Grammar schools beat the private sector. Watch

Worried Pasta
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A very interesting article here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...l-ranking.html

Highlights are:

(Original post by Telegraph)
Each pupil gained 73 points more than their privately-educated peers - equivalent to a third of an A grade.
(Original post by Telegraph)
In all, the average grammar school student achieved 966 points - equivalent to three-and-a-half A grades.
(Original post by Telegraph)
Only 164 grammar schools in England remain after widespread closures of selective state schools in the 60s and 70s.

Labour has pledged to stop any more opening, insisting they brand pupils as educational "failures" at 11 if they do not get a place.

But they remain hugely popular with parents.
I'm from a poor background, moved from a comprehensive to a grammar and boy am I glad I did. It's so much easier to learn, the atmosphere is so much calmer and more academic - hardly any violence, disturbances in class, excellent support from teachers who don't have to constantly attend to bullies, etc

I wholly support grammar schools - I think they enable so much social mobility and are a credit to Britain. Without them, I wouldn't be off to Oxford next year (pleeeeease God give me AAA!! :o: ); I wouldn't be the person I am now.

Labours argument is that they brand kids as failures? :confused: But what about the private schools, branding us all as failures in terms of parent income?

Discuss.
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Nutta!
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[QUOTE=Worried Pasta]A very interesting article here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...l-ranking.html

Highlights are:





[quote=Telegraph]Only 164 grammar schools in England remain after widespread closures of selective state schools in the 60s and 70s.

Labour has pledged to stop any more opening, insisting they brand pupils as educational "failures" at 11 if they do not get a place.

But they remain hugely popular with parents.

I'm from a poor background, moved from a comprehensive to a grammar and boy am I glad I did. It's so much easier to learn, the atmosphere is so much calmer and more academic - hardly any violence, disturbances in class, excellent support from teachers who don't have to constantly attend to bullies, etc

I wholly support grammar schools - I think they enable so much social mobility and are a credit to Britain. Without them, I wouldn't be off to Oxford next year (pleeeeease God give me AAA!! :o: ); I wouldn't be the person I am now.

Labours argument is that they brand kids as failures? :confused: But what about the private schools, branding us all as failures in terms of parent income?

Discuss.
Or maybe you are the person who made the grades, made the effort, had the motivation.

Its more about you really not the school you went to
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Worried Pasta
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[QUOTE=Nutta!][QUOTE=Worried Pasta]A very interesting article here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...l-ranking.html

Highlights are:





(Original post by Telegraph)
Only 164 grammar schools in England remain after widespread closures of selective state schools in the 60s and 70s.

Labour has pledged to stop any more opening, insisting they brand pupils as educational "failures" at 11 if they do not get a place.

But they remain hugely popular with parents.

Or maybe you are the person who made the grades, made the effort, had the motivation.

Its more about you really not the school you went to
Nope - honestly, maybe that came from ~40% of me. The other 60% really is down to the school you go to. I was trained for my interviews, given so much unbelievable practice and resources for the exams, had so much support behind me FROM THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. It's totally different at a comprehensive.

The perspective you have is only fair when you actually experience it yourself. :yes:
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Olivia_Lightbulb
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This is a good story but thoroughly unsurprising.
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necessarily benevolent
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I don't even know what type of school I went to. It was state, but not quite grammar or comp.
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lucho22
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Many private schools limit the number of AS and A-Levels they allow their pupils to do to improve stats, so the number of UCAS points isn't a good indicator of quality.
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Worried Pasta
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So why does the gov. want to close them down if they're outperforming the private sector? :sad:
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Worried Pasta
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(Original post by lucho22)
suck me
Yes, and so do most, if not all, grammar schools.
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RadioElectric
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I'd be interested to see the percentages of grammar/private school students who get into Oxbridge universities.
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gumdrop
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I was educated privately from kindergarten to sixteen and then grammar for sixth form.
Grammar was actually the better education, less emphasis was put on how things looked - more on performance.

I'm not at all surprised that grammars have 'won'.
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wer343lit
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(Original post by Worried Pasta)
So why does the gov. want to close them down if they're outperforming the private sector? :sad:
Ideological reasons.
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Elementric
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(Original post by Worried Pasta)
A very interesting article here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...l-ranking.html

Highlights are:







I'm from a poor background, moved from a comprehensive to a grammar and boy am I glad I did. It's so much easier to learn, the atmosphere is so much calmer and more academic - hardly any violence, disturbances in class, excellent support from teachers who don't have to constantly attend to bullies, etc

I wholly support grammar schools - I think they enable so much social mobility and are a credit to Britain. Without them, I wouldn't be off to Oxford next year (pleeeeease God give me AAA!! :o: ); I wouldn't be the person I am now.

Labours argument is that they brand kids as failures? :confused: But what about the private schools, branding us all as failures in terms of parent income?

Discuss.
Why would you feel a failure if the reason you couldn't get into a good school was money rather than talent? :confused:
Although I agree that grammar schools should be encouraged and that Labour's education policies are complete ********.
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lucho22
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(Original post by Worried Pasta)
Yes, and so do most, if not all, grammar schools.
Haha - well as you yourself demonstrate, grades clearly aren't everything, darling.
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anon193
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I go to a private school, and I'm not surprised - it's based around good stats, so there is no room for expansion from students... and you can get even if you're a thick tosser if your parents have enough money...
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Ed.
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Grammar schools and social mobility is doubtful. Considering the large numbers of parents paying for tutoring to pass the 11 plus, it no longer becomes a test of ability but a test of how much your parents can afford to spend on tutoring.

A BBC investigation asking 544 parents found that 433 of them had paid for private tutoring in the run up the to exam. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7789748.stm
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d123
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I'm not surprised to be honest.
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wer343lit
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(Original post by Ed.)
Grammar schools and social mobility is doubtful. Considering the large numbers of parents paying for tutoring to pass the 11 plus, it no longer becomes a test of ability but a test of how much your parents can afford to spend on tutoring.

A BBC investigation asking 544 parents found that 433 of them had paid for private tutoring in the run up the to exam. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7789748.stm
It's more of a test of academic ability than entry into private schools in the current system.
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Ed.
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(Original post by Jonty99)
It's more of a test of academic ability than entry into private schools in the current system.
Well yeah... however the state isn't paying to put a child through private school.

Grammar schools provide a better quality of education than non-grammar schools in general. Middle class parents spending 1800 pounds on tutoring - which poorer families could not afford - are essentially buying there way into the best schools and all under the guise of meritocracy, brilliant !
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shaun12345
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What are those points based on? As far is im aware an A at A level is 120 points, so surely 966 points is 8 A's at A level
Could someone explain please?
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Moghul
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(Original post by d123)
I'm not surprised to be honest.
Yeah, you wouldn't be. :rolleyes:
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