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PPE at Durham

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    I've heard rumours that the PPE course at Durham isn't upto the standard of other non-Oxbridge universities offering the same course, such as Warwick for example.
    I was hoping that a current PPE student could shed some light on these rumours, as to be honest Durham was one of my favorite choices.
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    I don't do it but I've heard the course is very well respected. It may have a slightly worse reputation because apparently Durham's Politics department isn't as strong as some it's others e.g. History and English where they rival Oxbridge.
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    PPE at Durham is on par with other non-Oxford universities offering the course.

    To be honest, the course content in any of the top 10 universities for PPE is unlikely to be radically different. There are however, subtle differences in the delivery methods, assessment and wider support available for students.

    Naturally, Oxford has the most renowned and arguably most effective delivery system with personalised tutorials with the leading academics in the field (alongside lectures of course) - everywhere else it's all pretty much the same - lectures + seminars with pretty damn good, although perhaps less renowned staff.

    Assessment at Oxford however, is different to everywhere else as all of their summative exams happen at the end of their final year. At Durham, we study 6 modules per year - the exams for which we have at the end of each academic year. Other universities, such as Warwick and York, have a more 'continuous' assessment with exams at the end of each term. This allows them to have arguably more flexible programmes - with more, smaller modules being studied during any given year, but of course, that means more exams.

    As for the more ambiguous category of 'support', Durham and York have established extensive societies that seek to reinforce the course on academic and social grounds that make them stand out from other PPE courses in the land. Or at least that's what we like to think.

    Anyway, the point is, at good universities the differences in what you learn and how you learn it will be minimal. What will differ greatly will be the overall atmosphere of the place so it's best to visit as many institutions as possible to find out where you fit in.
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    (Original post by Jackson07)
    I've heard rumours that the PPE course at Durham isn't upto the standard of other non-Oxbridge universities offering the same course, such as Warwick for example.
    I was hoping that a current PPE student could shed some light on these rumours, as to be honest Durham was one of my favorite choices.
    Rubbish.

    Philosophy is an excellent department (better than Warwick's in my opinion), economics is still an excellent department (not far off Warwick standard and certainly the next best thng outside the elite five) and I'm the first to admit Durham's politics department is one of its weaker departments it's still no weaker than Warwick's (and far from a poor department).

    PPE in general is a respected degree and Durham is a resepct uni. Can't fail to win.

    I don't study PPE (I couldn't handle the economics), philosophy and politics is my area. I don't think you should have too many concerns. In my opinion (and the opinion of most others) Durham, York, Warwick etc. are all pretty similar in terms of "reputation" (though that is quite abstract) and course content and style. Durham has its own unique benefits though (as outlined by Foxius).

    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    I don't do it but I've heard the course is very well respected. It may have a slightly worse reputation because apparently Durham's Politics department isn't as strong as some it's others e.g. History and English where they rival Oxbridge.
    Physics, chemistry and other sciences (plus law) too. It's not all about the arts.
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    (Original post by River85)
    I don't study PPE (I couldn't handle the economics), philosophy and politics is my area. I don't think you should have too many concerns. In my opinion (and the opinion of most others) Durham, York, Warwick etc. are all pretty similar in terms of "reputation" (though that is quite abstract) and course content and style. Durham has its own unique benefits though (as outlined by Foxius)
    How you can be interested in politics and (the practical application of) philosophy, but not economics, is always rather strange to me.

    also@ OP: I wasn't aware that a Uni like Durham did anything badly, lol.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    How you can be interested in politics and (the practical application of) philosophy, but not economics, is always rather strange to me.
    I'm a postgraduate in politics, and hate economics with a passion. Maybe its just the maths.
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    (Original post by Socrates)
    I'm a postgraduate in politics, and hate economics with a passion. Maybe its just the maths.
    :yep:
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    (Original post by Socrates)
    I'm a postgraduate in politics, and hate economics with a passion. Maybe its just the maths.
    I thought the maths in Economics was supposed to be rather basic, unless you choose to do more?
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    I thought the maths in Economics was supposed to be rather basic, unless you choose to do more?
    The mere thought of Maths is enough to scare us arteests :p:.
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    There's the maths, true - but its practically impossible to logically follow a political ideology and ignore economics.
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    (Original post by *River)
    The mere thought of Maths is enough to scare us arteests :p:.
    Thats why Politics is classed as a social science
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    I thought the maths in Economics was supposed to be rather basic, unless you choose to do more?
    Basic by our standards perhaps. But you have to remember many artsy people just can't handle maths full stop.

    (For anyone insulted, the reverse is also true. Particularly in my case.)
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    (Original post by Itchynscratchy)
    Basic by our standards perhaps. But you have to remember many artsy people just can't handle maths full stop.

    (For anyone insulted, the reverse is also true. Particularly in my case.)
    Maths is an Art. Lots of mathematicians are quite into arts, particularly music, though admittedly we are not always the best essayists.

    The problem here with maths is cultural, people should see mathematical inability on the lines of illiteracy.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    Maths is an Art. The problem here with maths is cultural, people should see mathematical inability on the lines of illiteracy.
    YES

    I was the typical student who hated maths for years and despite the fact I don't study it, when its practically applicable (or even theoretically interesting) it is such a great and useful subject.
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    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    Maths is an Art. Lots of mathematicians are quite into arts, particularly music, though admittedly we are not always the best essayists.

    The problem here with maths is cultural, people should see mathematical inability on the lines of illiteracy.
    I would say there is a difference, Mathsy people tend to be good at reading and playing music (Its essentially code reading and pattern spotting) but not so good when it comes to writing a song (or painting a picture or writing an essay). The latter are more creative than logical disciplines. They can overlap occasionally, but that is not to say they can be equated. In my opinion anyway.
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    (Original post by Itchynscratchy)
    I would say there is a difference, Mathsy people tend to be good at reading and playing music (Its essentially code reading and pattern spotting) but not so good when it comes to writing a song (or painting a picture or writing an essay). The latter are more creative than logical disciplines. They can overlap occasionally, but that is not to say they can be equated. In my opinion anyway.
    The music one is a bit of stereotype really, lots of the people I know doing maths are pretty useless. There are quite a lot of us that do arts or social sciences though, particularly Philosophy and Languages.

    Maths is very creative, I know you Physicists don't get into the proving aspect very much, but at that people Maths becomes really creative. Particularly in the pure mathematics.

    Of course Physics type people are probably rather different.
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    Mathematical dislike =/= mathematical inability.

    :dry:
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    I am not saying maths isn't creative, just that its a different type of creativity. In the same way that playing a song and writing one are different.
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    (Original post by Socrates)
    Mathematical dislike =/= mathematical inability.

    :dry:
    There is a correlation to an extent.
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    (Original post by Socrates)
    Mathematical dislike =/= mathematical inability.

    :dry:
    and likewise

    general trend =/= true for all cases

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