Esimm03
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Hi,
so I'm currently in Sixth form, studying English lit, geography and history. when I joined I really didn't know what I wanted to do, so chose the a levels for the GCSEs I did the best in. after some thought I've decided that I want to train up to be an airline pilot, but I'm not sure how I'd go about this (I know I need an atpl ect..), I intend to progress to university for a Geography degree with maybe physical geography. but I'm a bit stumped as to what to do next?

are there any universities that have the ATPL built into the corse? and thus covered under student loans? I'm also available to study in the US, as I'm a duel US/UK citizen, I was recommended a university in Florida/Arizona that might have this option, but for the life of me I can't remember the name 😂

any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Ethan
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Lillalumpkin
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Hi Ethan,

I don't know much about universities at all, but I am going to become a helicopter pilot!

Have you considered learning to fly in the military? Because that is definitely paid for. I will learn to fly with the Royal Navy who will pay for all of my training which will earn me a degree in aeronautics so I won't need to go to university. This may not be a good option for you but just keep it in mind - you can always train with the forces and leave to become an airline pilot a few years later with all of your qualifications!

I hope this helps, sorry I couldn't give any advice about university, good luck!
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rks3
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If you go on the UCAS website and search pilot, and click on undergraduate and you should be able to find some more guidance on there.

Some universities have an integrated course that allow you to get a frozen ATPL or an ATPL in itself. In terms of finance, the £40k or so for the uni degree is covered by the student loan, but the training and license had to be privately or self funded
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CurlyBen
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(Original post by Esimm03)
Hi,
so I'm currently in Sixth form, studying English lit, geography and history. when I joined I really didn't know what I wanted to do, so chose the a levels for the GCSEs I did the best in. after some thought I've decided that I want to train up to be an airline pilot, but I'm not sure how I'd go about this (I know I need an atpl ect..), I intend to progress to university for a Geography degree with maybe physical geography. but I'm a bit stumped as to what to do next?

are there any universities that have the ATPL built into the corse? and thus covered under student loans? I'm also available to study in the US, as I'm a duel US/UK citizen, I was recommended a university in Florida/Arizona that might have this option, but for the life of me I can't remember the name 😂

any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Ethan
In Europe, you need a frozen ATPL (ATPL exams + CPL + IR), not a full ATPL - that's what the captain needs to hold. In the US you do need an ATP for the major (part 121) airlines. You probably want to investigate Oxford Aviation Academy and FTE Jerez for training in Europe. You could also investigate the multi crew pilot licence (MPL) option, I know very little about it. UK student loans won't cover flight training, at least some US loans do but the university routes tend to be VERY expensive. The Florida/Arizona university is almost certainly Embry Riddle (ERAU). If you want to get a degree I wouldn't choose one of the 'pilot' courses. I haven't looked into all of them, but from what I've seen you're essentially getting the ground portion of a PPL or CPL and then a bunch of related but non-essential subjects. You can do a distance learning course to get essentially the same qualifications with a distance learning course for about £2,500 and a few months of study. I'm a helicopter pilot rather than an aeroplane driver but I'll try and answer questions if you have them.
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azhal
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(Original post by Esimm03)
Hi,
so I'm currently in Sixth form, studying English lit, geography and history. when I joined I really didn't know what I wanted to do, so chose the a levels for the GCSEs I did the best in. after some thought I've decided that I want to train up to be an airline pilot, but I'm not sure how I'd go about this (I know I need an atpl ect..), I intend to progress to university for a Geography degree with maybe physical geography. but I'm a bit stumped as to what to do next?

