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    (Original post by Entangled)
    I've been brought up to accept that the speed limit is indeed a limit. Both sets (drivers and riders) lose a few privileges with my sympathy if they push beyond the law - both sets are equally at fault, but riders risk a bit more by doing so.

    \ So if im sitting on the inside lane with an idiot trying to kill me as im doing 70 (this has happened you dont think you'd want to get him off your back side by going slightly faster?


    We have to remember, of course, that motorcyclists, from time to time, don't signal either.

    Personally i have not found anywhere near as many bikers who dont signal, as they are very aware in an accident they will be blamed in anyway possible.

    So, vice versa, this makes it difficult for the driver (and indeed other riders) to map out what's happening. From what I've gathered from experience, there seems to be a bit of an opinion, again from time to time, that the motorbike is a lighter vehicle that can accelerate it's way out of trouble. A 125cc can not out accelerate most cars, they dont have the power despite being lighter...and if a lorry pulls into me theres no way i can accelerate out the way..


    Of course, I wouldn't level any of this at the OP. You're pretty unlikely to be speeding on a roundabout (at least at a time where there are other vehicles around). And of course there should be a bit of decency shown on the part of all road users, no matter what they're using at the time. I personally think that a proper first aid course built into all practical tests could do wonders for the situation. I'll agree with you here, both cars and bikes should have a basic understanding, but i also believe everyone should start on a small motorbike to learn how to use the roads.
    Sorry having a bad day with N power
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    *****, driving is the only instance i'm sexist against women.
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    (Original post by Pinturicchio)
    Bikers: Speeding twice the national speed limit and cut up traffic even more than humanly possible. I will laugh every time something bad happens to you.
    If you are one of the few decent ones, I'm sorry brah.
    I'll agree there are idiots, there the ones cutting from the turn right lane to go left to skip a queue, doing 100mph+ down a country lane, but most riders are good, and you dont notice them due to them either being behind you or cars not paying attention, you notice the idiots as their the ones who scare you by trying to kill you, them, and whoever else they can.

    They also pull up next to you at lights and rev the hell out of their bike to scare me... well probably to race me but it still scares me
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    (Original post by Bathwiggle)
    \ So if im sitting on the inside lane with an idiot trying to kill me as im doing 70 (this has happened you dont think you'd want to get him off your back side by going slightly faster?

    Personally i have not found anywhere near as many bikers who dont signal, as they are very aware in an accident they will be blamed in anyway possible.
    Sorry, it's gonna be a bit tricky to get the quotes in - I'll just copy/paste a couple of bits over.

    Firstly, I wouldn't fancy using speed as the answer to everything (especially under the cicumstance of travelling at 70mph already). You could just, y'know, drop back a little bit to gift the car the overtake, if it's that big a deal. Of course (before it is said that this would be a 'dangerous' option) it would be a moderately gradual drop in speed, as opposed to a harsh braking action.

    It's a matter of each to their own (that old phrase, bandied around on here). Many bikers are indeed observant and acutely aware - however, so are many drivers. Unfortunately the bikers get the bad name through the actions of a few and, much in the same vain, drivers also recieve a bad rap for the actions of a select margin. I believe that which camp you belong to is a big factor in your opinion - of course bikers will defend actions (bikers have every right to) but the same also applies to the driving population.
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    (Original post by Entangled)
    Many bikers are indeed observant and acutely aware - however, so are many drivers. Unfortunately the bikers get the bad name through the actions of a few and, much in the same vain, drivers also recieve a bad rap for the actions of a select margin.
    /thread tbh
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    (Original post by CB91)
    Everything I was going to say.

    But tough luck OP, I was once on the back of my dad's back and this **** decided to slam on their brakes at an amber traffic light, hence having to swerve around it and nearly decking it at the same time.

    Drivers have absolutely no appreciation of just how easy it is to be killed on a bike, compared to a car.



    What? So you can be lazy and not look out for bikes?

    Perhaps you shouldn't have been following that car so closely then?
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    (Original post by Greghouse)
    Has this happened to anyone else? Did you insurance kill you the next year?
    That sounds pretty damn horrible . I sympathise you mate.

    Our family went through a similar ordeal, not exactly the same thing but:

    On the way to Cornwall with my family one year, an old fiesta lost it's wheel in front of us and slammed us into the central reservation of the M25. We all got out safely etc. and an Ambulance and the Police turned up.

