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Can I get into actuarial profession with a Music degree...

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    I'm currently on my gap year at the moment and I have thoughts of becoming an actuary when I finish my music degree at KCL. However I'm worried that most employers won't even look at me because I won't have a degree that's vaguely...mathsy. You may be thinking 'then why on earth are you doing a music degree' but my reason is just that I would like to study music at uni more than maths. However it doesn't mean that I don't enjoy maths. If it helps at all, I got an A* in GCSE maths and an A at A-level. Surely my music degree would be of some use because I would have gained experience in essay writing for writing reports etc. But will this be enough to prevent them from overlooking my CV do you think? Do you know of any people with an arts degree that have gone into the financial sector?

    Thank you.
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    I am at a Big4 and do not no of anybody with a music degree, your best bet is to apply and see where it takes you.
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    Your chances are pretty slim.
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    Not without further education. Do a Finance MSc then you'll stand more of a chance
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    My boyfriend and his friends all did music technology degrees. They now work in retail or admin. Ironically, the one who got a 1st is unemployed, though I suspect it's got more to do with hiim being far too choosy and snobby than him being unemployable.
    Music related degrees are good to learn more about your favourite hobby or passion, but unless you want a career in the music profession, they're not that useful.
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    (Original post by freeagent)
    I am at a Big4 and do not no of anybody with a music degree, your best bet is to apply and see where it takes you.
    Who are the Big4 exactly?
    What degree did you do, where from, what honours?
    Maths A level?
    What are your other A levels?
    Did you alot of work experience?

    (Original post by Smtn)
    Not without further education. Do a Finance MSc then you'll stand more of a chance
    Can you do that with a music degree?

    (Original post by 2late)
    Your chances are pretty slim.
    How come?

    (Original post by GilbertLam)
    I'm currently on my gap year at the moment and I have thoughts of becoming an actuary when I finish my music degree at KCL. However I'm worried that most employers won't even look at me because I won't have a degree that's vaguely...mathsy. You may be thinking 'then why on earth are you doing a music degree' but my reason is just that I would like to study music at uni more than maths. However it doesn't mean that I don't enjoy maths. If it helps at all, I got an A* in GCSE maths and an A at A-level. Surely my music degree would be of some use because I would have gained experience in essay writing for writing reports etc. But will this be enough to prevent them from overlooking my CV do you think? Do you know of any people with an arts degree that have gone into the financial sector?

    Thank you.
    What is your entire academic profile?
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    How competitive is getting on to an acturial graduate scheme?
    I am also interested in becoming one,
    3 Weeks Work Experience at an Acturial Firm (Aviva)
    Shadowing an Actuary One week.
    A* - Maths GCSE
    A*- Maths A level Predcition
    Aiming for first in Economics ( Warwick, Durham, Nottingham, Bristol, York) - Already have a York offer.
    Would I be suitable?

    (Original post by NW86)
    The BIg4 are PWC, KPMG, EY and Deloitte.
    I work at big4 in Advisory, not actuarial, which is a lot less interesting than advisory I can assure you.
    I did a degree in Art History from UEA, BA Hons
    No, hadn't studied maths since GCSE
    A levels - English lit, media, film studies
    I didnt do any work experience, i did acutal jobs, and had a frankly amazing cv to make up for my academic study choices
    I don't understasome of the abbreviations.
    PriceWaterHouseCompany.
    Deloitte.
    These are the only ones I recognise.
    What makes your CV amazing? When did you find time to actually make it amazing?
    How competitive is Actuarial graduate schemes at the 'Big Four'?

    (Original post by opeth82)
    My boyfriend and his friends all did music technology degrees. They now work in retail or admin. Ironically, the one who got a 1st is unemployed, though I suspect it's got more to do with hiim being far too choosy and snobby than him being unemployable.
    Music related degrees are good to learn more about your favourite hobby or passion, but unless you want a career in the music profession, they're not that useful.
    Almost useless in this case?

    (Original post by GilbertLam)
    I'm currently on my gap year at the moment and I have thoughts of becoming an actuary when I finish my music degree at KCL. However I'm worried that most employers won't even look at me because I won't have a degree that's vaguely...mathsy. You may be thinking 'then why on earth are you doing a music degree' but my reason is just that I would like to study music at uni more than maths. However it doesn't mean that I don't enjoy maths. If it helps at all, I got an A* in GCSE maths and an A at A-level. Surely my music degree would be of some use because I would have gained experience in essay writing for writing reports etc. But will this be enough to prevent them from overlooking my CV do you think? Do you know of any people with an arts degree that have gone into the financial sector?

    Thank you.
    Are you actually going to university or in the gap year after year 13? Would you consider changing the course? Can you?
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    (Original post by Mr.E)
    I don't understasome of the abbreviations.
    PriceWaterHouseCompany.
    Deloitte.
    These are the only ones I recognise.
    What makes your CV amazing? When did you find time to actually make it amazing?
    How competitive is Actuarial graduate schemes at the 'Big Four'?
    Coopers
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    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Coopers
    Thanks.

    (Original post by NW86)
    It's PriceWaterhouseCOOPER. EY = Ernst & Young, KPMG is just known as KPMG.

