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gimme tips for physics

help
Assuming you're at pre-university level, I can give you some tips:

Learn about dimensional analysis. This is not usually taught in most high school physics but it is extremely useful because it allows you to verify whether a formula is correct when you derive a formula. It also can improve your intuitive understanding of physics formulas and make them easier to memorise. It's very simple and if you don't know what it is you can learn it in probably less than an hour. If you already know what it is, start using it more.

Make sure you have an intuitive understanding of everything. Ideally, when you think of a concept it should appear obvious to you. If it does not appear obvious, then try to find a way to make it obvious. Once you have an intuitive understanding of concept, it is much harder to forget.
For example, instead of just memorising the inverse square law for light intensity "the intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance" , instead think to yourself "but why is this true?" and come up with something like: "The light emanates in all directions of 3D space, which forms a spherical shape. Since the surface area of a sphere is proportional to the square of its radius, it is obvious that the intensity must decrease with the square of the distance". Once a concept is obvious to you, its easier to remember and apply to similar situations.

Use flashcards for things which need to be directly memorised, e.g. complex formulas, and laws which might need to be stated word-for-word in an exam.

Do lots of past papers. This is the most important step for doing well in exams. When you complete a past paper, mark every question and figure out all of your mistakes.

Using these strategies I get A* on every physics A-level paper and got accepted to Oxford for physics. Past papers are by far the most important thing.
Reply 2
Original post by sigmagrindset49
Assuming you're at pre-university level, I can give you some tips:

Learn about dimensional analysis. This is not usually taught in most high school physics but it is extremely useful because it allows you to verify whether a formula is correct when you derive a formula. It also can improve your intuitive understanding of physics formulas and make them easier to memorise. It's very simple and if you don't know what it is you can learn it in probably less than an hour. If you already know what it is, start using it more.

Make sure you have an intuitive understanding of everything. Ideally, when you think of a concept it should appear obvious to you. If it does not appear obvious, then try to find a way to make it obvious. Once you have an intuitive understanding of concept, it is much harder to forget.
For example, instead of just memorising the inverse square law for light intensity "the intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance" , instead think to yourself "but why is this true?" and come up with something like: "The light emanates in all directions of 3D space, which forms a spherical shape. Since the surface area of a sphere is proportional to the square of its radius, it is obvious that the intensity must decrease with the square of the distance". Once a concept is obvious to you, its easier to remember and apply to similar situations.

Use flashcards for things which need to be directly memorised, e.g. complex formulas, and laws which might need to be stated word-for-word in an exam.

Do lots of past papers. This is the most important step for doing well in exams. When you complete a past paper, mark every question and figure out all of your mistakes.

Using these strategies I get A* on every physics A-level paper and got accepted to Oxford for physics. Past papers are by far the most important thing.

Did you find any youtube videos helpful for A-level Physics? I've got yr12 mocks coming up and I seem to lose most my marks in papers around waves and electricity
Reply 3
Original post by Vlone3213413312
help


practice questions from past papers above everything else. physics and maths tutor, umutech, study mind and revisely are all great sites.
Original post by bears15
Did you find any youtube videos helpful for A-level Physics? I've got yr12 mocks coming up and I seem to lose most my marks in papers around waves and electricity


unfortunately I have no recommendations as I dont watch many videos for revision

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