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A Week in the Life: LSE edition

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Applying to uni this year? Check out our new personal statement advice hub 28-11-2014
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    (Original post by member910132)
    Right, so if I genuinely enjoy maths and have got an A* in it and am expected to get an A* in FM but am not as good as those who have say applied to Cam/War and thus are good at STEP and so on will I still be able to cope with MA103 ?
    You should easily be able to cope with it if you put in a little bit of work in my opinion. I didn't really do much work in terms of revision, just paid a bit of attention in lectures and classes and managed to get a low 2.1. (As a vague reference I got A* in Maths and FM A level, and scraped passes in STEP II and III)

    It's quite heavily theory based...so there's quite a bit of definitions, theorems, proofs, etc to learn, but very manageable.
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    (Original post by member910132)
    Right, so if I genuinely enjoy maths and have got an A* in it and am expected to get an A* in FM but am not as good as those who have say applied to Cam/War and thus are good at STEP and so on will I still be able to cope with MA103 ?
    You'll be absolutely fine for MA103. Lots of my friends who did MA103 just did bogstandard Further Maths and that was it.

    And of course, remember to panic about EC102!
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    (Original post by Brantonli)
    You'll be absolutely fine for MA103. Lots of my friends who did MA103 just did bogstandard Further Maths and that was it.

    And of course, remember to panic about EC102!
    Why, how difficult is EC102?
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    (Original post by uttamo)
    Why, how difficult is EC102?
    it used to be ridiculously hard apparently, they've changed it now cos the guy who did it left, its nothing to worry about anymore
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    Hate the uni. Didn't even bother integrating/getting to know people as most of my friends go to local universities anyway and everyone here is awkward, fake or international.

    An average day for me would be to wake up at 8.00 AM and get to Hatton Cross station by 9.00 AM. Once the train arrives I will have to stand for 50 minutes until I reach to Holborn because rush hour (as you will find out if you live at home) ****s you in the arse.

    Go to whichever lecture I have without trying to fall asleep, since all the lecturers here are dull as **** and only interested in their personal research.

    Now its noon-ish. Time to go to the library and print off the reading.

    Seems easy, right?

    WRONG.

    As I walk into our beloved London School of Economics library I am confronted with a stampede of international students, rushing to get their grubby little hands on any computer that seems to be working.

    I attempt to go to the ground floor and in the process pull a hamstring because the designer of the stairs in our library was none other than ****ing Gok Wan himself.

    1 o clock now, and I'm at the ground floor. I dare any of you ****ers to try and get a computer during this time.

    I walk, walk and walk until I see some fatty fatty boom boom with his arse crack showing on a spare computer with his Macbook on the table and his EC101 textbook out.

    I say **** this and go home.

    Sums up LSE in a nutshell I guess.
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    (Original post by Nwakaeme)
    Hate the uni. Didn't even bother integrating/getting to know people as most of my friends go to local universities anyway and everyone here is awkward, fake or international.

    As I walk into our beloved London School of Economics library I am confronted with a stampede of international students, rushing to get their grubby little hands on any computer that seems to be working.
    This level of animosity towards international students is really concerning. This seems to border in racism, even. Is this type of home student vs international student hatred a typical situation in LSE? In UK universities in general?
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    (Original post by zettel)
    This level of animosity towards international students is really concerning. This seems to border in racism, even. Is this type of home student vs international student hatred a typical situation in LSE? In UK universities in general?
    No, everyone here is actually really friendly as long as you're friendly yourself. You rarely, rarely ever see people like the person you've quoted.

    Internationals tend to stick with internationals, that's usually the case; though there are some exceptions to this of course.
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    (Original post by zettel)
    This level of animosity towards international students is really concerning. This seems to border in racism, even. Is this type of home student vs international student hatred a typical situation in LSE? In UK universities in general?
    Its not animosity towards international students. Its more to the fact that typical British students see university as a place to have fun, meet people, go out etc as well as studying whereas Asian international students that have schooled in Asia tend to be a lot more studious and stick to their own.

    Its just a case of different cultures really
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    This is footage of an LSE social event organised by the Athletics Union (AU): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO2Nc16nGrs
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    (Original post by zettel)
    This level of animosity towards international students is really concerning. This seems to border in racism, even. Is this type of home student vs international student hatred a typical situation in LSE? In UK universities in general?
    I was born in China, and I gotta say, it seems like international students that don't adapt to British culture can be really annoying. Or at least, one finds it difficult to sympathise
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    (Original post by User3)
    Its not animosity towards international students. Its more to the fact that typical British students see university as a place to have fun, meet people, go out etc as well as studying whereas Asian international students that have schooled in Asia tend to be a lot more studious and stick to their own.

    Its just a case of different cultures really
    To be fair, I've come across plenty of domestic students at LSE who are like this. Nearly all of my friends who I actually enjoy going out with are not from LSE. It's impossible to find anyone at this uni who would be willing to go to somewhere like Fabric or Cable. Most people at LSE think they're above that. Socially, LSE doesn't feel like a university to me. It feels like a workplace, and if you don't quickly adapt to the LSE 'culture' then they think there's something wrong with you.
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    (Original post by haroldcraston)
    This is footage of an LSE social event organised by the Athletics Union (AU): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO2Nc16nGrs
    Interesting. Cheers for this pal!
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    Its not animosity towards international students. Its more to the fact that typical British students see university as a place to have fun, meet people, go out etc as well as studying whereas Asian international students that have schooled in Asia tend to be a lot more studious and stick to their own.

    Its just a case of different cultures really
    [QUOTE]To be fair, I've come across plenty of domestic students at LSE who are like this. Nearly all of my friends who I actually enjoy going out with are not from LSE. It's impossible to find anyone at this uni who would be willing to go to somewhere like Fabric or Cable. Most people at LSE think they're above that. Socially, LSE doesn't feel like a university to me. It feels like a workplace, and if you don't quickly adapt to the LSE 'culture' then they think there's something wrong with you.
    [/QUOTE

    I really haven't found there's much of a divide between British and international students, or that all LSE students are work focused and don't have a social life. Most of my friends who are on my course are both international and sociable, and most of the people I know are pretty sociable (I think I went to Fabric once with some LSE people but clubbing's not really my thing anyway). I think it varies depending on what course you're on and possibly what hall you live in.
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    and possibly what hall you live in.
    This is why I choose roseberry, apparently it's the most outgoing hall and it's closest to fabric

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