, so I imagine the grade was more important than the course or university - I understand that...but if you're looking to go into a career strongly related to your degree, why does the university not matter?
    it just doesn't. wait until you start applying for internships - you will find out prestige of university doesnt matter.
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Is everyone serious when they say it doesn't matter? Why would students even bother trying to get into the 'best' university they can if this was the case? Obviously, it depends on what kind of industry you're going into, but if, say, I wanted to go into Forensic Archaeology as a career (which I do), a 2:1 from Manchester would put me at an extreme advantage over someone who got a 2:1 from an ex-poly (can't think of one that does Archaeology off the top of my head!) It's a bloody hard field to get into, why would I not want to do the best I could to increase my chances of getting in, because even then there's no guarantee!!!
    Years and years of tradition are the reason for these misconceptions, perpetuated every year when so many naive individuals who've worked for their high grades then make little effort with research and reach as high up the league tables as they can. Things continue this way, year after year (but more and more now, people are going against that and doing their own research, so it may not be this way forever).

    Parents further this behaviour by wanting their children to go to a prestigious university - most would love to say 'My daughter's an Oxford graduate', and again, many of the same students that blindly follow university league tables will be the same students that let Mum and Dad influence their 'decision'.

    The key, as others have said, is to have the right personality and the right experience (proven by grades or otherwise). Go to Manchester and spend all of your time studying so that you come out with a 1st, and you've got a good degree behind you for the future; but someone who went to UCLan (chosen for no reason other than that it's my old university) and got a 2:1 alongside many other experiences and a part-time job may have much more to give - particularly if their modules have been more relevant for the specific role you're both applying for.
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    Lol well I got in a fight with someonee about how glasgow university is mils better than Stirling. I said for philosophy it isn't. He continued to disagree. I said Stirling is second to only St Andrews for philosophy in Scotland. He said the university I am going to is crap and I was an idiot for turning down Glasgow.

    This story's relevance? People let snobbery get in front of the facts, if the oxford degree is a crap degree and the other person got a first or did a masters then they are more likely to be taken into consideration as it shows they can work hard and do well.
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    (Original post by milner001)
    because there is better standard teaching meaning there is more of the higher grades at oxford than at a lower uni
    This.

    Depending on what you're trying to use it for it'll be your degree classification or your course content that gets looked at first. The times I've been asked about my institution seemed to mainly be opportunities for the interviewer to ask "oh, do you know so-and-so who teaches whatever-studies?".
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Right err...that's scary! Too much power, too much money. Not something I'd want to be part of, personally.

    Thing is, your career no has nothing to do with the degree you studied, so I imagine the grade was more important than the course or university - I understand that...but if you're looking to go into a career strongly related to your degree, why does the university not matter? It might be renowned for that particular subject in funding, facilities, teaching...
    too much money??? interesting idea hehe.

    Well i would say in the case of a renowned uni it is different, but not many really are, not to the extent where a specific uni would get you a job. I would say the reason it continues to not make a difference is due to the fact that uni modules differ from place to place and that you would still have to be taught many of the skills needed to effectivley do the job while in the workplace, or at least the processes that a certain company/group uses; the theories of a subject and the actuality of work within a field can often be quite different. This again drops students onto a level-pegging, unless of course the university course offers actual experience on a dig site or experience in a certain field, but then this again comes down to work-experience as i originally said, you are learning skills in the work environment that the uni is not teaching you, and these can be accessed by anybody who is lucky enough to get a placement, not just people at a specific uni. I'm not saying you should drop manchester in favour of de montfort though

    edit: typo and clarity. was a bit of a ramble... still is i think
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Years and years of tradition are the reason for these misconceptions, perpetuated every year when so many naive individuals who've worked for their high grades then make little effort with research and reach as high up the league tables as they can. Things continue this way, year after year (but more and more now, people are going against that and doing their own research, so it may not be this way forever).

    Parents further this behaviour by wanting their children to go to a prestigious university - most would love to say 'My daughter's an Oxford graduate', and again, many of the same students that blindly follow university league tables will be the same students that let Mum and Dad influence their 'decision'.

