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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    Last question hopefully. How do you use semi-colons accurately? I've used them to seperate a sentence from a phrase which further expands on the sentece e.g. I learnt to meet deadlines; useful for studying medicine. I've also used them in the following way e.g. Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities; care of patients, paperwork etc. They're not actual sentences from my PS but is the punctuation correct?
    Well from my knowledge of GCSE english, I'm pretty sure that you're using it incorrectly. I think you use it when you want to string together two sentences which are related to each other. Basically, you have to make sure that the two parts would make sense if they were two sentences.

    e.g. I learnt to meet deadlines by being more organised, which is vital for studying medicine; dedication is also essential in order to be successful.
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    Well from my knowledge of GCSE english, I'm pretty sure that you're using it incorrectly. I think you use it when you want to string together two sentences which are related to each other. Basically, you have to make sure that the two parts would make sense if they were two sentences.

    e.g. I learnt to meet deadlines by being more organised, which is vital for studying medicine; dedication is also essential in order to be successful.
    What would you use to separate a sentence from a phrase? A colon?
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    I'm really interested in the nervous system, I just don't know how to word it and what part should I tlk about in my PS? Some help would be pleasant.
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    What would you use to separate a sentence from a phrase? A colon?
    Using your example:
    "Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities; care of patients, paperwork etc,"

    You wouldn't use a semicolon. Instead, you would write:
    "Docors have to balance a lot of responsibilities, such as caring for patients, paperwork..."
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    (Original post by alexis 123)
    I'm really interested in the nervous system, I just don't know how to word it and what part should I tlk about in my PS? Some help would be pleasant.
    Hmm, do you feel that we have to elaborate on why we are interested about something?
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    Using your example:
    "Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities; care of patients, paperwork etc,"

    You wouldn't use a semicolon. Instead, you would write:
    "Docors have to balance a lot of responsibilities, such as caring for patients, paperwork..."
    I'm just trying to cut down on my word limit. I'm not sure but couldn't I use a colon in that sentence? Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities: care of patients, paperwork
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    Hmm, do you feel that we have to elaborate on why we are interested about something?
    :p: I have that reason and it's very personal, but I don't know what part to mention there is just so much.
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    I'm just trying to cut down on my word limit. I'm not sure but couldn't I use a colon in that sentence? Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities: care of patients, paperwork
    'a colon informs the reader that what follows proves and explains, or simply enumerates elements of what is referred to before.'
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    (Original post by alexis 123)
    :p: I have that reason and it's very personal, but I don't know what part to mention there is just so much.
    Fair enough. After all, it is a personal statement
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    (Original post by alexis 123)
    'a colon informs the reader that what follows proves and explains, or simply enumerates elements of what is referred to before.'
    So it would be acceptable to use the colon in that context? I've just never used it like that. I always tend to write, "such as" or something similar preceding the colon, but hey, you can find people who are much more qualified to answer such a question on here.
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    Could anyone confirm whether it would be fine to use colons like this. Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities: care of patients, paperwork etc or that incorrect?
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    Could anyone confirm whether it would be fine to use colons like this. Doctors have to balance a lot of responsibilities: care of patients, paperwork etc or that incorrect?
    Yes you can. It's rather list-like, but it is done. =]
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    Would it be appropriate to say that I take part in "my" school badminton league, or "the" school badminton league?
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    Would it be appropriate to say that I take part in "my" school badminton league, or "the" school badminton league?
    I prefer "my" as it sounds more personal, but "the" sounds more official. Lol! Are you over the word limit? If so, "my" would be the way to go! ;D
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    (Original post by munim)
    I prefer "my" as it sounds more personal, but "the" sounds more official. Lol! Are you over the word limit? If so, "my" would be the way to go! ;D
    Hahaha the rest of my personal statement would have to be perfect and I mean perfect to be squabbling over a single character.

    "My" sounds a bit too authoritative, no?
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    "Take part" or "partake"? :p:
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    "Take part" or "partake"? :p:
    The latter. Fewer characters and sounds better to me.. :P
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    "Take part" or "partake"? :p:
    You would never say "partake" in real life, so my teacher said you shouldn't write it in your PS :dontknow:

    Anyway, my question is pretty simple: Should "medicine" have a capital letter each time you write it? Sounds weird to me
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    You would never say "partake" in real life, so my teacher said you shouldn't write it in your PS :dontknow:

    Anyway, my question is pretty simple: Should "medicine" have a capital letter each time you write it? Sounds weird to me
    no, i don't think it should. Well, I'm not writing it with a capital each time. Doesn't seem right.

    Roughly how much of the PS should be w/e, extracurricular and how much should be more general hobbies and so on?
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    (Original post by RoadWarrior)
    You would never say "partake" in real life, so my teacher said you shouldn't write it in your PS :dontknow:

    Anyway, my question is pretty simple: Should "medicine" have a capital letter each time you write it? Sounds weird to me
    Yes it is always Medicine
 
 
 
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