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    (Original post by XCRUSHESX)
    But they are just using the pattern of last year to predict that 130,000 will lose their place, so it isn't certain that 130,000 will go into clearing



    Stress on could!
    Yeah, we don't want to get too caught up in numbers or statistics. Moreso ones about swine flu, but this as well. :p:
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    (Original post by Moroseblight)
    I was one of those students last year. Got my 3 A's and had no offers. I was so tired of the UCAS system that I didn't bother with clearing. So I said hello a gap year, but then the recession happened

    Those graduate job figures should improve slightly by the time we graduate, hopefully. If not, here's to an insane amount of work experience and networking!
    Ouch. What did you apply for?
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    (Original post by piiineapple)
    labour...
    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Yep :mad: NEW Labour. How I seethe.
    What has this got to do with labour at all?
    It's not like Gordon Brown has told universities to accept less people, is it? The problem is that more people are applying than expected, so of course some people are going to be disappointed. The article specifically mentions that many more mature students have applied this year - what would you have labour do about that? Say that people over 19 can't apply to go to University?

    Stop blaming the current gov't for your own failure to get in to higher education.

    (Original post by Moroseblight)
    I was one of those students last year. Got my 3 A's and had no offers. I was so tired of the UCAS system that I didn't bother with clearing. So I said hello a gap year, but then the recession happened :rolleyes:
    I think there's more to the story than meets the eye here. Either you did crappy A-levels, wrote a poor PS (personal statement) or applied to the wrong unviersities for your abilities. Heaps of people get uni places with a lot less than AAA at A-level , so if you got AAA and didn't get a place it's not the systems fault, it's not the gov't fault, it's more than likely your fault for the reasons listed above. There are heaps of unis people get in to with less than AAA, what makes your case so special?
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    What has this got to do with labour at all?
    It's not like Gordon Brown has told universities to accept less people, is it? The problem is that more people are applying than expected, so of course some people are going to be disappointed. The article specifically mentions that many more mature students have applied this year - what would you have labour do about that? Say that people over 19 can't apply to go to University?

    Stop blaming the current gov't for your own failure to get in to higher education.
    The point about the Government is, they haven't been prescient (they're incapable of it) - they haven't been able to help safeguard these hardworking student's futures like they should have done. The fact that more people are applying to university every year isn't some kind of shock to Labour, it was an inevitability. I'm not about to suggest what the Government could do to change this because that's their job.

    You really don't believe that students with 3 As can possibly be rejected? There are so many underlying factors, mainly oversubscription of courses, that lead to this happening. Students who don't do as well in their A-Levels get in because they're applying to different universities with lower entry requirements, not because people are just letting them in anyway!
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    Thank god I wasn't born a year later. Things are a lot more difficult this year than they were last year...
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    good thing i got through clearing fast :o:
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    You really don't believe that students with 3 As can possibly be rejected? There are so many underlying factors, mainly oversubscription of courses, that lead to this happening. Students who don't do as well in their A-Levels get in because they're applying to different universities with lower entry requirements, not because people are just letting them in anyway!
    My point is that if you get AAA and apply to 5 unis and they all reject you, it's not "OMG LABOURS" fault, there's probably some underlying problem with you that is causing you to get rejected.

    The fact that someone who got AAA didn't get in to any of their choices is not labours fault - it is that individuals fault. Almost all the unis in the top ten unis in the UK will accept people with AAB for some of their courses.

    I suspect the person who got AAA and got rejected either i) did soft A-levels , ii) had a terrible personal statement. iii) applied to universities/courses too tough for them or iv) performed very poorly at interview.

    None of these problems are anything to do with labour. My point is that whining about labour being terrible is not an excuse for one person failing to get in to university despite their (apparently) good A-levels.

    politics forum is over there though, if you want to discuss this further with someone who actually cares.

    edit: to answer your point about over subscription being a factor, yes that's true, but a student with AAA in good A-levels and a good personal statement would certainly get offers from some universities if they applied to a range of sensible universities (ie some ambitious ones and at least one backup). If the girl above didn't get offers I'd lean towards it being her fault rather than the fault of a certain Mr. Brown.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    My point is that if you get AAA and apply to 5 unis and they all reject you, it's not "OMG LABOURS" fault, there's probably some underlying problem with you that is causing you to get rejected.

