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    Yup, usually you mention a single quality only once

    Leave out extra details like names and stuff :p:
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    (Original post by applemilk1992)
    I saw recently here (and NO amount of searching has re-found it) something someone pasted, saying the things admissions tutors look for in a personal statement, as written by an admission tutor or something.

    I remember some points, such as 'a good understanding into the work of a junior doctor' but i cannot remember the full text, yet I copied & pasted it into word, saved it and now it is gone.

    Does anybody have this guidance? I can't find it anywhere!
    For which uni most list what they are after on their websites
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    (Original post by just say hello)
    off topic but i found out that a teacher from my school was an admissions tutor for UCL and he is gnna read every1s PS to see if they are any good. Class or what
    some ppl need extra help.
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    I envisage universities doing away with personal statements in years to come :facepalm2: :facepalm2: :facepalm2:


    Go to your PS writing lessons at school, read TSR for tips, then WRITE YOUR OWN!!! :facepalm:
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    (Original post by applemilk1992)
    I saw recently here (and NO amount of searching has re-found it) something someone pasted, saying the things admissions tutors look for in a personal statement, as written by an admission tutor or something.

    I remember some points, such as 'a good understanding into the work of a junior doctor' but i cannot remember the full text, yet I copied & pasted it into word, saved it and now it is gone.

    Does anybody have this guidance? I can't find it anywhere!
    I started trying to get information from all the universities on what they're looking for from the personal statement. Here are a few of them:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Aberdeen
    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/medicine/prosp...lanning/hints/
    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/prospectus/ugr...&prog=medicine
    Prospective medical students must demonstrate a clear commitment to medicine and have an understanding of what a doctor’s job entails. We need to ensure that applicants are entering this profession with their eyes open and understand the implications and commitments of such a career. Candidates should display an understanding of the core qualities required of a doctor and show evidence of teamwork and involvement in other non-academic pursuits. Medicine is a career in which time-management, team working and decision-making are very important. We look for candidates who lead full and busy lives, as well as achieving academic success. This reflects the lives they will lead after qualification.
    Although not essential, medically related work experience is useful as a means of researching a career in medicine, but unfortunately, not always available. However, it is essential that every candidate explores the realities of a career in medicine by as many means as possible. It is important for students to inform us of what they have learned from this research, rather than just list their experiences.

    Barts
    http://www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/faqs/#8a
    There are no set expectations as to the content of your personal statement. We want to know why you wish to study your subject and to find out about you as a person and what you could contribute to our University. This includes any interests and hobbies, voluntary work, travel etc. If you consider yourself to have extenuating circumstances, please also mention these here.

    Birmingham
    http://www.medicine.bham.ac.uk/ug/mbchb/guidance.shtml
    It is important to be able to demonstrate that you are well-motivated towards a career in medicine, and are considered to possess the other qualities required of a potential doctor.

    Brighton and Sussex
    http://www.bsms.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ying/index.php
    In assessing your application BSMS admissions tutors will be seeking evidence of:
    ·a realistic attitude to medical training and clinical practice
    ·a commitment to caring for others
    ·the ability to communicate and work effectively within a team
    ·the ability to appreciate other people's point of view
    ·a willingness to accept responsibility.

    Bristol
    http://www.medici.bris.ac.uk/general...sionsstatement
    http://www.medici.bris.ac.uk/general...te/faqs#motive
    Bristol%27s"]http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun/search/search/StateId/D8iZ1G_tN6uIIh0mbG1m2BImV5Gs1-3RNa/HAHTpage/search.HsProfileDetails.run?n=95 6612#3-3]Bristol's entry profile on UCAS[/url]
    The candidate needs to demonstrate:
    1)a realistic interest in Medicine?
    2)informed him/herself about a career in Medicine?
    3)demonstrated a commitment to helping others?
    4)demonstrated a wide range of interests?
    5)contributed to school/college/community activities?
    6)a range of personal achievements (excluding exams)?
    ·Your personal statement should explain your reasons for wanting to study the course and why you think that you would make a good doctor. You'll need to be able to demonstrate that you fully grasp what a medical career involves, and are aware of current developments.

