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The physics behind knocking in a cricket bat watch

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    So this is my physics coursework and i need to know what actually happens during the knocking in procedure?
    I also dont know any tests i can do to test any improvement. I.e using Youngs Modulus/Stress/Strain during contact with the ball etc.
    Im also not really sure on the correct word for compressing willow, is the material tough/hard/stiff?

    My explanation is that the particles compress together which makes the material stronger (need correct word if poss) and improves the co-efficient of restitution, and makes it less likely to break. Any ideas?
    Thanks
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    Look up work hardening - although I'm not sure if this is relevant to willow
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    im guessing its not that relevant to physics. but you might be able to blag it.

    just search google. all cs/wk operates that way
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    Good question....
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    (Original post by teachercol)
    Look up work hardening - although I'm not sure if this is relevant to willow
    I think work hardening mainly applies to metals, but If you were to treat/varnish a cricket bat, then I suppose it could have a similar effect.

    To the OP: Sorry I can't really help you out on this one! :o:
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    This article is interesting (but doesn't help that much!):

    http://www.abcofcricket.com/Article_...rt48/art48.htm
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    I searched on Google Scholar and found this paper. Its abstract is sort of useful:
    New cricket bats need to be ‘knocked in’ prior to use, but just what this process does to the surface fibres of the bat is unknown and unquantified. One quantitative measurement of knock-in is the resultant surface hardness of the bat, and this paper describes knock-in tests to determine the surface hardness following differing durations of knock-in. The design of a cricket bat knock-in machine is first described. This takes the form of a cradle in which a cricket bat can be secured horizontally and then traversed at constant speeds in two mutually perpendicular directions while at the same time being struck with constant force by a cricket ball. The traverses are driven by lead screws, the motors of which can be independently switched on or off. The traverse distance can be varied with adjustable limit switches and relays that reverse the direction of rotation of the lead screws when activated. The cricket ball is attached to a rod that is lifted cyclically by a cam against a coil spring extension, and then allowed to fall under that force to impact on the bat surface. The impact (knocking-in) force was measured by a previously calibrated strain gauge attached to the rod holding the cricket ball. By judicious setting of the limit switches, selected areas of the bat surface were continuously knocked in for periods varying from 1 to 4 hours. After knocking in, the surface hardness was measured in accordance with British Standard 373 using a penetrator designed in accordance with the same standard. Analysis of the load/penetration curves shows an increase in surface hardness with knock duration. Photographs of the cell structure of the surface wood, obtained using a scanning electron microscope, show that under knock-in conditions, the wood cells collapse to form a mesh-like hardened layer which increases in hardness with increase in knock-in duration.
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    (Original post by Supermerp)
    I searched on Google Scholar and found this paper. Its abstract is sort of useful:
    Thanks man that was really helpful! My teacher was like oh you like cricket do it on willow, without even telling me there is hardly anything on it. Repped for the find.
 
 
 
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