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UCL Msc Economics 2012....Who is going?

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    Anyone waiting for decision or already admitted??
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    or rejected
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    (Original post by fourdigit)
    or rejected
    rejected fourdigit?...well sorry to hear that, are you waiting for any other offers?
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    (Original post by Econla)
    Anyone waiting for decision or already admitted??
    I got an offer last week
    But I'm still waiting to hear from LSE and Oxford.
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    (Original post by AlexandreFrance)
    I got an offer last week
    But I'm still waiting to hear from LSE and Oxford.
    good for you, I didn't apply to LSE or Oxbridge so I think Iim going to accept UCL offer
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    By the way, Oxford is 2 years, you don't mind?
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    (Original post by Econla)
    By the way, Oxford is 2 years, you don't mind?
    Yes it is 2 years, it is too long. Even if I get an offer, I do not really want to go there. I might change my mind if I get an offer from LSE, but UCL remains my first option.
    The programme is perfectly suited to my research interests
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    (Original post by Econla)
    By the way, Oxford is 2 years, you don't mind?
    Are you from a university in the United Kingdom?
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    (Original post by AlexandreFrance)
    Are you from a university in the United Kingdom?
    No, LATAM
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    (Original post by AlexandreFrance)
    Yes it is 2 years, it is too long. Even if I get an offer, I do not really want to go there. I might change my mind if I get an offer from LSE, but UCL remains my first option.
    The programme is perfectly suited to my research interests
    Then, see you in september?
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    (Original post by Econla)
    Then, see you in september?
    Yeah probably
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    (Original post by Econla)
    Anyone waiting for decision or already admitted??
    I'll be going! Is anyone else studying with the intention of working as an economist straight after graduation, or are a lot thinking of PhD afterwards? I intend to work in consultancy afterwards and a lot of UCL grads do, but the site says it's suited to people who want to do a PhD... I also hold a Warwick offer but UCL>Warwick in general for MSc Econ...
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    Congrat!!!!......I am not quite sure about a PhD afterwards, I think that I will realize in the programme but most likely I believe I will continue developing my career in IB, but this time in London if possible.....I hope . I also think that UCL>>Warwick not only for economics, but overall. In QS is ranked 7 in the world, I don't know where Warwick is (I have an offer too but for MFE).
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    (Original post by andydb)
    I'll be going! Is anyone else studying with the intention of working as an economist straight after graduation, or are a lot thinking of PhD afterwards? I intend to work in consultancy afterwards and a lot of UCL grads do, but the site says it's suited to people who want to do a PhD... I also hold a Warwick offer but UCL>Warwick in general for MSc Econ...
    I would like to continue onto a PhD but I guess it will depend on my academic performance next year.
    Between UCL and Warwick, I would choose UCL. Both are very good universities, but UCL is more prestigious at the international level.
    As far as economics is concerned, I think it's harder to get an offer from UCL and UCL has a better RAE rank.
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    A bit scary isn't it?

    Man, I believe 25% could be true but if you start preparing yourself from now on a constantly rate, I think you shouldn't have problems, plus it is a challenge, I go with a government scholarship so in the case I fail, I have to payback all the money :eek:, so failure is not an option
    If you are very good at maths, at the level of both math courses in the UG programme, then work with the intuition side, and so the opposite.

    Obviously we will need to work hard, but this is the cost/benefit tradeoff. Specially in your case where you want to do a PhD afterwards.

    Now if you just simply want to put on your cv the words "Msc in Economics", then pick some other less rigorous programme.
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    An advice. For the first five weeks, attend both MSc Economics and MSc Economic Policy lectures. If you find yourself can't cope with the MSc Economics, switch to MSc Economic Policy immediately during the first five weeks. If you can't even cope with the core modules, you will be devastated in the second term for advanced modules.
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    An advice. For the first five weeks, attend both MSc Economics and MSc Economic Policy lectures. If you find yourself can't cope with the MSc Economics, switch to MSc Economic Policy immediately during the first five weeks. If you can't even cope with the core modules, you will be devastated in the second term for advanced modules.
    Thanks for your advice . Are you a current MSc student?

    (Original post by Econla)
    A bit scary isn't it?

    Man, I believe 25% could be true but if you start preparing yourself from now on a constantly rate, I think you shouldn't have problems, plus it is a challenge, I go with a government scholarship so in the case I fail, I have to payback all the money :eek:, so failure is not an option
    If you are very good at maths, at the level of both math courses in the UG programme, then work with the intuition side, and so the opposite.

    Obviously we will need to work hard, but this is the cost/benefit tradeoff. Specially in your case where you want to do a PhD afterwards.

    Now if you just simply want to put on your cv the words "Msc in Economics", then pick some other less rigorous programme.
    Yes you are right man. I really want to go to UCL, I will work hard.
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    An advice. For the first five weeks, attend both MSc Economics and MSc Economic Policy lectures. If you find yourself can't cope with the MSc Economics, switch to MSc Economic Policy immediately during the first five weeks. If you can't even cope with the core modules, you will be devastated in the second term for advanced modules.
    Can you say how much easier and less mathematical Policy is? I have tried to access the course materials on Moodle, but unlike Economics most of Policy is closed to unregistered lookers.
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    (Original post by Econla)
    If you are very good at maths, at the level of both math courses in the UG programme, then work with the intuition side, and so the opposite.
    What do you mean, "both math courses"? There are a lot more than two math courses needed to prepare for this program. I took five and I still feel like it is not enough (Precal I, Precal II, Cal I, Cal II, Linear Algebra). Should have taken Differential Equations I and II and Real Analysis I and II, that would make it total of 9 math courses.

    Obviously we will need to work hard, but this is the cost/benefit tradeoff. Specially in your case where you want to do a PhD afterwards.

    Now if you just simply want to put on your cv the words "Msc in Economics", then pick some other less rigorous programme.
    If the program is less rigorous the employers will know it, too.
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    (Original post by janjanmmm)
    What do you mean, "both math courses"? There are a lot more than two math courses needed to prepare for this program. I took five and I still feel like it is not enough (Precal I, Precal II, Cal I, Cal II, Linear Algebra). Should have taken Differential Equations I and II and Real Analysis I and II, that would make it total of 9 math courses.



    If the program is less rigorous the employers will know it, too.
    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/under...te/module-list

    Yes, but for someone in IB, the requirement is not so rigorous as for someone who applies for a PhD I believe.

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