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graduate entry medicine

So right now I am doing a pharmacology degree at the uni of Leeds and have realised I want to do medicine hence was considering doing graduate entry medicine, however the fact that it is a 4 year course is daunting because I would essentially be spending 7 years back to back I'm university as opposed to the 5/6 yrs ppl who choose the A100 course do...is there anyway to shorten this especially because I would ideally like to finish my first degree and go straight to medicine hence do I have to do the mandatory 2 years of biological sciences?
Reply 1
Original post by 0n4
So right now I am doing a pharmacology degree at the uni of Leeds and have realised I want to do medicine hence was considering doing graduate entry medicine, however the fact that it is a 4 year course is daunting because I would essentially be spending 7 years back to back I'm university as opposed to the 5/6 yrs ppl who choose the A100 course do...is there anyway to shorten this especially because I would ideally like to finish my first degree and go straight to medicine hence do I have to do the mandatory 2 years of biological sciences?
Or are there different paths I could take like a masters to still get into that industry...I know about being a cardiac perfusionist but what more is there? And are there unis outside of the UK that offer GEM
Reply 2
Original post by 0n4
So right now I am doing a pharmacology degree at the uni of Leeds and have realised I want to do medicine hence was considering doing graduate entry medicine, however the fact that it is a 4 year course is daunting because I would essentially be spending 7 years back to back I'm university as opposed to the 5/6 yrs ppl who choose the A100 course do...is there anyway to shorten this especially because I would ideally like to finish my first degree and go straight to medicine hence do I have to do the mandatory 2 years of biological sciences?
There is no shortcut to being a Dr - other than the year GEM already knocks off the standard course. A lot of the 4 years will not be spent at uni, but on placement, in hospitals
There is no way round this and I am not aware of anywhere abroad that qualifies you in medicine more quickly
Reply 3
Original post by GANFYD
There is no shortcut to being a Dr - other than the year GEM already knocks off the standard course. A lot of the 4 years will not be spent at uni, but on placement, in hospitals
There is no way round this and I am not aware of anywhere abroad that qualifies you in medicine more quickly
thank you then! I was just concerned that I would finish my degree and have to spend the next 2 years relearning the same content for GEM.
Reply 4
I did pharmacology and now at the end of a GEM. Not sure about what ur curriculum teaches but from my perspective pharmacology biological sciences is not really the same as medicine biological sciences. Sometimes the course overlaps and you re-learn RAAS, cardiac cycle or how a lung works for the 15th time. But most of the time they try to link it to a condition that you will be taught how to manage in the future or pathophysiology you can build on.

Because they take out a year, they will try to cram 2 years into one so you will only be doing 1 year of biological sciences anyway. In that year, you won't just be learning every single system in the body, you will also learn laws and ethics of medicine, how to take a history, do an examination and anatomy (not sure if u took an anatomy subcourse but a lot of brain power to remember every muscle, nerve, bone and organ in the body). You kinda need this base knowledge for the clinical years. Most universities chuck u into some form bed side teaching from year one and ramp up hospital time from year 2 onwards. So you really aint just gonna be sitting around all year going 'I know this why am i here'. It's quite intense and tbh if you do know some stuff, it makes ur life easier and gives u more time to deal with the **** topics that you might've not learnt before. Like brain anatomy, decussation patterns of nerves, crainial nerves and brain nucleuses (bane of my life)

Also i wouldn't worry about being on 7 years than 5/6, it might seem like a problem now but there's not really much point competing to see who finish medicine first. You all end up being doctors. They wouldn't have even finished their training years by the time you finish the medical course.
(edited 1 month ago)

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