What is the point of a private education? Watch

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Is there any actual benefit of spending large amounts of money to send your child to a private school?

Ignoring the snobbery and such that surrounds private education, what do private school students have to show for the large investment in their education?

When it comes to applying and getting into University, a student who went to state schools and did well, and hasn't spent any money directly on their education will be in the same position as another candidate who comes from private education, that over the years has cost thousands of pounds. What's the point?

Also, they tend (without being offensive or stereotyping) to have lived in a bubble for the majority of their lives, unaware of "real life", and lack experience that an employer would look for should they want to find work while at uni, etc.

Of course I understand the benefit of private education in some circumstances, but it really isn't necessary in most cases.
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Dylankj96
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(Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
Is there any actual benefit of spending large amounts of money to send your child to a private school?

Ignoring the snobbery and such that surrounds private education, what do private school students have to show for the large investment in their education?

When it comes to applying and getting into University, a student who went to state schools and did well, and hasn't spent any money directly on their education will be in the same position as another candidate who comes from private education, that over the years has cost thousands of pounds. What's the point?

Also, they tend (without being offensive or stereotyping) to have lived in a bubble for the majority of their lives, unaware of "real life", and lack experience that an employer would look for should they want to find work while at uni, etc.

Of course I understand the benefit of private education in some circumstances, but it really isn't necessary in most cases.
In short, yes.
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Stickman
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Private schools arguably get you into top unis because of the spoon feeding treatment for many years, but after that, even at uni when the real world hits you, you're screwed. Has to be said, there are those students from private schools that are born genius and don't have to do much and don't struggle past uni either. But that can be said about state schools too.
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Yaboywithabona
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The point is

we can give our children a better chance than the competition

Fact
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idontknowbye
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(Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
Is there any actual benefit of spending large amounts of money to send your child to a private school?

Ignoring the snobbery and such that surrounds private education, what do private school students have to show for the large investment in their education?

When it comes to applying and getting into University, a student who went to state schools and did well, and hasn't spent any money directly on their education will be in the same position as another candidate who comes from private education, that over the years has cost thousands of pounds. What's the point?

Also, they tend (without being offensive or stereotyping) to have lived in a bubble for the majority of their lives, unaware of "real life", and lack experience that an employer would look for should they want to find work while at uni, etc.

Of course I understand the benefit of private education in some circumstances, but it really isn't necessary in most cases.
why do we tend to have lived in a bubble for the majority of our lives? You make no sense
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Vousden
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Yes some people at Oxbridge have spent £100,000+ getting there and some paid nothing - yes you're right. However, for some of those people, without their private education they might have not got into Oxbridge.

Basically what I'm saying is that by putting your child through a private education your increasing the chances they will get into a top uni.

That's obviously not the best situation to be in, but that's a separate argument.
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Old_Simon
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The basic premise of the OP that private school applicants to university are "in the same position" as state school pupils is fundamentally flawed.
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Ripper-Roo
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Chance for certain parents to show off that they can afford it.

It's got nothing to do with wanting the best for your child, you can get the best for your child by providing a stable home life and sending them to a state school and their own determination to do well.
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Ripper-Roo
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(Original post by Vousden)
However, for some of those people, without their private education they might have not got into Oxbridge.
It's a bit artificial then and not reflective of the true child
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Vousden
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(Original post by Ripper-Roo)
Chance for certain parents to show off that they can afford it.

It's got nothing to do with wanting the best for your child, you can get the best for your child by providing a stable home life and sending them to a state school and their own determination to do well.
I have to disagree with this. Who would these parents be showing off to?
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Ripper-Roo
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(Original post by Vousden)
I have to disagree with this. Who would these parents be showing off to?
The pride when they say "my child goes to X school". It's reflective of their economic status and occupation, people will assume they're wealthy at least. Unless it's obvious they're one of those parents that wastes any penny they do have on private education when they have an average paid job.
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Boy_wonder_95
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
The basic premise of the OP that private school applicants to university are "in the same position" as state school pupils is fundamentally flawed.
Given that they have similar grades?
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The_Last_Melon
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People in private schools imo tend to have developed more unique personalities, however they may struggle after school because they have not learned to do things for themselves.
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Ripper-Roo
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(Original post by arson_fire)
Even if the state school is one of the worst in the country and has major discipline problems? With no access to sports or other extra-curricular activities or any trips anywhere. Where you cant take higher physics because no one else in your year is doing it.

I`ll be selling my ass on the street corners to keep my kids away from state schools like the one I went to.
The state should do more to improve the level of education in the bottom of the state sector. Parents shouldn't have to feel as though they're only choice for the children is private education.

Also I don't see the big fuss about sport facilities etc, it wouldn't sway my decision.
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Old_Simon
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(Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
Given that they have similar grades?
Well if and when they have the same grades which is perfectly common of course that it becomes clear that they are far from being in the "same position". They aren't. Check out the Sutton Trust reports.
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William Turtle
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(Original post by Ripper-Roo)
The state should do more to improve the level of education in the bottom of the state sector. Parents shouldn't have to feel as though they're only choice for the children is private education.

Also I don't see the big fuss about sport facilities etc, it wouldn't sway my decision.
Your argument against private schooling seems to be based on the above, that state schools should be better. Yes, in an ideal world, all state schools should be able to match private. The fact is that they can't.

Private schools can often give a child a better academic start, more opportunity to develop all kinds of skills and greater confidence. Simply because you are ideologically opposed to private education does not mean that you'll end up a snob having been privately educated, and is certainly no basis to believe that state schools are better.
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idontknowbye
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(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
People in private schools imo tend to have developed more unique personalities, however they may struggle after school because they have not learned to do things for themselves.
what are you talking about and more importantly where have you come up with such nonsense
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64gaso146wd
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(Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
Is there any actual benefit of spending large amounts of money to send your child to a private school?

Ignoring the snobbery and such that surrounds private education, what do private school students have to show for the large investment in their education?

When it comes to applying and getting into University, a student who went to state schools and did well, and hasn't spent any money directly on their education will be in the same position as another candidate who comes from private education, that over the years has cost thousands of pounds. What's the point?

Also, they tend (without being offensive or stereotyping) to have lived in a bubble for the majority of their lives, unaware of "real life", and lack experience that an employer would look for should they want to find work while at uni, etc.

Of course I understand the benefit of private education in some circumstances, but it really isn't necessary in most cases.
For the majority of people I know (I'm in private education) they have the money to be able to afford it and in most cases in comparison to state schools the overall grades of a private school tend to be much higher. Though there are people who do exceptionally well in state schools (I know 2 people with offers to study at oxford who are at state schools) the vast majority don't do as well and it's reflected in the results statistics of the school.

For me personally we lived abroad for several years. My parents saved a lot in order for my brother and I to be able to go to private school because the local state school we would have come back to wasn't great, and putting us in private education gave us a better chance of doing well, getting good grades, more opportunities and often better uni prospects.

Private schools will have a lot more funding, courtesy of the fees, to be able to give students better opportunities for sports and school trips. The school I'm at has its own boat club if thats anything to go by.

I definitely agree with you about the bubble though. Some people fare better than most if they do things outside of school and others really can't deal with the reality of things once they've left school.

People go to private schools for different reasons, whether or not you agree with those reasons is a different matter
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Mackay
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There are certain advantages which are listed above but I personally wouldn't want my child brought up in a private school environment. Top uni or not, a lot of it comes down to the actual intellect of the child.
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The_Last_Melon
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(Original post by idontknowbye)
what are you talking about and more importantly where have you come up with such nonsense
In that space between my ears.
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