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Career advice at school - Is it useful?

Poll

Career advice at school - Is it useful?

Do schools give useful career advice, or are students just steered to go to university to study any degree course regardless of employability and future career paths? Have been made aware that some schools are steering students down paths that help boost the school's reputation and ignore career opportunities. Is there a split ie Russell Group (RG) university potential, non-RG university potential, Further Education potential (Accounting (AAT), Construction, Hairdressing, Plumbing, and other trades), and those with no career direction are steered to the armed forces, but only if they gain GCSE Maths, English, a Science, and 2 more subjects)?
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by Kinga88
Do schools give useful career advice, or are students just steered to go to university to study any degree course regardless of employability and future career paths? Have been made aware that some schools are steering students down paths that help boost the school's reputation and ignore career opportunities. Is there a split ie Russell Group (RG) university potential, non-RG university potential, Further Education potential (Accounting (AAT), Construction, Hairdressing, Plumbing, and other trades), and those classified no-hope / no career direction (sometimes steered to armed forces if gain GCSE Maths, English, Science, and 2 more subjects)?


It may have changed since I was at school. But I do think that schools could do more in the way if careers advice.
In year 10/11 I think that schools should give people more guidance into different options e.g. college courses, apprenticeships, 6th form etc. My sister did an apprenticeship but they weren't really talked about much when she applied for hers (she got info about hers because my auntie worked there). Armed forces wasn't even mentioned when me or my sister were at school and I think people should be at least given some info on it for if people want to go in that direction.
In 6th form I think there should be less focus on uni and more focus on other options too. When I went to 6th form it was all uni this and uni that and nothing else.
Yes and No. Depends on the career advice itself and the student's concrete ideas for a possible profession in the future.

I for instance would like to be informed about the tasks in a precise branch. Just to see whether the jobs I imagined for myself matches with my interests and attitude for the work or not.
Reply 3
Original post by Kallisto
Yes and No. Depends on the career advice itself and the student's concrete ideas for a possible profession in the future.

I for instance would like to be informed about the tasks in a precise branch. Just to see whether the jobs I imagined for myself matches with my interests and attitude for the work or not.

Interesting to learn that there is a shift away from everyone going to university to do any degree course. It's amazing to learn that some people go into debt and sacrifice their life-time earning potential to do courses that reduce their attractiveness for employers just so that they can go to a university, and that does include RG universities - the so-called elite ones in the UK.

https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/rishi-sunak-wants-to-phase-out-degrees-tha - interesting to learn that t-do-not-improve-earning-potential/

Look at apprenticeships in the following areas:

If you are interested in business - look at AAT, as it will give you a stable career, unlike marketing, which is increasingly a short-term project focused area of business.

If you want to work in Real Estate, Construction, and Architecture then look at Leeds College of Building and UCEM

Maritime careers - look at Warsash College

Fashion - do a tailoring apprenticeship at Jermyn Street in London, rather go into a high street store.

If you do a course at one of these and if you still feel the need

Journalism and media - look at Highbury College

Human Resources - CIPD run a range of courses. Focus on Employment Law and Selection - think about Recruitment too

Remember that there have been some very successful people who didn't go to university, but who kept learning their trade and crucially the key business skills (finance, statistics - inventory (product and services), marketing, PR, contract law, and IT driven business development - using CRM/spreadsheets, etc to segment and track customers). Being able to do these and continually engaging with customers and competitors to learn how to improve will make you a winner, as most people do the minimum. Build your reputation and keep a blog.
Reply 4
Original post by Emma:-)
It may have changed since I was at school. But I do think that schools could do more in the way if careers advice.
In year 10/11 I think that schools should give people more guidance into different options e.g. college courses, apprenticeships, 6th form etc. My sister did an apprenticeship but they weren't really talked about much when she applied for hers (she got info about hers because my auntie worked there). Armed forces wasn't even mentioned when me or my sister were at school and I think people should be at least given some info on it for if people want to go in that direction.
In 6th form I think there should be less focus on uni and more focus on other options too. When I went to 6th form it was all uni this and uni that and nothing else.


I think that does actually happen now. At the school I used to teach in and the college I now work at, both have full time careers advisors who give 1-1 advice as well as arranging work experience and trips.
Reply 5
Original post by hotpud
I think that does actually happen now. At the school I used to teach in and the college I now work at, both have full time careers advisors who give 1-1 advice as well as arranging work experience and trips.


