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    Hi everyone, I'm currently a Psychology student going into second year at uni. But, like a lot of people who will be reading this, I have realised that my real passion is medicine. I am looking at the difference between the 4 year GEM (A101) route and applying to the normal 5 year courses (A100). So here are my questions:
    1. In terms of financing, what is the difference in cost between the 4 and 5 year courses and what funding options are available for each, in terms of loans and NHS bursaries etc.?
    2. Would I be able to apply in my final year of uni or would I have to wait until I've graduated? And if I can apply in 4th year, is there less of a chance of me being accepted than until waiting until I graduate?
    3. (Aimed more at Current Med Students or Med Graduates) Do you think the benefits of med school (ie. Career prospects, Salary) greatly outweigh the costs (ie. Finance, Large workload)?
    Also, anyone have a link to a website where you can take a practice UKCAT test?
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    1. I know that student finance generally pays for 4 years of undergraduate degree, but I'm not sure how doing a second degree works. The NHS Bursary will cover 2 years. I think you should really talk to student finance directly for information because this kind of thing is really tricky to get right without talking to someone who knows what they're on about. I mean, for a normal 6 year course, it'll go first 4 years student finance, last 2 years NHS bursary.

    EDIT: having spoken to my friend, graduate medicine - you pay year 1 yourself, and the last 3 years is student finance.

    2. You can definitely apply in your final year. I think you'll need to have references and first and second year transcripts, for predicted grades etc, but I know friends who are currently applying for graduate medicine this coming october and they will be in their final year of undergrad. I would, however, once again *check* with the individual universities - you'll be given conditional offers, as you would have done at A-level, and the likely conditional offer is actually a 2.i at most universities.

    3. Yes. Without a shadow of a doubt. You'll have a lifelong, satisfying and important career.

    4. http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/preparation/p.../#.Ug38m38hNyE

    Hope this helps.

    (Original post by AndrewY94)
    Hi everyone, I'm currently a Psychology student going into second year at uni. But, like a lot of people who will be reading this, I have realised that my real passion is medicine. I am looking at the difference between the 4 year GEM (A101) route and applying to the normal 5 year courses (A100). So here are my questions:
    1. In terms of financing, what is the difference in cost between the 4 and 5 year courses and what funding options are available for each, in terms of loans and NHS bursaries etc.?
    2. Would I be able to apply in my final year of uni or would I have to wait until I've graduated? And if I can apply in 4th year, is there less of a chance of me being accepted than until waiting until I graduate?
    3. (Aimed more at Current Med Students or Med Graduates) Do you think the benefits of med school (ie. Career prospects, Salary) greatly outweigh the costs (ie. Finance, Large workload)?
    Also, anyone have a link to a website where you can take a practice UKCAT test?
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    If you do GEM entry A101 - you have to pay the first year and then student finance pay the rest of your years.

    If you go into A100 you have to pay the first four years TUITON yourself, you will still get a maintainence loan. In the 5th year you are supported by the NHS, Student Loans etc.
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    (Original post by AndrewY94)
    Hi everyone, I'm currently a Psychology student going into second year at uni. But, like a lot of people who will be reading this, I have realised that my real passion is medicine. I am looking at the difference between the 4 year GEM (A101) route and applying to the normal 5 year courses (A100). So here are my questions:
    1. In terms of financing, what is the difference in cost between the 4 and 5 year courses and what funding options are available for each, in terms of loans and NHS bursaries etc.?
    2. Would I be able to apply in my final year of uni or would I have to wait until I've graduated? And if I can apply in 4th year, is there less of a chance of me being accepted than until waiting until I graduate?
    3. (Aimed more at Current Med Students or Med Graduates) Do you think the benefits of med school (ie. Career prospects, Salary) greatly outweigh the costs (ie. Finance, Large workload)?
    Also, anyone have a link to a website where you can take a practice UKCAT test?
    Hi,

    I went through this recently and am now starting in a month having done an economics degree first (5 years ago).

    1. The difference is significant. For graduate medicine, you have to pay 3.5k (upfront) in the first year and then the rest is covered by a loan. Years 2-4 £3.5k of your fees is paid and the rest is a student finance loan. For living costs you can get a maintenance loan in year 1 and years 2-4 are a combo of bursary and loan.

