Can someone please write the answer to this please !!!

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User6707078
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Read the following extract from Act 5 Scene 1(line 30 - 55) of Macbeth and then answer the question
'Lady Macbeth is a female character who changes during the play'
Starting with this moment in the play, explore how far you agree with this view.
Write about: how Shakespeare presents Lady Macbeth in that part of the extract how far Shakespeare presents Lady Macbeth as a female character who changes in the play as a whole. [30 marks]
A04[4 marks ]
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ConfusedDemon
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Ahhhh I love this essay question! I got a 9 in my English GCSE, so I can totally help you.
For your first paragraph, you'd want to do the introduction for Lady Macbeth, so all of your points would have to be in the first paragraph, not all of them together, but evenly spaced out. Act 5 scene 1 is when she sleepwalks, so you can make roughly 4 or 5 good points for Lady Macbeth after the introduction, such as
1. Despite being psychologically disturbed, she still has a commanding poise to her, as shown in "Out, damned spot! Out, I say!" (Use of exclamatives, and command words, etc.)
But Im not sure the question is worded correctly. Is it the whole play, or just the extract?
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emmayyo
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You could make the point that at the beginning of the play, she demonstrates a strong sense of ambition, this is shown in the quotes 'unsex me here', 'make think my blood' 'take my milk for gall' - she is willing to take something natural and life-giving and replace it with something sour and poisonous so that she is able to commit acts of treason and treachery. Yet as the play progresses, her steely resolve begins to disappear and she becomes fragile and weak. Macbeth refers to her as ‘chuck’ - a slang term used to describe chickens - he is labelling her as helpless which is far removed from his earlier comment that she should bring forth only male children due to her steely ambition and resolve (‘bring forth men-children only’). This idea is enhanced further in the fact that at the start of the play, Lady macbeth washes the blood of her hands with ease (‘ a little water clears us of this deed’) yet by Act 5 scene 1 she is plagued with guilt and grows insane, unable to clean the imaginary blood from her hands (‘out damned spot!’). This insanity grows and festers, eventually causing her to commit suicide.
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Fire00101
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(Original post by ConfusedDemon)
Ahhhh I love this essay question! I got a 9 in my English GCSE, so I can totally help you.
For your first paragraph, you'd want to do the introduction for Lady Macbeth, so all of your points would have to be in the first paragraph, not all of them together, but evenly spaced out. Act 5 scene 1 is when she sleepwalks, so you can make roughly 4 or 5 good points for Lady Macbeth after the introduction, such as
1. Despite being psychologically disturbed, she still has a commanding poise to her, as shown in "Out, damned spot! Out, I say!" (Use of exclamatives, and command words, etc.)
But Im not sure the question is worded correctly. Is it the whole play, or just the extract?
Could you please give an example on how you would write the introduction. I am also struggling on this question. Specifically on how to start it.
Last edited by Fire00101; 1 month ago
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ROTL94
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No. Do your own work, it was set for you, not for me.
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ConfusedDemon
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(Original post by Fire00101)
Could you please give an example on how you would write the introduction. I am also struggling on this question. Specifically on how to start it.
Sure, I've gotten an old one that was meant for Macbeth. I hope it'll do!

Macbeth, our eponymous tragic hero, fits the role of the typical Aristotelian tragic hero. Shakespeare presents Macbeth as “noble,” and “valiant,” in the opening of the play however his psychological and physical state deteriorates after his murder of King Duncan after Act 2 scene 1. Macbeth, set in Scotland explores the key themes of power and the corruption of it when entitled to an excessive amount of it. Shakespeare portrays the character of Macbeth as the ideal Jacobean general, with valour and explores the duplicitous nature of a man when confronted with too much power or knowledge, and eventually leading to the ultimate depiction which leaves their fate to be set in stone. Ultimately as Macbeth defies the great chain of being, it leads to his psychological deterioration towards the end of the play. Shakespeare hints that Witches, being creatures of chaos, can change even the most loyal of men which could lead the reader questioning as which could leave the audience thinking: Is loyalty eternal?
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Fire00101
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(Original post by ConfusedDemon)
Sure, I've gotten an old one that was meant for Macbeth. I hope it'll do!

Macbeth, our eponymous tragic hero, fits the role of the typical Aristotelian tragic hero. Shakespeare presents Macbeth as “noble,” and “valiant,” in the opening of the play however his psychological and physical state deteriorates after his murder of King Duncan after Act 2 scene 1. Macbeth, set in Scotland explores the key themes of power and the corruption of it when entitled to an excessive amount of it. Shakespeare portrays the character of Macbeth as the ideal Jacobean general, with valour and explores the duplicitous nature of a man when confronted with too much power or knowledge, and eventually leading to the ultimate depiction which leaves their fate to be set in stone. Ultimately as Macbeth defies the great chain of being, it leads to his psychological deterioration towards the end of the play. Shakespeare hints that Witches, being creatures of chaos, can change even the most loyal of men which could lead the reader questioning as which could leave the audience thinking: Is loyalty eternal?
Thank you for the help
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dhrubo18
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(Original post by ROTL94)
No. Do your own work, it was set for you, not for me.
Don't know?
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dhrubo18
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You don't know like me?
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dhrubo18
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👍👍
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ConfusedDemon
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(Original post by Fire00101)
Thank you for the help
No worries!
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