l.josh22
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
Transition metals have a number of properties where they differ from other metals in the periodic table. Discuss these differences in terms of high densities, high melting and boiling points, ionisation energies, variable oxidation states and complex formation.
please provide detail in answer
0
reply
charco
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
(Original post by l.josh22)
Transition metals have a number of properties where they differ from other metals in the periodic table. Discuss these differences in terms of high densities, high melting and boiling points, ionisation energies, variable oxidation states and complex formation.
please provide detail in answer
You seem to think that TSR is there to do your homework.
Think again ...
0
reply
l.josh22
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#3
A large radius/charge ratio is included when it comes to properties of transition metals. They also have a high melting/boiling point and a pretty high density too. Compounds are formed which are mostly paramagnetic. In these metals you also get formation of coloured compounds and ions. Filled with catalytic activity and stable complexes. They also exhibit a variation oxidation states.
One of the properties of transition metals is they are denser than the s-block elements and their densities start increasing from atomic number 21 to copper. This increase in density as you move from atomic number 21 to atomic number 63 is due to relative increase in masses from 21 to 63

The transition metals have high melting and boiling points when compared to elements in the s-block. This is explained by strong silver bonding between atoms of d-block elements. This explains also why the transition elements have high molar enthalpies. The strong bonds of this metals comes about due to presence of delocalized electrons.

Ionization energies increase from atomic number 21 to copper which is in atomic number 63. This is explained by increase in valence electrons which is up to 4 in some elements in the transition metals. Elements having more than four valence electrons start to show gradual reduction of ionization energy. This is because the once the fifth and sixth electrons enter they occupy already occupied orbitals and this leads to inter-electron repulsions. Therefore, less energy is needed to remove the electron when in gaseous state.

Oxidation states have irregular trend as one moves from elements of lower atomic number to those elements of higher atomic number. It first increases gradually towards the centre of the transition metals in the periodic table and the start to decrease as u move towards the end of the table, that is from left to right.
(Original post by charco)
You seem to think that TSR is there to do your homework.
Think again ...
0
reply
l.josh22
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#4
ok
(Original post by l.josh22)
A large radius/charge ratio is included when it comes to properties of transition metals. They also have a high melting/boiling point and a pretty high density too. Compounds are formed which are mostly paramagnetic. In these metals you also get formation of coloured compounds and ions. Filled with catalytic activity and stable complexes. They also exhibit a variation oxidation states.
One of the properties of transition metals is they are denser than the s-block elements and their densities start increasing from atomic number 21 to copper. This increase in density as you move from atomic number 21 to atomic number 63 is due to relative increase in masses from 21 to 63

The transition metals have high melting and boiling points when compared to elements in the s-block. This is explained by strong silver bonding between atoms of d-block elements. This explains also why the transition elements have high molar enthalpies. The strong bonds of this metals comes about due to presence of delocalized electrons.

Ionization energies increase from atomic number 21 to copper which is in atomic number 63. This is explained by increase in valence electrons which is up to 4 in some elements in the transition metals. Elements having more than four valence electrons start to show gradual reduction of ionization energy. This is because the once the fifth and sixth electrons enter they occupy already occupied orbitals and this leads to inter-electron repulsions. Therefore, less energy is needed to remove the electron when in gaseous state.

Oxidation states have irregular trend as one moves from elements of lower atomic number to those elements of higher atomic number. It first increases gradually towards the centre of the transition metals in the periodic table and the start to decrease as u move towards the end of the table, that is from left to right.
0
reply
l.josh22
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#5
already had my answer ready. Just wanted to confirm it was right. I done the work myself, just needed confirmation or additional help
(Original post by charco)
You seem to think that TSR is there to do your homework.
Think again ...
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Surrey
    Postgraduate Open Afternoon Postgraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Bristol
    Undergraduate Open Afternoon Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19

Would you turn to a teacher if you were being bullied?

Yes (22)
24.72%
No (67)
75.28%

Watched Threads

View All