It would be nice to know which careers were more stable than others. For example I looked at marketing jobs on several online job boards and most seemed to be fixed term jobs that would last for up to 9 months. In contrast teaching roles are very rarely for 1 year, and most are permanent with a career pathway.
Reply 6
Original post by Kinga88
It would be nice to know which careers were more stable than others. For example I looked at marketing jobs on several online job boards and most seemed to be fixed term jobs that would last for up to 9 months. In contrast teaching roles are very rarely for 1 year, and most are permanent with a career pathway.

Why is that important? There are permanent and temporary roles in just about every profession to suit the needs to specific business or organisation requirements. You can get full time work in marketing and one year or one day fixed term contracts in teaching. No job is secure so what we really need to do is make our children resilient and adaptable because people like that are the ones who are going to succeed in our ever changing economy.
Original post by Kinga88
Interesting to learn that there is a shift away from everyone going to university to do any degree course. It's amazing to learn that some people go into debt and sacrifice their life-time earning potential to do courses that reduce their attractiveness for employers just so that they can go to a university, and that does include RG universities - the so-called elite ones in the UK.

https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/rishi-sunak-wants-to-phase-out-degrees-tha - interesting to learn that t-do-not-improve-earning-potential/

Look at apprenticeships in the following areas:

If you are interested in business - look at AAT, as it will give you a stable career, unlike marketing, which is increasingly a short-term project focused area of business.

If you want to work in Real Estate, Construction, and Architecture then look at Leeds College of Building and UCEM

Maritime careers - look at Warsash College

Fashion - do a tailoring apprenticeship at Jermyn Street in London, rather go into a high street store.

If you do a course at one of these and if you still feel the need

Journalism and media - look at Highbury College

Human Resources - CIPD run a range of courses. Focus on Employment Law and Selection - think about Recruitment too

Remember that there have been some very successful people who didn't go to university, but who kept learning their trade and crucially the key business skills (finance, statistics - inventory (product and services), marketing, PR, contract law, and IT driven business development - using CRM/spreadsheets, etc to segment and track customers). Being able to do these and continually engaging with customers and competitors to learn how to improve will make you a winner, as most people do the minimum. Build your reputation and keep a blog.

the Armed Services are not are not full of no hopes their many career paths some people entry the Armed Services with few or even no qualifications because of poor educational experience. The Armed Services look at what a recruit is able to because not how well they did at school many people fail the recruitment process.
Reply 8
Original post by looloo2134
the Armed Services are not are not full of no hopes their many career paths some people entry the Armed Services with few or even no qualifications because of poor educational experience. The Armed Services look at what a recruit is able to because not how well they did at school many people fail the recruitment process.

Very true. I have known several people who struggled at school, but who thrived in the armed forces and seized the career opportunities available. One of whom went on to RMAS and eventually became a very senior officer!
Reply 9
Mine was terrible but the last school I worked at actually had a dead good setup
From my personal experience, no.
The carer's advisor basically said i wouldn't be able to get into uni, yet here i am now with a degree and a PGCE.

Honestly don't think carer's advisors in sixth form/college have sufficient knowledge in all fields to fully support students.
Reply 11
Original post by 1secondsofvamps
From my personal experience, no.
The carer's advisor basically said i wouldn't be able to get into uni, yet here i am now with a degree and a PGCE.

Honestly don't think carer's advisors in sixth form/college have sufficient knowledge in all fields to fully support students.


I have heard similar from other people. Most career advisors have no or minimal knowledge beyond their job. Many push going to university regardless of the benefit or not of going to university regardless of the degree subject, just so the school can say that majority of their students go to uni when they leave.

One local comprehensive school I know aims to gives their students a sense of purpose and a sense of worth, as it has a policy of steering students towards professionally accredited degrees e.g. Law, Real Estate & Construction, Engineering, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Accounting, Dentistry, Architecture, Journalism, and Education, as they will have a life-long career. Those that don't want to go to university are steered towards apprenticeships that will give the person a trade. They have a very active careers department that run regular i.e. monthly career area specific events where employers visit the school. They also try and arrange 'taster days' at employers' offices. They have an active old students' network, which further enhances the school's ability to offer careers advice and programmes for students. For example the Maths club, which those that struggle at Maths are encouraged to join offers maths projects with local employers, which are invariably run by parents or former parents of students at the school. The Maths club regularly helps run the school canteen and stationery - inventory, pricing, budgeting, demand patterns, etc - just so students get to realise the importance of maths in a practical setting. Those that struggle with writing and reading are encouraged to join the school blog, debating and drama societies. everything the school does is to guide a student towards a career, and to evaluate their career options.