    ·It is important that you enjoy, as well as understand, the basic sciences. You will be expected to have read outside of your A Level subjects and be aware of current scientific issues.

    ·You are expected to show in your personal statement that you have made some effort to find out what it would be like to work as a doctor. We are not necessarily looking for medically-related work experience, such as shadowing a GP or consultant, as such experience can be difficult to obtain if you are under the age of 18. However, we are interested in caring experience that may or may not be medically related (for example, a hospital, an old people's home, hospice, work with people who are disabled or have special needs, homeless shelters, youth groups etc), which should ideally be gained over the year before you expect to arrive. Tell us in your personal statement how you got involved in such work, how long you have been doing it, how much time you spend on it each week and, most importantly, what you have gained from it. We will expect you to have an insight into medicine and healthcare gained from general reading. It might also be useful to attend medical careers conferences, or to talk to doctors or current medical students.

    ·Good communication skills are essential. Can you explain complex information simply and coherently? Some knowledge of a European language would be useful for those who wish to participate in European exchanges.

    ·You will need to have a logical mind, so that you will be able to formulate questions and solve problems.

    ·You will need to be self-motivated. Can you set your own goals and show independence of thought? However, you will also need to be able to work well in a team. Are you prepared to work long hours?

    ·You'll need to have a strong interest in human affairs, and a concern for the welfare of others. Can you reassure people, in order to put them at their ease?

    ·We are also interested to hear about your wide-ranging extra-curricular activities, and general interests, especially where this provides evidence of collaborative engagement with the wider community. How do you contribute to your school or community? Do you have any positions of responsibility? Have you done any voluntary or paid work? What do you do to relax? Why do you enjoy your interests and hobbies, and how long have you pursued them? Have you achieved any outside recognition (e.g., awards, certificates, etc.)? You should explain what skills you have gained, rather than simply enumerating your activities. It is essential that you are able to communicate, empathise, and work well with others. We are not concerned with exactly what you do in your spare time, but want to know that you use your spare time to your best advantage.

    ·Doctors must develop a high standard of professional responsibility. You should show that you are a reliable and conscientious person. This is a professional qualification with close interaction with the NHS, and you'll be expected to follow a professional code of practice from your first day of study. In addition, you'll be placed in a position of considerable trust and responsibility when you finish training.


    (Original post by stardustfairy)
    just having a little stress out!

    how on earth did you (medical students) /do you condense your PS within the word limit? I'm commenting on what i've learnt in my W.E and how that'll contribute to my being a good doctor etc... or should i not do that for every bit? just say i did this this this... and not comment on what i learnt/saw for some things? also, i seem to talk about teamwork in relation to activities i do quite a lot. should i just mention it once (say, in young entreprise)

    any advice gladly welcome by a frazzled/confused 17 year old!
    Remember, you only need to demonstrate each skill once, so having 3 different activities in there, each showing the same skills is pointless.

    Reflecting on what you learnt/saw is more important than just describing what you did.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    some ppl need extra help.
    Ye thats why i said it, why would you not use the help if its there
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    I started trying to get information from all the universities on what they're looking for from the personal statement. Here are a few of them:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Aberdeen
    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/medicine/prosp...lanning/hints/
    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/prospectus/ugr...&prog=medicine
    Prospective medical students must demonstrate a clear commitment to medicine and have an understanding of what a doctor’s job entails. We need to ensure that applicants are entering this profession with their eyes open and understand the implications and commitments of such a career. Candidates should display an understanding of the core qualities required of a doctor and show evidence of teamwork and involvement in other non-academic pursuits. Medicine is a career in which time-management, team working and decision-making are very important. We look for candidates who lead full and busy lives, as well as achieving academic success. This reflects the lives they will lead after qualification.
    Although not essential, medically related work experience is useful as a means of researching a career in medicine, but unfortunately, not always available. However, it is essential that every candidate explores the realities of a career in medicine by as many means as possible. It is important for students to inform us of what they have learned from this research, rather than just list their experiences.