    A good guide is here:

    http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/students...mstudents.aspx

    For A100, you do not get a tuition fee loan for years 1-4, you have to pay upfront (so you’ll need £36k in total for fees). In year 5, the NHS pays your fees and gives you a bursary. You can get a maintenance loan for living costs but this would probably need some topping up.

    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...s-in-medicine/

    2. Yes, for everywhere except Leicester I think (but you have to have worked in the NHS for them, which you are unlikely to have done if you don’t already have your degree).

    3. It’s a trade off – only you can decide and it will depend on what other options you have. If you are primarily motivated by money then you might find you can get more doing less with something else but you will not be poor as a doctor. I presume you have done some work experience to have come to this decision? That’s probably the best info you have on whether it’s worth it for you.

    If you’re going into your 2nd year then you can relax about UKCAT for a bit. However, when you are applying, take the UKCAT and/or GAMSAT extremely seriously (FYI – GAMSAT and SGUL or Nottingham are your best bet for a graduate place). People will tell you that you can’t “revise” for UKCAT and that it measures “natural ability” blahblahblah. Whilst you don’t “revise” for it, you can prepare for it. Very few of the questions are “hard” as such (except perhaps some of the AR), anyone can do them with enough time. The time constraint is the essence of the test and a lot of practice will make an overwhelming difference to your performance. GAMSAT is a different beast altogether.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    1. I know that student finance generally pays for 4 years of undergraduate degree, but I'm not sure how doing a second degree works. The NHS Bursary will cover 2 years. I think you should really talk to student finance directly for information because this kind of thing is really tricky to get right without talking to someone who knows what they're on about. I mean, for a normal 6 year course, it'll go first 4 years student finance, last 2 years NHS bursary.

    EDIT: having spoken to my friend, graduate medicine - you pay year 1 yourself, and the last 3 years is student finance.
    Student Finance pays whatever the length of your chosen course is + one year. You still get Student Finance support in the last two years of a six year medical degree, the NHS Bursary just replaces some of it (sorry, I'm thoroughly sick of people spreading this 'four year myth' just because most Bachelors are three years so in those cases it's three + one = four).

    With GEM currently you only pay £3.5k of year 1 yourself upfront.



    2. You can definitely apply in your final year. I think you'll need to have references and first and second year transcripts, for predicted grades etc, but I know friends who are currently applying for graduate medicine this coming october and they will be in their final year of undergrad. I would, however, once again *check* with the individual universities - you'll be given conditional offers, as you would have done at A-level, and the likely conditional offer is actually a 2.i at most universities.
    Not every GEM course will let you apply before having got your degree, last time I looked.
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    I wasn't aware it was a 'myth' because all the clinical students I've spoken to have said this to me so far. But this is good news means I may have more money than I thought I would've had. So yay.
    (Original post by Ronove)
    Student Finance pays whatever the length of your chosen course is + one year. You still get Student Finance support in the last two years of a six year medical degree, the NHS Bursary just replaces some of it (sorry, I'm thoroughly sick of people spreading this 'four year myth' just because most Bachelors are three years so in those cases it's three + one = four).

    With GEM currently you only pay £3.5k of year 1 yourself upfront.




    Not every GEM course will let you apply before having got your degree, last time I looked.
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    I wasn't aware it was a 'myth' because all the clinical students I've spoken to have said this to me so far. But this is good news means I may have more money than I thought I would've had. So yay.
    Thanks for all the advice guys. I just got an e-mail from Dundee admissions telling me I couldn't get on the A100 course because my degree isn't in a life science. And if I did science modules this year I wouldn't be eligible for the A104 Pre-med course either because apparently it is designed for people with no science background. Seems a bit odd. And I have a question: Has anyone else done psychology and wanted to apply for medicine at a Scottish uni? If you have, what did the med schools you applied to say about entering with a psychology degree. I didn't take any sciences to higher, which I regret, so I don't seem to be able to apply to any one of the Scottish med schools
 
 
 
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