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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Meh. I feel like I can "feel" the ball perfectly well with my racquet. I've certainly never been surprised as to where it has ended up. Its all a big con, I bet most squash players couldn't tell the difference between a cheap racquet and an expensive racquet in a blind test.
    Maybe what you could do is actually try one of the racquets out for maybe 3 to 4 weeks and then switch back to your original racquet, you may realise the difference then?
    At the end of the day, its all down to personal preference.. but you will never know unless you try it out.
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    (Original post by Mr Bee)
    How do you know when you need a new racket?
    A few things you need to check:

    Check around the frame to see if you have any scratches or actuall tears, if it a big one then you may well need to look for one soon as it only takes one shot of the wall to snap it..

    Strings are also important, move them from side to side, andif you find that you were able to move them fairly easy then they may need replacing. When doing this, note that the strings are meant to be tight, so if you hear the noise of one strings rubbing against another then you may be okay.. Just make frequent checks on it..
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Meh. I feel like I can "feel" the ball perfectly well with my racquet. I've certainly never been surprised as to where it has ended up. Its all a big con, I bet most squash players couldn't tell the difference between a cheap racquet and an expensive racquet in a blind test.
    (Original post by py0alb)
    At least with golf there's a discernible difference between equipment: this driver hits the ball 20 yards further than this one etc. But with squash, its all subjective and nebulous rubbish like "touch" and "feel" that may or may not have something to do with the racquet.
    Good for you, must feel great to save money on a squash racket whilst people like me pay for 'subjective rubbish'. If you ask me it sounds like you've never hit a ball with a racket worth over £30. If you had I think you would be more understanding of what myself and others are saying.
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    (Original post by Doughnut)
    Good for you, must feel great to save money on a squash racket whilst people like me pay for 'subjective rubbish'. If you ask me it sounds like you've never hit a ball with a racket worth over £30. If you had I think you would be more understanding of what myself and others are saying.
    I've just asked "how are they better" and no-one has really come up with a coherent answer. The best we've got is "you can hit the ball harder" to which I reply "I already hit the ball hard enough" and "the ball goes where you want it to go" to which I reply "the ball already goes where I want it to go" (or at least, when it doesn't it wasn't the racquet at fault, it was me not concentrating properly).

    So we still haven't established what advantage there is in a more expensive racquet. One would think that if they were so much better, then someone might be able to be more specific reason than generic advertising blurb about "touch" and "feel".
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    Well if its specs your looking for why didnt you ask?

    Usually the racquet is based upon three things:

    Weight of the racquet
    Size of the head
    Comp
    and to a lesser extent. the factory string,

    Most racquets tend to improve these four aspects of a racquet... so for example you had the:
    Dunlop areogel mfil pro and then the aerogel 4d.. surely theres going to be a difference..?

    Different racquets are made for different purposes. Just like the aerogel ultra, that racquet was perfect for drop shots and ccatching the nick, whereas the aerogel pro is more of a sturdy racquet allowing you to hit the ball cleaner when going for a drive..



    Usually they tend to make products better, therefore the price being higher.. like any company would

    And a final point, NO-ONE can hit a ball hard enough in a proper squash match through personal experience..
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I've just asked "how are they better" and no-one has really come up with a coherent answer. The best we've got is "you can hit the ball harder" to which I reply "I already hit the ball hard enough" and "the ball goes where you want it to go" to which I reply "the ball already goes where I want it to go" (or at least, when it doesn't it wasn't the racquet at fault, it was me not concentrating properly).

    So we still haven't established what advantage there is in a more expensive racquet. One would think that if they were so much better, then someone might be able to be more specific reason than generic advertising blurb about "touch" and "feel".
    'touch' isn't generic advertising blurb, it is just something that's hard to explain. It's very much to do with control, which is what a better racket gives you. You may be able to hit the ball hard enough and put it where you want, but with a good quality racket you'd be able to do both of those things more consistently.

    Another thing to bear in mind is the lighter rackets are much more agile. This has the advantage of allowing you to volley balls that you'd perhaps need to leave and retrieve from the back with a heavier, harder to maneuver racket.

    Out of interest, what racket do you have?
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    Doughnut, have you been playing for long, whats your player profile like?
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    (Original post by Doughnut)
    'touch' isn't generic advertising blurb, it is just something that's hard to explain. It's very much to do with control, which is what a better racket gives you. You may be able to hit the ball hard enough and put it where you want, but with a good quality racket you'd be able to do both of those things more consistently.

    Another thing to bear in mind is the lighter rackets are much more agile. This has the advantage of allowing you to volley balls that you'd perhaps need to leave and retrieve from the back with a heavier, harder to maneuver racket.