    Barts
    http://www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/faqs/#8a
    There are no set expectations as to the content of your personal statement. We want to know why you wish to study your subject and to find out about you as a person and what you could contribute to our University. This includes any interests and hobbies, voluntary work, travel etc. If you consider yourself to have extenuating circumstances, please also mention these here.

    Birmingham
    http://www.medicine.bham.ac.uk/ug/mbchb/guidance.shtml
    It is important to be able to demonstrate that you are well-motivated towards a career in medicine, and are considered to possess the other qualities required of a potential doctor.

    Brighton and Sussex
    http://www.bsms.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ying/index.php
    In assessing your application BSMS admissions tutors will be seeking evidence of:
    ·a realistic attitude to medical training and clinical practice
    ·a commitment to caring for others
    ·the ability to communicate and work effectively within a team
    ·the ability to appreciate other people's point of view
    ·a willingness to accept responsibility.

    Bristol
    http://www.medici.bris.ac.uk/general...sionsstatement
    http://www.medici.bris.ac.uk/general...te/faqs#motive
    Bristol%27s"]http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun/search/search/StateId/D8iZ1G_tN6uIIh0mbG1m2BImV5Gs1-3RNa/HAHTpage/search.HsProfileDetails.run?n=95 6612#3-3]Bristol's entry profile on UCAS[/url]
    The candidate needs to demonstrate:
    1)a realistic interest in Medicine?
    2)informed him/herself about a career in Medicine?
    3)demonstrated a commitment to helping others?
    4)demonstrated a wide range of interests?
    5)contributed to school/college/community activities?
    6)a range of personal achievements (excluding exams)?
    ·Your personal statement should explain your reasons for wanting to study the course and why you think that you would make a good doctor. You'll need to be able to demonstrate that you fully grasp what a medical career involves, and are aware of current developments.

    ·It is important that you enjoy, as well as understand, the basic sciences. You will be expected to have read outside of your A Level subjects and be aware of current scientific issues.

    ·You are expected to show in your personal statement that you have made some effort to find out what it would be like to work as a doctor. We are not necessarily looking for medically-related work experience, such as shadowing a GP or consultant, as such experience can be difficult to obtain if you are under the age of 18. However, we are interested in caring experience that may or may not be medically related (for example, a hospital, an old people's home, hospice, work with people who are disabled or have special needs, homeless shelters, youth groups etc), which should ideally be gained over the year before you expect to arrive. Tell us in your personal statement how you got involved in such work, how long you have been doing it, how much time you spend on it each week and, most importantly, what you have gained from it. We will expect you to have an insight into medicine and healthcare gained from general reading. It might also be useful to attend medical careers conferences, or to talk to doctors or current medical students.

    ·Good communication skills are essential. Can you explain complex information simply and coherently? Some knowledge of a European language would be useful for those who wish to participate in European exchanges.

    ·You will need to have a logical mind, so that you will be able to formulate questions and solve problems.

    ·You will need to be self-motivated. Can you set your own goals and show independence of thought? However, you will also need to be able to work well in a team. Are you prepared to work long hours?

    ·You'll need to have a strong interest in human affairs, and a concern for the welfare of others. Can you reassure people, in order to put them at their ease?

    ·We are also interested to hear about your wide-ranging extra-curricular activities, and general interests, especially where this provides evidence of collaborative engagement with the wider community. How do you contribute to your school or community? Do you have any positions of responsibility? Have you done any voluntary or paid work? What do you do to relax? Why do you enjoy your interests and hobbies, and how long have you pursued them? Have you achieved any outside recognition (e.g., awards, certificates, etc.)? You should explain what skills you have gained, rather than simply enumerating your activities. It is essential that you are able to communicate, empathise, and work well with others. We are not concerned with exactly what you do in your spare time, but want to know that you use your spare time to your best advantage.

    ·Doctors must develop a high standard of professional responsibility. You should show that you are a reliable and conscientious person. This is a professional qualification with close interaction with the NHS, and you'll be expected to follow a professional code of practice from your first day of study. In addition, you'll be placed in a position of considerable trust and responsibility when you finish training.




