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    So a C grade for a poor student would be equivalent to an A grade for a slightly richer student? Erm...I think this has got to be the worst idea I have ever heard.

    'Dad, Mum, can you both quit your jobs for a year so the government can bump up my grades for me? Thanks'
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    Alot of richer people are spoon fed and so do achieve higher results because of this. I went to a grammar school for gcses and decided to go to college for Alevels for a change, i can honestly say that the level of teaching at the grammar school was much better. At grammar school we were forced to do lots of homework, the teachers went over everything blah blah blah. I could imagine that someone who failed in the local comp, would have got atleast c's in the grammar school.

    You can even notice this at university, where some people have obviously never really had to think before, they have just had to digest what they've been shovelled. For example, "write this when you get this question". Often they don't know why they are writing this. When they actually have to think for themselves, research to find their own information and actually read a book rather than have the relevant parts pointed out to them, they begin to struggle. Many adjust, but some find it hard. I'm not saying all are like that, some that go to good schools are very clever. My point is that average people can often get top grades with good teaching, but would have done quite badly without.

    All of that said, i disagree with gifting poorer kids with higher grades. I think grammar schools should be increased or atleast the existing schools should be improved to give everyone this chance. I also think though that we shouldn't be teaching to pass tests and kids should be told why alot more.
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    Pffft, pull the other one.
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    If someone really wants to do well then they can do, and they are a harder-working person for doing it in the first place.
    I go to a uni where a large majority of people are privately educated but I am still there, having paid nothing for my education and doing better than some people who have.

    People from whatever background can get themselves to where they want to be. It's the people with more money than sense who need to be wheedled out of uni, who wouldn't have got there had they not had lots of private tuition to get 15 A*s and then end up with a 2.2.
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    If its so stupid why is it that in private schools/ schools in middle class areas generally get better grades overall? Is this because they work harder? Because it seems clear they are offered a better education...
    And why do most top universitys have more private school student? (or at least a higher percentage of private school student compared with the percentage of private school students applying/ in the country)

    I agree that its unfair on some but better overal, as its harder to get a good grade with poor education. They should make state school better, but if they dont have the money...
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    This is meant to help mix classes together? Won't all the rich kids hate the poor ones for getting their place by virtue of being poor rather than hard work? Way to go Labour!
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    What about students like me who went to a school in a poor area but their parents worked and got screwed out of any helping hand the government might offer?
    The gap in attainment between the middle-classes and working-classes in education is as much to do with home influences as is it to do with the school itself. As well as material factors (which are important, but obvious so I won't bother going into them), cultural capital plays a big part in the bias towards middle-class students. Middle-class culture is dominant in our society, and is therefore closer to the school's values. Therefore, these students are rewarded for what they say and write, and this is converted into higher attainment in the education system. Parents of all classes generally help their children with schoolwork, but as middle-class people have more qualifications and understand the education system better, they're in a more privileged position to help their children.
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    As a 'working class' (or even less) student myself, (both parent's are heavily disabled and therefore cannot work - Yes, I’ve been classed as the 'under-belly' of Society, how nice ¬,¬) I believe this is another vote-maker for the Government, especially from poorer families who may not have voted in the past.

    I'm furious at the fact that only a small minority of people get 'EMA', just because I’m from a low income family and a friend is from (what’s classed as a) 'Middle Class Family', doesn't mean that my friend get's any more money from his parents than I could. To be honest; £30 a week isn't going to get me the Top-range equipment that he has (new Apple Mac **drools**) .. So why is the Government trying?

    (Just realised I was slightly off topic there .. sorry).

    Anywhoo, back on topic ... It's not right that ANYONE is given a "head start" over anyone else. Exams are meant to be the most impartial way of examining students on their individual merit. "Dear Government, Please don't (for a better word) "mess" this up!"
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    I live in a two-up-two-down in a crappy bit of a deprived area, my mum is a cleaner and arranges jewellery at Asda and I am so against this plan.

    It's just so incredibly patronising to think that because Im from a poor background I wouldn't be able to get into a decent university or work hard at college, money is helpful I'll grant you but intelligence doesn't really have anything to do with background.
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    (Original post by ArtGoblin)
    I'm not denying that people from working-class people can achieve three As - of course this happens. But it is a lot easier for middle-class people to do this than it is for people from more disadvantaged backgrounds. Therefore, it's not giving them a 'head-start'; it's putting them at a position that's equal to their middle-class counterparts.
    No. Wrong. It is exactly as hard for a middle-class student to get an A than a working-class student. There's nowhere on any A-Level exam script that says "Tick this box if your Daddy pays higher-rate income tax". Everyone goes into the exam room and sits the same paper, and the grades are awarded based on what you write, not how rich your parents are.

    This proposal isn't making things fairer; it's just a flat-out lie about how well people have done to disguise the fact that after 12 years of Labour poorer students are worse off than they were under Thatcher in terms of educational attainment; both relative to the middle-class and absolutely in terms of average exam results.
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    (Original post by JW92)
    The mentality of libertarianism is greedy and selfish. Look, I can make silly generalisations too.
    Except that this proposed system really is an emblematic Socialist idea, whereas Libertarians have never avowed to support either greed or selfishness, which is purely a myth created by Socialists to undermine support for Libertarianism.
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    They'll get to uni and fail and then be in loads of debt. Government = Fail.
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    (Original post by philjw)
    No. Wrong. It is exactly as hard for a middle-class student to get an A than a working-class student. There's nowhere on any A-Level exam script that says "Tick this box if your Daddy pays higher-rate income tax". Everyone goes into the exam room and sits the same paper, and the grades are awarded based on what you write, not how rich your parents are.

