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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    I think empathy would be a better choice here - to my understanding it means you can imagine yourself in their shoes and feel with them, while sympathy is only to feel sorry for them
    Thank you. My teacher checked it over, and was convinced empathy was the wrong word, as she said it meant that you have been in a similar position and therefore could identify with them. :confused: I think I'll just stich with empathy
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    I saw recently here (and NO amount of searching has re-found it) something someone pasted, saying the things admissions tutors look for in a personal statement, as written by an admission tutor or something.

    I remember some points, such as 'a good understanding into the work of a junior doctor' but i cannot remember the full text, yet I copied & pasted it into word, saved it and now it is gone.

    Does anybody have this guidance? I can't find it anywhere!
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    Hey guys. I'm a third year student at Queen Mary, and I'm going to apply for medicine this year. Should I write in my personal statement that I'm currently at uni or it doesn't matter?

    Thanks
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    off topic but i found out that a teacher from my school was an admissions tutor for UCL and he is gnna read every1s PS to see if they are any good. Class or what
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    just having a little stress out!

    how on earth did you (medical students) /do you condense your PS within the word limit? I'm commenting on what i've learnt in my W.E and how that'll contribute to my being a good doctor etc... or should i not do that for every bit? just say i did this this this... and not comment on what i learnt/saw for some things? also, i seem to talk about teamwork in relation to activities i do quite a lot. should i just mention it once (say, in young entreprise)

    any advice gladly welcome by a frazzled/confused 17 year old!
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    It would make sense to write what you've been doing with your life since leaving school, yes - whether you're applying for grad programmes or not. Doesn't have to be loads, but should definitely get a mention, including any particular bits of work/learning that have steered you towards medicine.
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    (Original post by matt^)
    can i just write 'i attended Medisix blah blah' or would i need to explain what Medisix is??
    im really hoping its not the latter as im desperately trying to cut stuff
    Don't include it all. It won't count for anything, so there's better things you can use the space on.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    Don't include it all. It won't count for anything, so there's better things you can use the space on.
    Is there any point including medicine-experience courses?
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    Is there any point including medicine-experience courses?
    Well, it's a polite way of letting admissions tutors know you have cash to burn. :teeth:

    In all seriousness, no, not really. It doesn't show anything - you haven't put yourself out, independently found out about things etc.

    The relevant information learnt at those should be known by a lot of medicine applicants as standard, as a lot of it is readily available online (The TSR Wiki is probably far better as a resource, and free), so it's not as if by saying you've been on a course you have an advantage over those who didn't. Your space would be far better spent discussing and reflecting on things that you are able to give a unique interpretation on, like work experience or private research, as that will impress them far more.

    Of course, this is all totally at odds with what people on the course will have said, I imagine they'll have been quite enthusiastic about putting it on your personal statement. But they're hardly likely to tell you their course is worthless.
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    (Original post by matt^)
    not even to say that i have an insight into life at uni to show that ive thought about my decision?
    There are things that show those concepts far better - work experience for example clearly shows you've experienced medicine first hand and contemplated whether it's right for you.

    In my opinion, paid-for courses don't show any of those skills - you don't really have an insight into uni life any more than if you went to an open day and talked to some students (and I doubt you'd put that on your PS), and you haven't thought about your decision by going on that course directly.

    You should be able to come up with more personalised ways to express those ideas that will impress tutors more.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    Well, it's a polite way of letting admissions tutors know you have cash to burn. :teeth:

    In all seriousness, no, not really. It doesn't show anything - you haven't put yourself out, independently found out about things etc.

    The relevant information learnt at those should be known by a lot of medicine applicants as standard, as a lot of it is readily available online (The TSR Wiki is probably far better as a resource, and free), so it's not as if by saying you've been on a course you have an advantage over those who didn't. Your space would be far better spent discussing and reflecting on things that you are able to give a unique interpretation on, like work experience or private research, as that will impress them far more.

    Of course, this is all totally at odds with what people on the course will have said, I imagine they'll have been quite enthusiastic about putting it on your personal statement. But they're hardly likely to tell you their course is worthless.
    You have an annoying knack of always being right :rolleyes: Anyway, with that stuff gone, I'm almost down to 4000 characters :woo:

    Another quick question: Is it bad that I've got spoken about my WE and voluntary work for most of it and my ECs are just squeezed in near the end? I see people talking about 50/50 or 60/40 splits and it's just not going to happen for me :no:
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    You have an annoying knack of always being right :rolleyes: Anyway, with that stuff gone, I'm almost down to 4000 characters :woo:

    Another quick question: Is it bad that I've got spoken about my WE and voluntary work for most of it and my ECs are just squeezed in near the end? I see people talking about 50/50 or 60/40 splits and it's just not going to happen for me :no:
    My personal statement is the same. I think reflecting on work experience was more important for me as it gave me a lot more to think/talk about. The extra curricular was just my stress busting techniques really. I don't think I needed more than four lines for it. I think I talked about two ECs. I think that should be enough really. Since the whole point of my ECs are primarily for the reson I mentioned earlier.

