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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    Oh sorry if it seemed like a was belittling you . I don't know how to respond to what you said without sounding like a jerk or like i'm patronising you, so I will say tc and cya. (I don't feel like digging a hole)

    You sound like a nice person though
    I was worried I'd offended you with that post :o: so don't worry! Upon looking back it could've been interpreted completely differently - did you mean like, you didn't think something like symmetry could be that bad, as in sympathetic. OK, that's better, I'm happy now

    Don't worry about it - you haven't upset me, just warning you to never belittle OCD (or mental health difficulties in general). You probably won't ever understand it, and for that you should be very grateful :p:
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    (Original post by jennikay)
    I was worried I'd offended you with that post :o: so don't worry! Upon looking back it could've been interpreted completely differently - did you mean like, you didn't think something like symmetry could be that bad, as in sympathetic. OK, that's better, I'm happy now

    Don't worry about it - you haven't upset me, just warning you to never belittle OCD (or mental health difficulties in general). You probably won't ever understand it, and for that you should be very grateful :p:
    No you didn't offend me. I meant that something like symmetry wasn't bad because many people do things according to size etc without being OCD. I hope I haven't re-offended you.

    I would never belittle a disease as the person didn't choose to get it and doesn't have a choice. You seem nice though.
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    (Original post by Thomasmc135)
    No you didn't offend me. I meant that something like symmetry wasn't bad because many people do things according to size etc without being OCD. I hope I haven't re-offended you.

    I would never belittle a disease as the person didn't choose to get it and doesn't have a choice. You seem nice though.
    Yeah, I see what you mean I understand now :p:
    Don't worry about it
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    (Original post by lowrax)
    This last year was my first year at university. I made no friends (perhaps one or two people who I spoke to at lectures)and had no social life.
    More importantly I became very depressed, I had few contact hours and little work so a lot of spare time. I spent most of it either sleeping so that I didn't have to think/feel or shovelling food away. I felt suicidal most days.
    Now that I'm back home I'm feeling a little better but still very depressed. I want to want to live but I have no motivation for life.
    I've left the university and am starting somewhere new, I'm feeling quite positive about this but I'm also terrified that my surroundings may change but that's not going to change me and my faulty coping mechanisms. I could go see somebody there but I'm terribly shy (hence not making friends!) and the likelihood is that I wouldn't be able to get any words out when faced by a doctor.

    I'm a nice person really, I'm not a complete headcase! I don't know what I'm looking for, maybe advice, or cheery own experiences that promise me everything will work out for the better?

    Edit: Dammit that was meant to be anon! Fail.
    I think moving university was a great idea.. It allows you to start again.. But I think you need a little more confidence when approaching people because that helps people approach you too and make friends with you. Friends at university is really important because that will basically be your family for as long as you stay on university.. Especially when you live on campus.

    When you start the uni, I suggest you record your moods and note down improvements. If things don't improve I suggest you take the mood journal to a professional. Make sure you have enough detail on it as possible so that they can almost figure our what's wrong. Do answer questions though.. Feelings of suicide is dangerous and has to be taken seriously. You may be getting counselling or coping strategies from the doctors.. I have bipolar disorder (severe ups and severe downs, mania and lows, caused by neurotransmitter imbalance). It's very debilitating as it affects my functioning, but it doesn't change who I am unless I'm manc or depressive. So I always record my moods and check out my triggers to reduce them.. Suicidal feelings are common in me but when it gets really bad I have to get hospitalised..

    Anyways, I hope it works out for you! I hope I gave you OK advice.. Take care and good luck. =)
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    (Original post by KumakoXsd)
    I think moving university was a great idea.. It allows you to start again.. But I think you need a little more confidence when approaching people because that helps people approach you too and make friends with you. Friends at university is really important because that will basically be your family for as long as you stay on university.. Especially when you live on campus.

    When you start the uni, I suggest you record your moods and note down improvements. If things don't improve I suggest you take the mood journal to a professional. Make sure you have enough detail on it as possible so that they can almost figure our what's wrong. Do answer questions though.. Feelings of suicide is dangerous and has to be taken seriously. You may be getting counselling or coping strategies from the doctors.. I have bipolar disorder (severe ups and severe downs, mania and lows, caused by neurotransmitter imbalance). It's very debilitating as it affects my functioning, but it doesn't change who I am unless I'm manc or depressive. So I always record my moods and check out my triggers to reduce them.. Suicidal feelings are common in me but when it gets really bad I have to get hospitalised..

    Anyways, I hope it works out for you! I hope I gave you OK advice.. Take care and good luck. =)
    Thank you very much
    Not meaning to 'self-diagnose' a serious mental health problem but I do sometimes wonder if I suffer from Bipolar (I think type II?) before this year of depression I spent two years almost constantly 'buzzing' (sorry, I'm not very articulate!), I was constantly busy and motivated. I also developed Anorexia which I believe is often co-morbid with bipolar. Anyway, that aside Thank you! I'm hoping I don't sound completely crazy
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    Sorry for hijacking a bit lowrax :o:
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    (Original post by jennikay)
    Sorry for hijacking a bit lowrax :o:
    Don't worry about it! It's good that people get to learn about mental health problems, it's still a hush-hush taboo subject which is sad
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    (Original post by lowrax)
    Thank you very much
    Not meaning to 'self-diagnose' a serious mental health problem but I do sometimes wonder if I suffer from Bipolar (I think type II?) before this year of depression I spent two years almost constantly 'buzzing' (sorry, I'm not very articulate!), I was constantly busy and motivated. I also developed Anorexia which I believe is often co-morbid with bipolar. Anyway, that aside Thank you! I'm hoping I don't sound completely crazy
    You're right! Many other mental illnesses accompany bipolar.. I have psychosis - delusions and paranoia. I hope it'll work out for you.. I don't mind you sounding 'crazy'.. I sound that way all the time.. But if things don't resolve.. Don't hesitate to get help.
 
 
 
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