    This proposal isn't making things fairer; it's just a flat-out lie about how well people have done to disguise the fact that after 12 years of Labour poorer students are worse off than they were under Thatcher in terms of educational attainment; both relative to the middle-class and absolutely in terms of average exam results.
    Do you really think society is that simple? How do you explain why the higher someone's parent's income, the higher grades they tend to achieve?
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    (Original post by philjw)
    No. Wrong. It is exactly as hard for a middle-class student to get an A than a working-class student. There's nowhere on any A-Level exam script that says "Tick this box if your Daddy pays higher-rate income tax". Everyone goes into the exam room and sits the same paper, and the grades are awarded based on what you write, not how rich your parents are.

    This proposal isn't making things fairer; it's just a flat-out lie about how well people have done to disguise the fact that after 12 years of Labour poorer students are worse off than they were under Thatcher in terms of educational attainment; both relative to the middle-class and absolutely in terms of average exam results.
    Do you not think your teachers did anything then? Do you really think it would have been just as easy if you had to teach yourself?
    in my experience good teaching makes a massive difference, and if your from a poorer background you much less likely to recieve that.
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    Stupid.

    I'm not exactly sure what the two grade "head start" actually entails - like has been said CCC turns into AAA? I mean there's a reason Oxbridge, say, have high entry requirements - would someone who is on CCC realisticly be able to keep up and do well?
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    (Original post by ArtGoblin)
    The gap in attainment between the middle-classes and working-classes in education is as much to do with home influences as is it to do with the school itself. As well as material factors (which are important, but obvious so I won't bother going into them), cultural capital plays a big part in the bias towards middle-class students. Middle-class culture is dominant in our society, and is therefore closer to the school's values. Therefore, these students are rewarded for what they say and write, and this is converted into higher attainment in the education system. Parents of all classes generally help their children with schoolwork, but as middle-class people have more qualifications and understand the education system better, they're in a more privileged position to help their children.
    You think lower class students do worse because exams cater for middle class students? I've heard it all now. At my school there was 1 A* in the entire year in maths, at the near by private school they got 96% A/A*. Maths couldn't be a reflection of a middle class society.

    I also don't think many people get the priviledge of being helped at home during their a-levels, let alone their GCSEs. The fact of the matter is that schools reflect their intake. My school that only got 1 A* was mostly made up of children from single parent families who wouldn't notice they hadn't come home for a month, let alone care if they'd thrown a chair at a teacher. On the other hand the near by private school was full of children whos parents cared enough about them to send them to private school and would have dealt with the issue of their childs misbehavior accordingly. If you switched the 2 schools pupils like for like i'm pretty sure the grades wouldn't fluctuate very much at all.

    At the end of the day this is a meritocracy, why would we drag down people who have good genes or whose parents give a damn about them by writing on a piece of paper that people who aren't as good as them are instantly put on an equal footing.

    And this plan is mostly to try and level out the crapness of the school the children attend, and these schools aren't just attended by people who are on 15k or less. Either the whole school should get a bump or none at all, especially given the fact it is generally the children who come from low income families who are dragging down the higher income families in the first place.
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    (Original post by philjw)
    No. Wrong. It is exactly as hard for a middle-class student to get an A than a working-class student. There's nowhere on any A-Level exam script that says "Tick this box if your Daddy pays higher-rate income tax". Everyone goes into the exam room and sits the same paper, and the grades are awarded based on what you write, not how rich your parents are.
    You've missed the point. If your teachers tell you what to write to achieve top grades, force you to do lots of homeworks, realise that you're going to get a C and so focus time on you afterschool to an A etc etc, you are likely to do well. If on the other hand your teachers only go over the basic work, rarely set homework and are satisfied if you are going to achieve a C, then you may not do so well.

    Of course you can still do well if you do it yourself, but going to a grammar or private school is a huge advantage. I've witnessed grammar school teaching and college teaching, the people that get high grades at college put in more work in my oppinion. They have to.
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    (Original post by Natasha_c)
    Do you not think your teachers did anything then? Do you really think it would have been just as easy if you had to teach yourself?
    in my experience good teaching makes a massive difference, and if your from a poorer background you much less likely to recieve that.
    A lot of my teachers had been in private/grammar education before coming to my school. It is nothing to do with teachers. It is to do with behavior standards. Every child has a right to education so it is near impossible to kick out really bad children, so every school has a few, when they are expelled 3 times they can be moved school, so really bad students are just juggled. In private schools any misbehaviour and you're out.
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    Proper patronising this.

    I come from a so called 'poor background' yet I got an A in English GCSE when I was 14.
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    (Original post by ArtGoblin)
    Do you really think society is that simple? How do you explain why the higher someone's parent's income, the higher grades they tend to achieve?
    *** hoc ergo propter hoc? Is that what you're suggesting - that people get higher grades because they have rich parents?
 
 
 
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