Differentiating an exponential with an indice Watch

someonesbaby
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
How do I prove the sum of two vectors?
0
quote
reply
Unbounded
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
I'm guessing this is:  e^{-x^p} ?

Just remember that  \dfrac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}x} \left(e^{f(x)}\right) = f'(x) e^{f(x)} where  f(x) is a function of x and f'(x) is the first derivative of f(x) (this follows very easily from chain rule).
0
quote
reply
someonesbaby
Badges: 0
#3
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#3
So

-p.x^(p-1).exp(-x^p)?
0
quote
reply
Unbounded
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by someonesbaby)
So

-p.x^(p-1).exp(-x^p)?
Looks right. :yy:
0
quote
reply
someonesbaby
Badges: 0
#5
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#5
Kool, cheers.
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Mini Open Day at the Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Dec '18
  • University of East Anglia
    UEA Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 4 Jan '19
  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 9 Jan '19

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (281)
27.5%
No (741)
72.5%

Watched Threads

View All