    The worst part was that the Police told my parents that they didn't think the young lad had insurance. However, we took the guys details (phone number) and then got picked up by the recovery services.

    Later on we find out that the kid has given us a phoney number.

    The Police didn't even follow their instinct and consult the guy on the scene; instead they let a traumatised family deal with it. Absolutely useless.

    This accident cost us in the region of £7,000. . That's minus the amount we spent on a new car a few months later. The car (which we'd bought new about a year previously) was written off.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    Perhaps you shouldn't have been following that car so closely then?
    We werent, but the stupid driver decided to slam on the brakes as hard as they could a few metres before the traffic lights, leaving not enough room to break without avoiding eating the rear windscreen.
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    You should leave enough space to accommodate such occurrences. If you go into the back of someone it is pretty much always your own fault. You left 'not enough room to brake', not the driver.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    You should leave enough space to accommodate such occurrences. If you go into the back of someone it is pretty much always your own fault. You left 'not enough room to brake', not the driver.
    To be fair, that's how it's worked in the insurance claims. The fault of the driver behind in such incidences, however much we can disagree.
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    (Original post by Entangled)
    Well, if it counts for anything, you can have the full measure of my limited sympathy for motorcyclists. I say that (without assuming that you fall under this bracket) after seeing a good few mad bikers screaming down country roads at silly speeds and then demanding action when the laws of physics drag them back (and down).

    So I'm counter-venting.
    There are a good few mad car drivers who also go screaming down country lanes as well......
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    (Original post by joseph1991)
    drive a car? bikes are so last century...but really, bikes shouldnt be allowed on roads for actual vehicles x
    what on earth are you talking about
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    (Original post by mr_cool)
    what on earth are you talking about
    Lol who knows!

    Some people say silly things...
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    (Original post by Bong-Bong)
    I went flying off my bike the other day.




    Bicycle, I mean.

    A graceful somersault over the handlebars.

    And the pedestrian observing the whole event some 4 feet away from me promptly ran back inside his house without a word, and stayed there.
    hahaha
    you ok?
    but yeah I think I would have laughed my head off if I saw that
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    You've just been the victim of a PG rating drive-by :yep:
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    what a ***** i hope you get her
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    (Original post by x_dwin_ffeimys_x)
    hahaha
    you ok?
    but yeah I think I would have laughed my head off if I saw that
    I'm fine, barring a few booboos.

    Seems the threadstarter got off worse than me.

    And I wouldn't have minded a laugh on the spectator's end, as long as it wasn't too malicious and he tried to help in some way afterwards.

    But no - he stood stony faced, and then ran off.
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    (Original post by Samalama)
    That sounds pretty damn horrible . I sympathise you mate.

    Our family went through a similar ordeal, not exactly the same thing but:

    On the way to Cornwall with my family one year, an old fiesta lost it's wheel in front of us and slammed us into the central reservation of the M25. We all got out safely etc. and an Ambulance and the Police turned up.

    The worst part was that the Police told my parents that they didn't think the young lad had insurance. However, we took the guys details (phone number) and then got picked up by the recovery services.

    Later on we find out that the kid has given us a phoney number.

    The Police didn't even follow their instinct and consult the guy on the scene; instead they let a traumatised family deal with it. Absolutely useless.

    This accident cost us in the region of £7,000. . That's minus the amount we spent on a new car a few months later. The car (which we'd bought new about a year previously) was written off.
    That sucks man ... It's just not right!
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    Ouch!
    Sorry to hear that mate, god I'd be sooo angry if someone failed to stop.

    Grrr.


    I'll increase your amount of gems if it makes you feel better heheh.

    *pos reps*
    Pos rep for sympathy! I like that idea! haha
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    (Original post by Greghouse)
    Didn't get her number plate nor did anyone else. As far as I can work out I was too busy eating the inside of my bike helmet and watching the tarmac, everyone else seemed to be watching me hitting the tarmac.

    An ambulance and the police was called but the police just took a statement and said they there's probs not much they'd be able to do and that she was most likely not insured!! F*ing awsome!
    Sorry to hear about this.You can be your bolloxs though if you'd been the chief constables son or the local MP's son , they would be hunting for her.

    Only thing you can do as others suggested is, go back same place same time if you can be bothered and try to spot her, as she might be stupid enough not to change her route. I expect there is some damage to her car also that the Police can use. Leaving the scene of an accident without giving details is an criminal offence. It's particularly naughty when she didn't know the state you were in as motorcyclists are in a very vunerable position.
 
 
 
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