    The fact that someone who got AAA didn't get in to any of their choices is not labours fault - it is that individuals fault. Almost all the unis in the top ten unis in the UK will accept people with AAB for some of their courses.

    I suspect the person who got AAA and got rejected either i) did soft A-levels , ii) had a terrible personal statement. iii) applied to universities/courses too tough for them or iv) performed very poorly at interview.

    None of these problems are anything to do with labour. My point is that whining about labour being terrible is not an excuse for one person failing to get in to university despite their (apparently) good A-levels.

    politics forum is over there though, if you want to discuss this further with someone who actually cares.

    You care enough to write all that, you just can't handle someone having a differing opinion to you!
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    May get a gap year after all then :/
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    You care enough to write all that, you just can't handle someone having a differing opinion to you!
    I don't particular care for politics, nor do I know much about it. However, I do know that "it's labours fault!" is not the generic solution to any problem.

    In fact I do enjoy people having different opinions to me, meeting people with different opinions is a good way to learn! If we were all the same it would be no fun, right? If we all had terrible A-levels and then dropped out of uni after 3 months then was unemployed for almost two years it would be no fun, right? Nothing would get done!
    So it's a good job some of us have different opinions and different thoughts on education, for sure.

    But back on topic - only Moroseblight can shed light on her A-level situation, but I'd certainly be interested to hear her thoughts as to why she got rejected.
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    Aren't we at a point of population boom or something silly - that there were more babies born 18/19 years ago than 21 or 16? I think I read that in an article on the matter which implied the situation may not be so bad in a few years time because there will be less people aged 18/19 to apply.

    This news is bound to make people worry even more. I'd recommend checking the clearing lists as soon as you can and/or buying the Independant before you get your results. I checked the lists and picked out two courses wanting BCC or less [they happened to be at Nottingham and Bangor] and took the details and phone numbers with me so I could call up immediately if things didn't go well.

    Good luck to everyone waiting for their results - try to enjoy the next few weeks though otherwise worry will drive you mad. [I had a holiday for the fortnight before results which helped keep it off my mind last year].
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    (Original post by Moroseblight)
    Meh. Such is life. And those graduate job figures are alarming.
    That graduate job figure is misleading. It implies that there are (for example) 400,000 graduates but only 10,000 jobs. Which just isn't true.

    The actual statistic is that for every job there are 40 applicants which is something completely different. It will only imply the prior statement if each applicant was only applying for one job which obviously isn't true.

    Say there were 40 graduates and 40 jobs, and each applicant applied for all 40 jobs available. Then you'd end up with the same statistic (40 apps per job) but everyone would still get a job.
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    That's higher education! Not everyone can get in. And isn't this the actual point of applying to uni? Trying to get a place rather than being guaranteed one?

    Tbh, if you really want to go to uni, or more specifically the uni/course you want to go to, you'd work hard for it. If you miss your grades - tough luck. And don't give me this business about 1 or 2 UMS - there has to be a cut-off point somewhere, and I'm sorry to say, you missed it!

    Seems these days AAA doesn't cut it. And why should it? Apparently loads of people get AAA and AAB. Getting AAA =/= offer. As people said on this forum "grades don't mean everything".

    You have to impress to get the offer. Not just stick through A-level and hope you haven't failed one of them.

    This is reality!
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    (Original post by Atrixa)
    As if I wasn't worried enough...
    This.

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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    What has this got to do with labour at all?
    It's not like Gordon Brown has told universities to accept less people, is it? The problem is that more people are applying than expected, so of course some people are going to be disappointed.
    You are forgetting that it is Labour's deeply-flawed policy that 50% of school leavers go to university, so the numbers experienced now should have been planned for, never mind expected.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You are forgetting that it is Labour's deeply-flawed policy that 50% of school leavers go to university, so the numbers experienced now should have been planned for, never mind expected.
    Why, then, does the article make a special mention of mature and overseas students:

    (Original post by article)
    Part of the increase in applications comes from mature students, with a rise of more than 18.8 per cent from those aged over 25. There has also been an increase in demand from students in other European Union countries. These students are funded in the same way as British students and count towards universities' student quotas.
    If it was simply 50% of school leavers going, then I could see some blame being shifted on to labour - but it seems that mature and overseas students have risen significantly.


