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    Any words of advice are welcome, as I'm struggling somewhat with my draft. I have read the criteria, but feel as if my writing may be too descriptive.

    How did you put to use secondary sources? What did these include? (interviews from authors, other literary texts?)

    Thanks for any help!
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    (Original post by RunningUpThatHill)
    Any words of advice are welcome, as I'm struggling somewhat with my draft. I have read the criteria, but feel as if my writing may be too descriptive.

    How did you put to use secondary sources? What did these include? (interviews from authors, other literary texts?)

    Thanks for any help!
    I used a lexicon, and criticism by I think 1 expert on my author.... and then a part of my authors biography- as it is needed to understand her point of view.

    Other than that, I tried using as little outside sources as possible.
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    You could use a) criticisms on the work (e.g. Harold Bloom), b) additional unnecessary sources e.g. Hamlet quote & c) technical sources e.g. definition, biographical info etc.

    Generally, all you "need" is/are the book/s you are reading and working with.
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    (Original post by nk9230)
    I used a lexicon, and criticism by I think 1 expert on my author.... and then a part of my authors biography- as it is needed to understand her point of view.

    Other than that, I tried using as little outside sources as possible.
    That's good to hear, I was really worried about having next to no outside sources, especially since I'm only doing my EE on one novel.

    Thanks for the suggestions!
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    (Original post by ragnar_jonsson)
    You could use a) criticisms on the work (e.g. Harold Bloom), b) additional unnecessary sources e.g. Hamlet quote & c) technical sources e.g. definition, biographical info etc.

    Generally, all you "need" is/are the book/s you are reading and working with.
    That's what I was thinking of - quoting another novel/a poet/something to make a point, so it would just be one sentence.
    Is this a good idea or completely pointless?
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    (Original post by RunningUpThatHill)
    That's what I was thinking of - quoting another novel/a poet/something to make a point, so it would just be one sentence.
    Is this a good idea or completely pointless?
    I didn't use much in terms of secondary sources, but I did reference one article on the book that talked about its symbolism. For most books, you can find some reviews and/or criticism pieces online, although you may need access to journals to do so.

    I don't think they expect much in terms of secondary sources, but I wouldn't put something in if it is not tied to your main points. What books are you writing on?
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    The Life of Pi by Yann Martel. It's quite a common book, but I think I have a fairly unique topic. (not the whole religious thing)

    The author doesn't really have a biography, but if i was reading up on, say, existentialism or creative license, would I reference the sites I used for background info? Or is that unnecessary?

    Sorry for asking so many questions, it's only my school's second year at the IB so I'm fairly clueless!

    & out of interest, what did you do/are you doing for your EE?
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    (Original post by RunningUpThatHill)
    The author doesn't really have a biography, but if i was reading up on, say, existentialism or creative license, would I reference the sites I used for background info? Or is that unnecessary?
    Yes, you do reference the sources used for background info - even if you never quote from them and just read them for an overview of the subject, it's important to state where you're getting your information from. For example, mine was on sexism in EM Forster's A Passage to India, and I referenced sites on women's roles and duties in 1920's India, as well as another book about the British Raj in general, even though I only quoted from the book.

    If you can find any critical commentaries on the novel that relate to your topic (even better if they support your argument), use and reference those as well. Also don't forget to reference the novel itself :p:

    That's what I was thinking of - quoting another novel/a poet/something to make a point, so it would just be one sentence.
    Is this a good idea or completely pointless?
    Depends on the quote and how you're using it. If it relates to your topic then go ahead, but don't use a random quote that's really got nothing to do with your topic in order to fill up space, because they may take off marks for not having a focused argument. Remember that there's no lower word limit (although if it's less than 3000 words you may need to expand your argument a little), but there IS an upper limit, and 4000 words is not actually as much as you'd think. More people in my year had issues trying to cut bits out than filling up the space - and examiners will cut marks if it runs over 4000 words.
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    As schnargle said, you would reference any sources you used in writing the essay, even if you never quote them directly. If you are using MLA format, then you should use embedded citations referencing the source that you got the idea from whenever you talk about it. For example, if you were to say something like, "In "The Life of Pi", Martel alludes to two existential ideas: x and y" you would put a citation at the end of that sentence even if the ideas are not directly quoted from the book.

    (Original post by schnargle)
    Depends on the quote and how you're using it. If it relates to your topic then go ahead, but don't use a random quote that's really got nothing to do with your topic in order to fill up space, because they may take off marks for not having a focused argument. Remember that there's no lower word limit (although if it's less than 3000 words you may need to expand your argument a little), but there IS an upper limit, and 4000 words is not actually as much as you'd think. More people in my year had issues trying to cut bits out than filling up the space - and examiners will cut marks if it runs over 4000 words.
    I'm not sure how the EE regulations work, but in my experience direct quotes usually do not count towards the word count for academic papers.

    I did my EE in English, on a comparison between The Old Man and the Sea and One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. I think the only point at which I used a secondary source was when talking about the symbolism of the old man at the end of the story (Jesus imagery, etc.)

    You can also use literary dictionaries to define literary terms (such as existentialism) if you feel that definitions would help your point.

    If you still have trouble with the secondary sources, feel free to PM me your topic and I can try to find some relevant journal articles for you.
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    please post in http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=996723
    from now on. thank you.
 
 
 
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