    I can't speak for all the big4, but you're looking at around 400-750 graduate places across the varying service lines., Advisory, Actuarial etc (depending on numbers recruited) and around 25,000 applicants.

    My CV is good due to extra curricular activites, president of 4th largest society at university, society treasurer are examples. I also worked during uni, and full time during the holidays in jobs that weren't just working in a shop. I ran the administration for an NHS building, albeit a small one, and held down a targets-based sales job at university with salesman of the month on a number of occasions
    The competition is extremely fierce then?
    You are right. That is an impressive CV. Well done.
    I don't want to be rude, but it more than made up for your poor subjects?
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    (Original post by Mr.E)
    The competition is extremely fierce then?
    You are right. That is an impressive CV. Well done.
    I don't want to be rude, but it more than made up for your poor subjects?
    I don't take it as rude at all, i'm well aware my a levels aren't the strongest of choices

    Your education does count for a lot, but a well rounded CV and the ability to interview well counts for a lot also. It is highly competitive though and don't take being knocked back to personally. When i was applying to grad schemes during my final year at university i remember one of the big4 didn't even accept my application form hehe!
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    (Original post by Mr.E)
    Almost useless in this case?
    I would have to say yes. Especially with the way things are at the moment with unemployment, redundancies etc, there will be far more people with the relevant qualifications and experience than there will be available jobs.
    If you like maths and are good at maths, I would suggest doing a maths degree, or maybe maths with finance, and do some extra-curricular music classes, or if the course gives you the option, a few music electives.
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    (Original post by NW86)
    I don't take it as rude at all, i'm well aware my a levels aren't the strongest of choices

    Your education does count for a lot, but a well rounded CV and the ability to interview well counts for a lot also. It is highly competitive though and don't take being knocked back to personally. When i was applying to grad schemes during my final year at university i remember one of the big4 didn't even accept my application form hehe!
    I am actually quite taken back at how competitive it is. It has got me worried in all fairness. I haven't got the best profile as it is, and barely hit the minimum entry requirements for the schemes. What would be your advice?
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    (Original post by opeth82)
    I would have to say yes. Especially with the way things are at the moment with unemployment, redundancies etc, there will be far more people with the relevant qualifications and experience than there will be available jobs.
    If you like maths and are good at maths, I would suggest doing a maths degree, or maybe maths with finance, and do some extra-curricular music classes, or if the course gives you the option, a few music electives.
    I agree, but I am interested in doing an economics degree, do you think this would be as suitable as maths or as useless as music? What relevant extra curriculars do you suggest I can take on?
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    (Original post by Mr.E)
    What is your entire academic profile?
    Right ok, after all the comments I now feel like I have zero chance! Thanks lol.

    My entire academic profile? I'm sure it won't change anything but:

    -8 A*'s and 7 A's at GCSE
    -4 A's at A-level in Maths, Music, Biology and Chemistry

    By the way my music course at KCL is an academic one. It's not a performing degree, in case that's what anyone is thinking. I won't sit there all day playing the piano.
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    There is a lady on Hewitt Associates grad website who got into Actuary with a Music degree...
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    Technically, yes. All you need to become an actuary is maths A level (at B grade or above, I believe). I did a lot of research into it and found that, whilst many firms ask for a quantitative degree, there are still plenty that don't. My advice is to go on the Actuary Profession website and look at the list of employers - there is a directory with employer profiles and it's quite useful (it's also arranged first alphabetically and then by location). Research to find which ones might take you.

    Try to get some work experience whilst at university (if possible - I don't know if it is) and perhaps do some extra maths-related study. I read somewhere that it's a good idea to try to take one of the actuary exams before you start applying to places so that they know you're a) serious and b) good enough, as the exams are hard to pass. However, the actuary textbooks seemed pretty expensive when I looked into this. Ebay might have some though!

    I did go to a PwC event once and asked a man there about my chances with the profession (I did English), and he was blunt and said I'd find it a struggle (although I think he was specifically talking about PwC). He suggested applying to enter the firm through another route (audit, assurance, etc) and then moving departments if I decided I still wanted it.

    Also, I spoke to a chemistry grad who had become and actuary and she was quite positive about my notion of becoming an actuary. I hope this helps a little bit!
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    (Original post by GilbertLam)
    Right ok, after all the comments I now feel like I have zero chance! Thanks lol.

    My entire academic profile? I'm sure it won't change anything but:

    -8 A*'s and 7 A's at GCSE
    -4 A's at A-level in Maths, Music, Biology and Chemistry

    By the way my music course at KCL is an academic one. It's not a performing degree, in case that's what anyone is thinking. I won't sit there all day playing the piano.
    This is a very good academic profile.
    From the comments above it appears that the best advice for you is to actually do some research surronding the graduate schemes.
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    (Original post by Inflation)
    There is a lady on Hewitt Associates grad website who got into Actuary with a Music degree...
    Hmm I couldn't find the profile. Could you copy and paste the address. Thanks!
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    (Original post by Inflation)
    There is a lady on Hewitt Associates grad website who got into Actuary with a Music degree...
    Seriously? I applied to Hewitt with a first class maths degree and I didn't even get to interview stage.
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    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Seriously? I applied to Hewitt with a first class maths degree and I didn't even get to interview stage.
    :eek:
    Really?

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