    Unless your ECs give you loads and loads to talk about, which you haven't covered earlier, I don't think it's worth the worry.
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    You have an annoying knack of always being right :rolleyes: Anyway, with that stuff gone, I'm almost down to 4000 characters :woo:

    Another quick question: Is it bad that I've got spoken about my WE and voluntary work for most of it and my ECs are just squeezed in near the end? I see people talking about 50/50 or 60/40 splits and it's just not going to happen for me :no:
    Sorry.

    I think it's about what's finding the best for you. There's not a specific formula to follow, and trying to stick to any template will just make it lose any personality and uniqueness you might be able to transfer.

    My PS had a quite a lot going on in there, and guesstimating now I'd say about 85% of it was based on my work experiences/volunteering (but this also included research I'd done on stem cells) with the rest being split quite evenly between academia and extra-curriculars. So mine wasn't very even at all - I felt I'd be able to convey more by talking about stuff directly related to medicine than trying to shoehorn in contrived links between skydiving and the subject, and I only included some comments about my extra-curriculars (football playing and film reviews - I'm not sure I'd have been able to stretch that to half of it :p:) to show I was well-rounded.

    But some people will have been radically different to that, so I don't think it's too strict on what kind of content you have to have. It's all about putting across what you want, and the best way you think you can do that.
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    (Original post by munim)
    My personal statement is the same. I think reflecting on work experience was more important for me as it gave me a lot more to think/talk about. The extra curricular was just my stress busting techniques really. I don't think I needed more than four lines for it. I think I talked about two ECs. I think that should be enough really. Since the whole point of my ECs are primarily for the reson I mentioned earlier.

    Unless your ECs give you loads and loads to talk about, which you haven't covered earlier, I don't think it's worth the worry.
    Thanks for calming my nerves!
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    Thanks for calming my nerves!

    No problem! =]

    To be honest, I think med schools just want to see a candidate that knows what they're getting into and is interested in other things too. I think a paragraph on ECs is just fine! It shows you have interests outside of med, but having your PS mainly about W/E shows how dedicated you've been in trying to learn as much about the subject/profession as possible (to me anyways).
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    Sorry.

    I think it's about what's finding the best for you. There's not a specific formula to follow, and trying to stick to any template will just make it lose any personality and uniqueness you might be able to transfer.

    My PS had a quite a lot going on in there, and guesstimating now I'd say about 85% of it was based on my work experiences/volunteering (but this also included research I'd done on stem cells) with the rest being split quite evenly between academia and extra-curriculars. So mine wasn't very even at all - I felt I'd be able to convey more by talking about stuff directly related to medicine than trying to shoehorn in contrived links between skydiving and the subject, and I only included some comments about my extra-curriculars (football playing and film reviews - I'm not sure I'd have been able to stretch that to half of it :p:) to show I was well-rounded.

    But some people will have been radically different to that, so I don't think it's too strict on what kind of content you have to have. It's all about putting across what you want, and the best way you think you can do that.
    Yep, exactly, some people tend to miss out the 'personal' from 'personal statement' :lol:
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    Yep, exactly, some people tend to miss out the 'personal' from 'personal statement' :lol:
    Indeed. I think the personal statement should be a lot more about expressing yourself as an individual than simply trying to fit into a mould of what you expect the admissions tutors to be looking for. After all, if you are just yourself and don't get an interview/offer, then clearly that school is just not the right place for you. That was my view, anyway.

    Congrats on your UKCAT score, by the way. :holmes:
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    (Original post by munim)
    No problem! =]

    To be honest, I think med schools just want to see a candidate that knows what they're getting into and is interested in other things too. I think a paragraph on ECs is just fine! It shows you have interests outside of med, but having your PS mainly about W/E shows how dedicated you've been in trying to learn as much about the subject/profession as possible (to me anyways).
    Amen! :gah:
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    Indeed. I think the personal statement should be a lot more about expressing yourself as an individual than simply trying to fit into a mould of what you expect the admissions tutors to be looking for. After all, if you are just yourself and don't get an interview/offer, then clearly that school is just not the right place for you. That was my view, anyway.

    Congrats on your UKCAT score, by the way. :holmes:
    Exactly, and at this stage, I'm starting to wonder how amazing a PS can really be? I'm going to read the library in the next two days and see if there's any that actually jump out the screen. Two days to go :argh:

    Thankyou :ninja:
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    Just don't put in your entire life story, put in a few important things you did/learnt. There was tons of extra stuff I could have put in but they weren't as important imo as what I did put in.

    Plus you should post this in the ps section for help :p:
 
 
 
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