    Even so, my point remains that it is not labours fault that people with AAA are getting rejected. Blaming the gov't for you not getting in to university is as bad as the now infamous "damn mexicans stealing our jobs" excuse of low skilled Americans.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    If it was simply 50% of school leavers going, then I could see some blame being shifted on to labour - but it seems that mature and overseas students have risen significantly.

    Even so, my point remains that it is not labours fault that people with AAA are getting rejected.
    If your policy is that 50% of school-leavers should go to university, you'd provide more places than that, wouldn't you, to cope with mature students? As it is, there aren't even enough places for 50% of school-leavers.

    Labour has presided over 12 years of rampant grade inflation in a self-congratulatory manner, neglecting the point that the A level is no longer fit for purpose.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    What has this got to do with labour at all?
    It's not like Gordon Brown has told universities to accept less people, is it? The problem is that more people are applying than expected, so of course some people are going to be disappointed. The article specifically mentions that many more mature students have applied this year - what would you have labour do about that? Say that people over 19 can't apply to go to University?

    Stop blaming the current gov't for your own failure to get in to higher education.
    M_E_X I think you are missing the point. In the last 12 years Labour have been pushing for up to 50% of school students to attend university. They have been doing this to win votes, without thinking of the consequences. These are:

    - Over populated higher education industry which has led overtime to degree inflation.

    - Underfunded higher education industry which is now the reason why we pay student tuition fees. These fees quite literally 'top-up' the funding universities in the UK receive in order to allow them to teach to a decent standard. In the recession this crack has turned into a huge crevasse and you can now see unis cutting down contact teaching time in favour of putting their content online (as it costs them far less in teaching costs). Which is not what we pay fees for.

    - Universities are now subject to extreme political pressure, which threatens to compromise their academic reputations - look at the blanket formulas universities are being asked to apply to applications from next year (see timesonline.com website right now - leading headline).

    - An increase in Mickey Mouse degree from poor universities which will not increase a graduates employability but instead will just plough them into critical amounts of debt.

    - The 'university' model shifting from an academic institution, into a plain money making business, as universities compete to say they have the newest buildings, best equipment etc, as the teaching quality at these universities decreases as professors spend less time teaching, and more time 'researching' - because that is what Labour base their funding allocation on. Whilst the logic is understandable for the outside world, for students - the future generation of doctors, lawyers, engineers, indeed, politicians - they are being failed and not being given the best framework in which to maximise their potential.

    - A saturated graduate job market, as there are far more graduates than degree based jobs. This leads to some brilliantly intellectual students failing to get jobs.

    - On another point, the massively supportive and lenient welfare-state now allows people to literally live off the state, not be supported by them in times of need like it was originally foreseen when it was invented. This, compared with the many honest graduates in obscene amounts of debt with no job, does seem unfair. Perhaps 'if they try hard enough to find a job they will', but when the politicians leading us went to university, they didn't pay a penny - full grants. Also, the universities were not constrained by politicians telling them who they should accept and who they shouldn't, so they took the most able students, and society benefited.

    As you can see, these issues are not a result of universities. They are symptomatic, and a direct result of, Labour's poorly thought out education policy over the last 12 years, with little or no regard shown for the potential social and economic issues massive scale university education would lead to.
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    thanks for worrying us even more than we already were..!
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    ps. I got rejected from Bristol with AAA in History, Politics and Maths, an A at AS Business Studies and 3 A*s 5 As and 2 Bs, and 20 in my LNAT (the average is 16 - and that is of the people applying to some of the top law schools). They cited my rejected as 'other personal factors and increased competition this year.'. If you want to say my personal statement was poor I'm happy to put in on here for you all the read, because I'm confident it's fine. The reason I was not accepted was because there was too much competition, coupled with the political pressure to let in those from very deprived backgrounds - using blanket formula that deliberately discriminate against anyone who went to a highly achieving school - STATE OR PRIVATE.
 
 
 
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