How many semesters in a university year? Watch

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jakeuk1
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I will be going into my first year this September to study BSc Psychology at Exeter University and am a little confused with regards to the timetable.

After browsing my first year course content, it gives a breakdown of my modules over Semester 1 and Semester 2. Okay, fine, so far that sounds alright.

However, there are 3 terms which are as follows;

Autumn Term: Mon 5 October – Fri 18 December
Spring Term: Mon 11 January – Thu 1 Apr
Summer Term: Mon 3 May – Fri 18 June

Initially I thought that each term was classed as a semester, and as such, my modules would be divided evenly amongst these. But how would this work? Does Semester 1 run from the Autumn term and half way through the Spring term and then Semester 2 starts from the midway point of the Spring term and finishes at the end of the Summer term?

Sorry if this is quite an obvious question - just wanna make sure I know what's what before I go
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lolimemma
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summer term will PROBABLY be exam period with autumn and spring term being semester 1 & 2 and summer term being semester 3
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Spacecam
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Two semesters, usually four "terms"
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cpj1987
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There are two semesters in a university year, and some also split these into three terms. Generally, semester one goes up to Christmas, and semester two from New Year until the summer. The terms generally match this, with the third term being an exam period at the end of semester two.
Some universities only use semesters, some only use terms, some use both.
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JME10
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At my uni its technically 3; Autumn, Spring and Summer although the Summer semester is generally the exam semester.
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jakeuk1
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An entire semester for exams? Yeesh ...
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coldfusion
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I always thought there's 2 semesters and 3 terms in a year
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jakeuk1
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(Original post by coldfusion)
I always thought there's 2 semesters and 3 terms in a year
Initially I thought the two were one of the same. However, after some of the replies I've read on here, I guess my first two terms will be module based and my third will be comprised of revision/exams and whatnot.
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sherozk
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so exams after first semester when does one do them. At the end of semester 2 or Semester 1?
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jelly1000
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(Original post by sherozk)
so exams after first semester when does one do them. At the end of semester 2 or Semester 1?
It's entirely university dependant. Some universities have exams in December at the end of semester 1, some have them in January before semester 2 starts and some don't have January exams at all (like UEA (my uni)). Virtually all universities have summer exams in May or June but not for all courses.
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oliver477
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Most US universities have the tri-semester system - the fall, spring, and summer. Each semester is around four months.

The fall semester (Starts in AUG/SEP) This is the first semester of the year, which starts mid-August and is less often called the autumn semester. The academic year begins in this semester, and most aid and assistantships are offered during this period. Moreover, most new intake is during this period.

The summer semester (Starts around beginning of Jun) This is the shortest of the three semesters and spans for two months and usually, starts in June. Very few universities have summer intake. Although the university, on the whole, may have summer intake, make sure the department accepts new students (this applies to spring as well). In several cases, regular students do not enroll for this semester and work full-time on campus (40 hrs/week) or take up industrial training.
You could also find some info here

The thesis and non-thesis option This is mostly applicable to MS students. A thesis option requires taking up a thesis, and at the end of which, a dissertation (should have a genuine or original idea) has to be presented and defended orally. This is a must for students enrolling to masters programs leading to a doctorate (Direct doctorate after under graduation). It is advisable for students having a desire, to pursuit up to doctorate level at a later stage, to choose this option. Non-thesis option typically requires a project to be completed by the end of the course. Student's opting the project option on an average graduate in 4 semesters (1.5 years), and with a thesis option it takes on an average two years, with exceptions in both the cases.

What are credit hours? The US system usually allows a student to choose papers (apart from some mandatory essential papers) And each paper will carry a certain number of credits say 3 or 4 (in the case of a project it would be 5 or 6). When the student full fills the required number of credits; he or she graduates. In most universities, this requisite is 30 to 36 hrs for Non-thesis (usually carries a project) option. But for the thesis option, this requisite is much lesser, but with a thesis work to be presented.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by oliver477)
snip
Please don't bump old threads (this one is nearly 5 years old). No matter how well-intentioned, it is against forum rules. Thread closed.
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