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Maths question

Please could someone help me on the question below? Surely the two statements will be equivalent because if you integrate the second equation it gives the first one but the markscheme says p—>q? Thanks!
(edited 12 months ago)
Reply 1
What do you get when you (indefinite) integrate?
(edited 12 months ago)
Reply 2
To basically tell you the solution outright in case mqb hint doesn't click, here's a counterexample in spoilers on why Q implies P is false:

Spoiler


I think it's a good practice to find specific counterexamples to show a statement is false.
Or if the statement is true, prove it. Don't skip it.
(edited 12 months ago)
Reply 3
Original post by Ashirs
Please could someone help me on the question below? Surely the two statements will be equivalent because if you integrate the second equation it gives the first one but the markscheme says p—>q? Thanks!

This is what I got when I integrated the second statement and it was the same as the first one.
Original post by Ashirs
This is what I got when I integrated the second statement and it was the same as the first one.

I think you are missing something

Spoiler

Reply 5
Original post by tonyiptony
To basically tell you the solution outright in case mqb hint doesn't click, here's a counterexample in spoilers on why Q implies P is false:

Spoiler


I think it's a good practice to find specific counterexamples to show a statement is false.
Or if the statement is true, prove it. Don't skip it.


Sorry please could you explain what a derivative is and why you have decided to pick a random number?
Reply 6
Original post by TypicalNerd
I think you are missing something

Spoiler



Ohh I was supposed to add c?
So that means the integrated version of the second equation will n it be equal to the first equation because of c (whatever integer that would be?)
Original post by Ashirs
Ohh I was supposed to add c?
So that means the integrated version of the second equation will n it be equal to the first equation because of c (whatever integer that would be?)

Yes, you add on the + c.

The function y = 3x^5 - 4x^2 + 12x is the case where the constant c = 0.

But that’s only one possible case - what if the c was 1? After all, in theory, the c could be anything.
Reply 8
Original post by TypicalNerd
Yes, you add on the + c.

The function y = 3x^5 - 4x^2 + 12x is the case where the constant c = 0.

But that’s only one possible case - what if the c was 1? After all, in theory, the c could be anything.

This makes much more sense, thanks!
Original post by Ashirs
Sorry please could you explain what a derivative is and why you have decided to pick a random number?


For future reference, a derivative is the result of differentiating a function.

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