are there any universities that have the ATPL built into the corse? and thus covered under student loans? I'm also available to study in the US, as I'm a duel US/UK citizen, I was recommended a university in Florida/Arizona that might have this option, but for the life of me I can't remember the name 😂

any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Ethan
Hi great to meet you. Im going to give you the answet that most proffessional pilots give you. Dont go to oxford dont got to FTA why fork out 140k in a loan (with intrest) on some licences which are no diffrent from someone who paid 45k is the lowest ive saw it FOR THE SAME LICENCES now to be a pilot in the us you require a degree of any sort 4 years long i think ypu have to do it at an american university i dont recommed going over there 1: longer time to get a fully established caeer
2 converting licence is just annoying, now you can by all means go put your house on a collateral loan, or you cab worj, or get a degree (degrees are really needed unless you want to stand out) get your atpl theory done try get min 90% pass rate and you'll be good. Hope this is helpful. One last thing Dont pay a preimium for something you can get way less from places just as good.
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Johnny Tightlips
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CurlyBen
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(Original post by azhal)
Hi great to meet you. Im going to give you the answet that most proffessional pilots give you. Dont go to oxford dont got to FTA why fork out 140k in a loan (with intrest) on some licences which are no diffrent from someone who paid 45k is the lowest ive saw it FOR THE SAME LICENCES now to be a pilot in the us you require a degree of any sort 4 years long i think ypu have to do it at an american university i dont recommed going over there 1: longer time to get a fully established caeer
2 converting licence is just annoying, now you can by all means go put your house on a collateral loan, or you cab worj, or get a degree (degrees are really needed unless you want to stand out) get your atpl theory done try get min 90% pass rate and you'll be good. Hope this is helpful. One last thing Dont pay a preimium for something you can get way less from places just as good.
Just in case someone comes across this post later, the information on the US is wrong. You definitely do not need a degree to be a pilot there. Converting the licence isn't easy but doesn't require work you wouldn't have to do if you got your licences in the UK in the first place (and some flight schools in the US have, and probably still do, offered EASA licences, so no conversion would be necessary).
As for Oxford/FTA, not my area of expertise (I fly rotary wing) but a clear route into an airline has value, and that's what they provide. I'm highly sceptical that you could get an EASA commercial licence for £45k, and if you could, I'd be worried about the corners they're cutting!
Just for a bit of credibility, I got my EASA and FAA licences in the US and worked there as a helicopter pilot.
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azhal
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(Original post by CurlyBen)
Just in case someone comes across this post later, the information on the US is wrong. You definitely do not need a degree to be a pilot there. Converting the licence isn't easy but doesn't require work you wouldn't have to do if you got your licences in the UK in the first place (and some flight schools in the US have, and probably still do, offered EASA licences, so no conversion would be necessary).
As for Oxford/FTA, not my area of expertise (I fly rotary wing) but a clear route into an airline has value, and that's what they provide. I'm highly sceptical that you could get an EASA commercial licence for £45k, and if you could, I'd be worried about the corners they're cutting!
Just for a bit of credibility, I got my EASA and FAA licences in the US and worked there as a helicopter pilot.
Don't spurt out nonsense of course you can get a frozen atpl for circa 45k if you worked your noggin', many have spent that many have spent a little more depends what you prefer quick or cheaper. Like you said its not your area of expertise....my point made

Halil
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CurlyBen
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(Original post by azhal)
Don't spurt out nonsense of course you can get a frozen atpl for circa 45k if you worked your noggin', many have spent that many have spent a little more depends what you prefer quick or cheaper. Like you said its not your area of expertise....my point made

Halil
Ah, that strongest of arguments, "shut up you're wrong". I'm sure many people have got a frozen ATPL for less than £45k... but you used to be able to buy a house for £45k, you can't anymore!
Cranfield quote just over £58k for the modular route. FTA quote £47.5k for the post-PPL modules. Both are based on minimum hours and no test failures, which is not something you want to bank on.
I'm sure you'll tell me I'm wrong again, but I'll ignore you if you don't post something to back up what you're saying.
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Edminzodo
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I know that at some universities you could do Aerospace Engineering and Pilot Studies with a Foundation Year, which is an option with your subjects.
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JJJJJAAAAMES
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Financing piloting is very expensive, Student loans for university courses that do piloting will only cover the 9000£ tuition fees, you would have to pay the £80,000 yourself.