    Remember, you only need to demonstrate each skill once, so having 3 different activities in there, each showing the same skills is pointless.

    Reflecting on what you learnt/saw is more important than just describing what you did.
    I found what they look for at the unis below except Keele, any ideas?
    I'm applying for:
    Soton, Keele, BSMS, Glasgow

    I was just wondering where charity work in school would go? Will it be in volunteering or EC?
    The same question for Youth Mentoring? Should paid work experience (childrens nursery & administration) go before volunteering?
    One more question :P When relating skills like communication or teamwork to medicine, how much detail should I go into e.g. is it "I learnt ___ from ____, which is important for a career in medicine." or should I mention why it's important?
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    Do you guys think it's okay for me to mention an interest in the role (or absence) of circumcision today?

    I realise it's abit of a weird subject to discuss about , but I've read quite alot about it and feel that I can objectively talk about both sides of the argument .. :o:
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    (Original post by aimz08)
    I found what they look for at the unis below except Keele, any ideas?
    I'm applying for:
    Soton, Keele, BSMS, Glasgow

    I was just wondering where charity work in school would go? Will it be in volunteering or EC?
    The same question for Youth Mentoring? Should paid work experience (childrens nursery & administration) go before volunteering?
    One more question :P When relating skills like communication or teamwork to medicine, how much detail should I go into e.g. is it "I learnt ___ from ____, which is important for a career in medicine." or should I mention why it's important?
    Why it's important is a good thing to include. Charity work could be in either, youth mentoring would probably be better in volunteering. Usually I'd say that if it's a hobby, it belongs in EC.

    Keele
    PERSONAL STATEMENT

    Reasons for choosing medicine. This may appear obvious to you. It is not obvious to us. The Director of Admissions and Admissions Tutors have not met you and know nothing about you. It is vital that you tell us why you wish to be a doctor. Do not be afraid of apparently "trite" comments such as a desire to help people or a desire to care. There is no "correct" answer to this question but not to address it at all would seriously weaken any application.

    Work experience in a caring role. We believe that it is helpful to undertake long-term, hands-on work experience in a caring role, so that you are aware of what a career in caring for people may involve. Work experience can take many forms, from helping elderly members of the community with shopping, through to volunteering in a hospice, or working with disadvantaged children. You'll need to tell us how long and how regularly you have been involved in the activity and, most importantly, what you have gained from it. We are not necessarily looking for medically-related work experience, such as shadowing a GP or consultant, although this type of experience is useful in addition to your hands-on involvement in a caring role.

    Interests/hobbies. Medicine is about being able to communicate. Good communication calls for you to have some shared life experiences and empathy with others. Hence if you are totally absorbed in your studies to the exclusion of almost all else, you are less likely to make a good doctor. Tell us about your interests and hobbies. Tell us why you pursue them. How long have you been involved? Have you achieved any outside recognition (e.g awards, certificates, etc). Do you coach or lead people in your hobby? In any medical career it is vital that you retain a work-life balance, and so it is important that in your Personal Statement you reflect on your outside interests that help you relax from the stresses of work. We are aware that some students may have more opportunities than others to pursue a wide range of interests. We are not so much concerned with exactly what you do in your spare time, but that you have some spare time and that you do something with it that you are enthusiastic about.
    Communication and teamworking. Doctors must be able to communicate effectively on a variety of levels. Experience in communicating with different groups, including those with significant communication barriers, is highly valuable. Medicine involves working within teams and it is vital that potential doctors understand how teams work, and how their own role would contribute to the overall effectiveness of the team. Examples of teamworking may be taken from a wide variety of experiences both in and out of school/college/university.

    Presentation and style. Applications will be marked down for careless errors of grammar and spelling, so please consider carefully how you have presented your Personal Statement.
    http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ms/unde...tudentinfo.htm

    Work Experience
    We strongly recommend that applicants undertake work experience in a caring-type role; this need not be hospital or general practice based. We encourage applicants to tell us how they became involved in such work, for how long, how much time they spend each week, and most importantly what they gained from it.
    http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ms/unde...quirements.htm

    The Admissions Tutors assess the personal statement and reference for:
    • Reasons for choosing medicine/changing to medicine.
    • Work experience in a caring role.
    • Interests/hobbies/sports.
    • Knowledge/experience of health care system in UK.
    • Evidence of teamwork.
    • Communication skills.
    • Determination/conscientiousness.
    • Intellectual achievements and potential.
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    Do you guys think it's okay for me to mention an interest in the role (or absence) of circumcision today?