    The key, as others have said, is to have the right personality and the right experience (proven by grades or otherwise). Go to Manchester and spend all of your time studying so that you come out with a 1st, and you've got a good degree behind you for the future; but someone who went to UCLan (chosen for no reason other than that it's my old university) and got a 2:1 alongside many other experiences and a part-time job may have much more to give - particularly if their modules have been more relevant for the specific role you're both applying for.
    Actually, I'm doing voluntary field experience in the autumn and getting a part time job because I'm poor, aiming for a 2:1 because I'd quite like to still have a life at uni...I'm not personally relying on Manchester to get me where I want to be, I was just under the impression that it would help never mind
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Actually, I'm doing voluntary field experience in the autumn and getting a part time job because I'm poor, aiming for a 2:1 because I'd quite like to still have a life at uni...I'm not personally relying on Manchester to get me where I want to be, I was just under the impression that it would help never mind
    your 2:1 will help, your voluntary field experience will definitely help, dont make a sad face
    and just think, puts you on a level playing field with the oxbridge chaps
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    Having seen the Physics syllabuses for Cambridge and a low ranking uni (not going to name names sincee i dont want to offend anyone) and studied the subject myself at another uni I have to admit they are very different. Most of the stuff they do in their final year at Cambridge didnt even get touched on

    So if you had a 2:1 from both unis it would be reasonable to assume that the Cambridge graduate worked alot harder or was a fair bit better at Physics. I know alot of people think that shouldnt be the case but unfortunately it is.
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Actually, I'm doing voluntary field experience in the autumn and getting a part time job because I'm poor, aiming for a 2:1 because I'd quite like to still have a life at uni...I'm not personally relying on Manchester to get me where I want to be, I was just under the impression that it would help never mind
    If someone else with an identical personality and life to you applied for a job, and if you had both done a degree that gave you identical experience, rather than having different modules, but they were at UCLan and you were at Manchester, then yes, your degree may give you a slight advantage. There are too many variables, though; no two people are ever identical in every way and there's every chance that someone else will have a slight something you don't. Still, you sound like you have absolutely everything planned out - with voluntary work experience, a part-time job and an active university life, you can do very little else to put yourself in the best position possible.
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    (Original post by ScotlandStandUp)
    Would you say that Bob doing X degree at Oxford is in "far" a better position than John doing X degree at '500th best university in the world', or is the person the most important thing in the case of a job interview?

    In other worlds would Bob benefit more than John simply because of where he got his degree from?
    In my view, there is no need to ask such question because about 40,000 students are studying at Oxford and Cambridge and I am sure the number of students going to University in the UK, EU and world is sharply higher.

    In all probability, you and a graduate from Oxford or Cambridge will not apply for the same job to the same company. Do not worry. :p: The (British) economy does not depend on Oxford or Cambridge!
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    If someone else with an identical personality and life to you applied for a job, and if you had both done a degree that gave you identical experience, rather than having different modules, but they were at UCLan and you were at Manchester, then yes, your degree may give you a slight advantage. There are too many variables, though; no two people are ever identical in every way and there's every chance that someone else will have a slight something you don't. Still, you sound like you have absolutely everything planned out - with voluntary work experience, a part-time job and an active university life, you can do very little else to put yourself in the best position possible.
    Thanks for your input and advice
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    aiming for a 2:1 because I'd quite like to still have a life at uni
    Saying first class honours degrees are only for people who don't have a life is usually something people save until after they've got a 2:1. Aim high, anyone can do it .
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    Saying first class honours degrees are only for people who don't have a life is usually something people save until after they've got a 2:1. Aim high, anyone can do it .
    Haha, no I just know a few people who have Firsts, but they probably have the kind of personalities that repel social life anyway!
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    (Original post by ScotlandStandUp)
    Would you say that Bob doing X degree at Oxford is in "far" a better position than John doing X degree at '500th best university in the world', or is the person the most important thing in the case of a job interview?

    In other worlds would Bob benefit more than John simply because of where he got his degree from?
    No, it's not just the University it's the degree classification and the Univeristy put togeather.

    If bob gets a good degree from Oxford (a First or a 2;1) then it will be more beneficial than johns degree from '500th best university in the world'.

    If bob gets a poor degree from Oxford (2;2 or lower) then it will give him minimal benefit and johns degree from '500th best university in the world' will be more beneficial.
 
 
 
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