    Out of interest, what racket do you have?
    A Wilson something or other. It has a handle at one end with an W (or M) and some strings stretched across an oval frame at the other end.

    I don't know what weight it is but compared to wielding a 3lb cricket bat it feels like I'm waving around an imaginary twig.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    A Wilson something or other. It has a handle at one end with an W (or M) and some strings stretched across an oval frame at the other end.

    I don't know what weight it is but compared to wielding a 3lb cricket bat it feels like I'm waving around an imaginary twig.
    Strongly recommend you to try either a dunlop or prince racquet and you will feel the difference in your game.
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    (Original post by Hazz1)
    Strongly recommend you to try either a dunlop or prince racquet and you will feel the difference in your game.
    What will happen? :eek:
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    What will happen? :eek:
    It'll change your life! I mean game. On a more serious note, Im not discrediting your racquet, it probably is a very good racquet. However, wilson aren't very well known to make the best racquets of today. That's why I would recommend the original brands..

    And I don't know if you read my post about the racquet specs but above i explained why a racquet of today will be of better use.. Hopefully that might give you an insight into why an expensive racquet is usually better than older racquet.. Post#45
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    (Original post by Hazz1)
    It'll change your life! I mean game. On a more serious note, Im not discrediting your racquet, it probably is a very good racquet. However, wilson aren't very well known to make the best racquets of today. That's why I would recommend the original brands..

    And I don't know if you read my post about the racquet specs but above i explained why a racquet of today will be of better use.. Hopefully that might give you an insight into why an expensive racquet is usually better than older racquet.. Post#45
    Wilsons are good rackets. At the end of the day it's down to personal preference; I never get on with the shape of the prince racket heads and dunlops are great but too pricey for me. I settled for the one below, which I get on with really well.
    http://www.sweatband.com/wilson-tour...sh-racket.html
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    (Original post by Doughnut)
    Wilsons are good rackets. At the end of the day it's down to personal preference; I never get on with the shape of the prince racket heads and dunlops are great but too pricey for me. I settled for the one below, which I get on with really well.
    http://www.sweatband.com/wilson-tour...sh-racket.html
    Yeah mate, im not denying they are good racquets, theyre brilliant in fact, I just pointed out that theyre not the 'norm' racquets to get, And i absolutely agree, the dunlop racquets are the priciest ones.

    I said it before it is down to personal preference and agree!
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    Anyone got any good tips then? Drive down the wall until your opponent starts hanging back, then boast/drive/drop to the opposite corner?
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Anyone got any good tips then? Drive down the wall until your opponent starts hanging back, then boast/drive/drop to the opposite corner?
    There's so many combinations you can do, the best thing to do is to keep your opponent at the back of the court so repetitive drives, whilsts doing this make sure you retreat to the 'T' by keeping him at the back you will be able to catch the nick on a drop...

    BUT there's no way of giving you a game strategy, it really depends on your opponent, you have to see hoe he plays, whether he moves around the court swiftly, or hes not so good at backhand shots, is he good at the front of the court?

    When you realise what his weakness is then you will be realise what shots to play
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I've just asked "how are they better" and no-one has really come up with a coherent answer. The best we've got is "you can hit the ball harder" to which I reply "I already hit the ball hard enough" and "the ball goes where you want it to go" to which I reply "the ball already goes where I want it to go" (or at least, when it doesn't it wasn't the racquet at fault, it was me not concentrating properly).

    So we still haven't established what advantage there is in a more expensive racquet. One would think that if they were so much better, then someone might be able to be more specific reason than generic advertising blurb about "touch" and "feel".
    So you think that you can hit it as hard as a professional player?

    Do you feel the same way about tennis racquets?
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    (Original post by tface)
    So you think that you can hit it as hard as a professional player?

    Do you feel the same way about tennis racquets?
    I can probably hit it harder than some professional players, yes, seeing as most professional squash players aren't 6'3 and well built. Its irrelevant though, as unlike men's tennis, squash isn't really a game about power.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I can probably hit it harder than some professional players, yes, seeing as most professional squash players aren't 6'3 and well built. Its irrelevant though, as unlike men's tennis, squash isn't really a game about power.
    Seriously doubt it :/
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    (Original post by Hazz1)
    Seriously doubt it :/
    The difference between an amateur and a professional squash player is not how hard they can hit it. There's a lot more to the game than just bashing the **** into the ball.

    I can also hit a cricket ball harder than many professional cricketers. Is that really so hard to believe?
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    If he says he can, believe him?

    I'm liking the tips side of things rather than argueing..

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