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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    On some levels, yes he has. Universities have been capped this year for the number of students that take into the first year. A policy set up and enforced by the government. So fewer students were going to get in anyway as a.) less places
    The cap was lower than last years intake?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    The cap was lower than last years intake?
    If last year you mean 08 entry? Yes it was. The idea was that universities would be freezed in size for I think it was a good 4 years. Applying for 2009 entry was meant to be one of the hardest years to get in from what I've been told. Had an in-depth discussion with a tutor about the state of Higher Education and we got onto the subject of undergrad admissions
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    40 graduates to every graduate job?

    Oh. Well, I have to feed my fish. Afk.
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    (Original post by Terry Acky)
    they might do a simple calculation to decide, like, 75,000 divided by 6.
    It's not that simple, what about council tax (varies), income tax, child benefits etc etc.
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    meh will all be sorted when i apply for 2010..................!
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    A quote from the article:


    "The last 10 years of education policy have been designed to increase applications to higher education. Now the policy has been successful, we are turning people away. It is a tragedy.''

    I really feel for all applicants this year. Getting your a-levels is horrific. I personally didn't get into my first choice, but got my insurance. And as much as I begged Bristol they just wouldn't take me, and this was three years ago. However, it was the right choice in my life, have enjoyed life at Essex very much and don't regret it at all. Now just have to think about trying to get a graduate job next year...


    For arguments sake, should they be letting so many overseas students come to uk universities, especially since it is now such a struggle to get a place for all students...?
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    (Original post by Apricot_Bea)
    For arguments sake, should they be letting so many overseas students come to uk universities, especially since it is now such a struggle to get a place for all students...?
    -> http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=984481
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    (Original post by livefast)
    coupled with the political pressure to let in those from very deprived backgrounds - using blanket formula that deliberately discriminate against anyone who went to a highly achieving school - STATE OR PRIVATE.
    Where's your evidence for that? Coming personally from a deprived school/background myself I haven't seen evidence of this anywhere - I'm one of the very few who has managed to get onto university out of my group of friends from similar backgrounds, and that's not to do with intellect, it's to do with money.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    It's not that simple, what about council tax (varies), income tax, child benefits etc etc.
    i'll tell you whats not that simple. our love, i used to love you and i'm sure the feelings were mutual, whats gone wrong?
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Where's your evidence for that? Coming personally from a deprived school/background myself I haven't seen evidence of this anywhere - I'm one of the very few who has managed to get onto university out of my group of friends from similar backgrounds, and that's not to do with intellect, it's to do with money.
    You wouldn't have seen it yet. It's being proposed by Peter Mandelson as we speak, it was front page of the Sunday Times yesterday. However, there is definitely and undeniably a feeling of pressure to accept more from poorer backgrounds at university, you can't deny that. That's no bad thing though - as long as the means do not include blanket formulae that positively discriminate. There is no justification for this, it is simply a way to create statistics quickly and conveniently, whilst making the system less meritocratic (which is what Labour have stood for all these years - meritocratic society allows complete social mobility). Mandelson is proposing a two-tier admissions system - one which adds two A-level grades to those students who attend poorer performing state schools. But actually what should be happening, is state schools should be given better careers services and vastly improved facilities.

    Also, money is not an issue, as the grants and loans low-income households receive actually far surpass those from average middle class income families - I know because I receive these low income grants and loans as well. We have far more disposable income at university than the students whose parents that earn a combined salary of say, £50,000 (£25,000 per parent before tax - the average salary). So don't give me that line - it's outdated and completely untrue.
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    (Original post by livefast)
    You wouldn't have seen it yet. It's being proposed by Peter Mandelson as we speak, it was front page of the Sunday Times yesterday. However, there is definitely and undeniably a feeling of pressure to accept more from poorer backgrounds at university, you can't deny that. That's no bad thing though - as long as the means do not include blanket formulae that positively discriminate. There is no justification for this, it is simply a way to create statistics quickly and conveniently, whilst making the system less meritocratic (which is what Labour have stood for all these years - meritocratic society allows complete social mobility). Mandelson is proposing a two-tier admissions system - one which adds two A-level grades to those students who attend poorer performing state schools. But actually what should be happening, is state schools should be given better careers services and vastly improved facilities.
    What do you mean by this?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    That's higher education! Not everyone can get in. And isn't this the actual point of applying to uni? Trying to get a place rather than being guaranteed one?

    Tbh, if you really want to go to uni, or more specifically the uni/course you want to go to, you'd work hard for it. If you miss your grades - tough luck. And don't give me this business about 1 or 2 UMS - there has to be a cut-off point somewhere, and I'm sorry to say, you missed it!

    Seems these days AAA doesn't cut it. And why should it? Apparently loads of people get AAA and AAB. Getting AAA =/= offer. As people said on this forum "grades don't mean everything".

    You have to impress to get the offer. Not just stick through A-level and hope you haven't failed one of them.

    This is reality!
    I agree with most of what you've said apart from the last bit.

    From my experience and from what I saw of my peers, getting offers from universities outside the top 5 or so (but not bad unis though i.e. places like Birmingham) is pretty dam easy. People who got grades like BBCC in their AS levels were getting offers for AAB/ABB courses from Russell Group unis for christ sake.

    This is probably why unis are going to go on a ruthless rejecting spree on results day this year, though.
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    What do you mean by this?
    The reform would mean someone with AAA from a performing school would be given an offer as if he was equal to someone with ABB from an under performing school. It thus positively discriminates; as there is a big difference in effort/intelligence between AAA and ABB.

    The same goes for ABB, to BBC/ACC, etc!
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    I feel more than nervous now...
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    (Original post by livefast)
    The reform would mean someone with AAA from a performing school would be given an offer as if he was equal to someone with ABB from an under performing school. It thus positively discriminates; as there is a big difference in effort/intelligence between AAA and ABB.

    The same goes for ABB, to BBC/ACC, etc!
    Right, I see, thanks for the information.
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    huh... I applied to clearing and got in within 12 hours... so isn't this a bit exaggerated? or then my course (computer science) or my university (heriot watt) aren't very popular?
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    (Original post by LouisianaPuuurchase)
    Right, I see, thanks for the information.
    no problem! and whilst we're on it. manchester all the way! haha. had to put it in at some point! x
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    (Original post by livefast)
    no problem! and whilst we're on it. manchester all the way! haha. had to put it in at some point! x
    Right on! :cool:
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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...niversity.html



    Only 22,000 clearing places will be available, half as many as last year :eek:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...ions-boom.html

    Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, The London School of Economics, Newcastle, Oxford and University College London - have no clearing vacancies at all.

    There's a 36% increase for sixth form leavers for The Open University, has anybody considered applying or actually applied?
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    You're lucky my pimp hand is asleep . My pimp hand does not appreciate duplicate threads.
 
 
 
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