    I realise it's abit of a weird subject to discuss about , but I've read quite alot about it and feel that I can objectively talk about both sides of the argument ..
    If it's something that interests you and you've read about then go ahead
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    Do you guys think it's okay for me to mention an interest in the role (or absence) of circumcision today?

    I realise it's abit of a weird subject to discuss about , but I've read quite alot about it and feel that I can objectively talk about both sides of the argument .. :o:
    If it's an issue you know a lot about, then it would make sense to include it. However, if you don't think you'd feel comfortable discussing the topic with several strangers in an interview (because it would come up), then it might be better to leave it out.
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    If it's something that interests you and you've read about then go ahead
    (Original post by Phalanges)
    If it's an issue you know a lot about, then it would make sense to include it. However, if you don't think you'd feel comfortable discussing the topic with several strangers in an interview (because it would come up), then it might be better to leave it out.
    Makes sense !

    Thanks both of you
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    Makes sense !

    Thanks both of you
    No worries. :top2: Glad I could help.
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    Another thing...my head of sixth form suggested that i shouldnt include the fact that I mentioned that hosp drs were frustrated when patients had delays in leaving the hosp and develped infections.

    I thought it would be important to include some of the bad things about being a doctor...not sure now?
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    (Original post by aimz08)
    Another thing...my head of sixth form suggested that i shouldnt include the fact that I mentioned that hosp drs were frustrated when patients had delays in leaving the hosp and develped infections.

    I thought it would be important to include some of the bad things about being a doctor...not sure now?
    I would be careful in wording it correctly. If you've finished your PS, post it in the PS Help section. The helpers will tell you too cut it out if needs be (or they might tell you to rewrite a part.)
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    (Original post by munim)
    I would be careful in wording it correctly. If you've finished your PS, post it in the PS Help section. The helpers will tell you too cut it out if needs be (or they might tell you to rewrite a part.)
    Okay thanks, Mine's 6000 characters atm so I think I'll cut it down a bit more then post it...
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    I really hate writting personal statments-they are a real personal pain!!
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    another question...

    I spent a week at a local veterinary clinic to help ensure that I am making a fully informed decission in studying medicine by exploring different medically related careers. should I mention this in the hope that it shows I have considered other careers so i'm making a clear, consious fully informed decission or should I leave it out because it'll look like I wasn't 100% dedicated to medicine as a career? thanks
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    (Original post by aimz08)
    Another thing...my head of sixth form suggested that i shouldnt include the fact that I mentioned that hosp drs were frustrated when patients had delays in leaving the hosp and develped infections.

    I thought it would be important to include some of the bad things about being a doctor...not sure now?
    I talked about negatives to the career. It shows that you have seriously thought and considered your decision rather than just blindly going into it, and understand what you're letting yourself in for.

    There's no harm in being a realist.

    (Original post by stardustfairy)
    another question...

    I spent a week at a local veterinary clinic to help ensure that I am making a fully informed decission in studying medicine by exploring different medically related careers. should I mention this in the hope that it shows I have considered other careers so i'm making a clear, consious fully informed decission or should I leave it out because it'll look like I wasn't 100% dedicated to medicine as a career? thanks
    You can mention it, but I wouldn't dwell on it too much as it's not that relevant. Medical schools aren't necessary looking for someone 100% dedicated since they were 9, if anything they'll be pleased to see that you've explored other options.
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    Do you guys think it's okay for me to mention an interest in the role (or absence) of circumcision today?

    I realise it's abit of a weird subject to discuss about , but I've read quite alot about it and feel that I can objectively talk about both sides of the argument .. :o:
    :rofl:

    i cant tell if your seroioous or not? lol
 
 
 
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