Other local schools just focus on just teaching the curriculum at GCSEs, and at A-levels. Many students go on to do degree subjects with no career path when they graduate, such as Social Policy, Public Administration, Politics, hospitality Management, Travel & Tourism, Media Studies, and Sociology.
(edited 8 months ago)
Original post by Kinga88
Do schools give useful career advice, or are students just steered to go to university to study any degree course regardless of employability and future career paths? Have been made aware that some schools are steering students down paths that help boost the school's reputation and ignore career opportunities. Is there a split ie Russell Group (RG) university potential, non-RG university potential, Further Education potential (Accounting (AAT), Construction, Hairdressing, Plumbing, and other trades), and those with no career direction are steered to the armed forces, but only if they gain GCSE Maths, English, a Science, and 2 more subjects)?


It's important to note that the effectiveness of career advice may vary based on the quality of the school's career counseling program and the dedication of the advisors. Students are encouraged to actively engage with career advisors, ask questions, and seek out additional resources to make the most of the guidance provided. Career advice at school plays a crucial role in helping students make well-informed decisions about their future careers, setting them on a path towards success and personal fulfillment.
Mine was useless she saw my predicted grades and the meeting went like this and bear in mind I was 15

Me: I want to go to col
Her:NO you’ll never go to collage never mind university
Me : what abo
Her NO
Me: bu
Her NEVER
Me: What am I meant to do though.
Her: essentially Emptage you’ve failed at life.
I was 15 you can’t tell at that age now I have a honours degree I mean sure it took me 4 years at collage and it wasn’t easy but I go there so at school no it’s pretty useless.
When leaving year 11 (it may have changed now), I was told that A-levels were the best option as I did moderately well in GCSEs. The careers advisor also added it would be a waste of potential for me to do an apprenticeship or a B-tech. The advice felt cookie cutter if you are intelligent enough, you should do A-levels. I was burnt out and hated exams, so I did an apprenticeship and then did some work abroad. Eventually, I ended up doing access to HE course and got into UCL. So really, in the long run, the advice was not so great, and I always say to people to take career advice with a pinch of salt.
Mine just used google, and showed me everything I had already googled… no actual advice lol, just google and the .gov website. Take it with a grain of salt and ask people online directly about your career options (who are in industry)
Reply 16
Original post by Kinga88
Do schools give useful career advice, or are students just steered to go to university to study any degree course regardless of employability and future career paths? Have been made aware that some schools are steering students down paths that help boost the school's reputation and ignore career opportunities. Is there a split ie Russell Group (RG) university potential, non-RG university potential, Further Education potential (Accounting (AAT), Construction, Hairdressing, Plumbing, and other trades), and those with no career direction are steered to the armed forces, but only if they gain GCSE Maths, English, a Science, and 2 more subjects)?


It,s needed. I am the one who is providing a free digital marketing and software development course for students. Anyone wants to subscribe let me know
Reply 17
Original post by Elizabeth2002h
When leaving year 11 (it may have changed now), I was told that A-levels were the best option as I did moderately well in GCSEs. The careers advisor also added it would be a waste of potential for me to do an apprenticeship or a B-tech. The advice felt cookie cutter if you are intelligent enough, you should do A-levels. I was burnt out and hated exams, so I did an apprenticeship and then did some work abroad. Eventually, I ended up doing access to HE course and got into UCL. So really, in the long run, the advice was not so great, and I always say to people to take career advice with a pinch of salt.


I have come across a similar story, except the person ended up going to Durham to study Computer Science and Maths and Oxford to do Machine Learning and Statistics DPhil, and the school told him that he should work in retail when he was 15!
Reply 18
Original post by Bolognacoffee
Mine just used google, and showed me everything I had already googled… no actual advice lol, just google and the .gov website. Take it with a grain of salt and ask people online directly about your career options (who are in industry)


Very true! LinkedIn profiles can be used to know the best qualifications and experience to get into and do well in particular industries/sectors. Some schools have a tendency to encourage students to do degree courses that will not help their career prospects, just so they can say X% of their students go to university, such as hospitality degrees.

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