Also if you join any of the armed forces you will be required to stay there for a very long time. I know that the RAF requires you to be a pilot for a minimum of 12 years, before you can leave, as it says on their website
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AscendingWings
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It depends what type of pilot you want to be.

My advise, get flying experience, make sure it is what you want to do.

Look for funded opportunities like scholarships. Some airliners support students. I had a friend who dropped out of medicine to become an airline pilot, she’s doing fantastic.

As mentioned, a military career is long but if flying is what you want to do then the RAF, Navy and Army all fly.

Also, some universities, again as already mentioned, are integrating pilots licences into the course. You won’t be getting free flying with them but the content and exams, from what I’ve heard, will be some of the foundations to the course structure.

Lots of research to be done but only you can make the best decision for yourself. Best of luck with it
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ukscr
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Hi all,I currently work for a flight school in the South West of England, currently training myself.


I'll clear some things up:

You do NOT need a degree. In fact, you don't even NEED A-Levels in Physics and Maths - although they may help for your ATPLs.

Training IS expensive, budget £80,000 for modular training and in the region of £110-120,000 for integrated training.

DO apply for aviation scholarships, BUT don't be disheartened that you may not be accepted. They are painfully competitive, but you may very well be the perfect candidate!

Armed Forces - a few things. HIGHLY competitive. Additionally, you need to be willing to be in it for the long run. 12 year MINIMUM serving period, so EXPECT the worst case that you're deployed. Even if you get through the 12 years and leave with your licenses, they still need to be converted. Conversion can be difficult and you end up paying out of your own pocket (although aided by ELCAS) - usually the guys who joined the RAF simply to get a license and ditch struggle with civvie training - so BEWARE.

ATPL examinations - very hard. 14 exams, each one like an A-Level. You need to be prepared to be a hermit for 8-10 months if you're doing them fast-track. Perhaps you'd rather do them at a slower pace so you can continue to work - so distance learning over 18 months may be better.

DON'T go abroad and train under a foreign aviation authority unless you plan on flying there. The conversion back to EASA/UKCAA standards is a bloody ball ache, and you'll end up forking out more £££ even though abroad was initially "cheaper". Standards really do differ across borders.

And get a job before starting your training. It's something to fall back on should the aviation sector crumble again.

If you've any questions, please fire them my way!
Last edited by ukscr; 4 weeks ago
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Drewski
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(Original post by Lillalumpkin)
Have you considered learning to fly in the military? Because that is definitely paid for. I will learn to fly with the Royal Navy who will pay for all of my training which will earn me a degree in aeronautics so I won't need to go to university. This may not be a good option for you but just keep it in mind - you can always train with the forces and leave to become an airline pilot a few years later with all of your qualifications!
(Original post by JJJJJAAAAMES)
Also if you join any of the armed forces you will be required to stay there for a very long time. I know that the RAF requires you to be a pilot for a minimum of 12 years, before you can leave, as it says on their website
Becoming a pilot in the military is not an easy pathway if you're looking to be an airline pilot. Yes, you'll be trained, but you won't be getting civil licenses - you'll need to do this (at your own expense) in order to be eligible to fly airliners later on. Plus there are the many highly restrictive limits on who they let in.
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Hellohsjakodsmka
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CurlyBen
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(Original post by ukscr)
DON'T go abroad and train under a foreign aviation authority unless you plan on flying there. The conversion back to EASA/UKCAA standards is a bloody ball ache, and you'll end up forking out more £££ even though abroad was initially "cheaper". Standards really do differ across borders.
I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss the idea of training overseas. You can do EASA qualifications in, for example, the US, and - at least in the rotary world - it's easier to get the all-important first job abroad. Talking to friends who've done it, the ballache of the EASA conversion is the ground school rather than the flight side of things.
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