Electronegativity quick question? Watch

ellie.b_97
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In sulphur hexaflouride (SF6) is sulphur more electonegative than fluorine or the other way around?
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kayal97
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(Original post by ellie.b_97)
In sulphur hexaflouride (SF6) is sulphur more electonegative than fluorine or the other way around?
Fluorine is.
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anosmianAcrimony
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Fluorine is more electronegative than anything else under any circumstances. I think you mean to ask which was more negatively charged or electron-dense.
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ellie.b_97
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
Fluorine is more electronegative than anything else under any circumstances. I think you mean to ask which was more negatively charged or electron-dense.
Yeah, I did, thanks for that would it be the same referring to the electron density?
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Protoxylic
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(Original post by ellie.b_97)
Yeah, I did, thanks for that would it be the same referring to the electron density?
Electronegativity is the ability to attract electron density within a covalent bond. Electron density is what it says, so although they are linked, they are not equivalent.
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ellie.b_97
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(Original post by Protoxylic)
Electronegativity is the ability to attract electron density within a covalent bond. Electron density is what it says, so although they are linked, they are not equivalent.
Thanks! Would that mean then that Fluorine would have a lower electron density as it has less electrons than Sulphur?
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Protoxylic
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(Original post by ellie.b_97)
Thanks! Would that mean then that Fluorine would have a lower electron density as it has less electrons than Sulphur?
If you take electron density to be the number of electrons per nucleus then yes. However if you took it as the number of electrons per unit volume, you have to take into account atomic radius.
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ellie.b_97
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(Original post by Protoxylic)
If you take electron density to be the number of electrons per nucleus then yes. However if you took it as the number of electrons per unit volume, you have to take into account atomic radius.
Okeydokey thank you so much!
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