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    I have been wondering this for a while.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    I have been wondering this for a while.
    Anthropology is more respected
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    (Original post by bono)
    Anthropology is more respected
    True.
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    Anthopology

    Sociology

    Anthropology seems to be more wide ranging than sociology.
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    looking at the derivations anthropology should be the study of mankind as a whole, (possibly the entire species?), while sociology is the study of mankinds interactions with one another.

    I think antropology has been around for much longer, and is closely connected with archeaology
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    (Original post by winorloose)
    I think antropology has been around for much longer, and is closely connected with archeaology
    As a budding archaeologist I see anthropology as 'modern day archaeology'. Archaeology in the USA is oonly considered a sub-sect of Anthropology; they are very closely linked!

    It seems to be more culture focused & wide ranging, covering every aspect humanity as opposed to just society.

    If I get the grades in the summer I'll be starting an Archaeology & Anthropology tripos...I'll let you know then...to be honest I don't really know much about anthropology, just see is as a rather cool expansion of archaeology that has so many benefits! I had a Social Anthropology interview at Cambridge...hard going but intriging! (sp?)
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    Traditionally, anthropologists have focused on the study of tribal peoples and gathered information predominantly through field research, participant observation, and other qualitative methods.

    Likewise, sociologists emphasized the study of industrial societies and tended to use more quantitative methods like surveys and questionnaires.

    However, these distinctions between the two disciplines have become blurred over the last few decades. More and more anthropologists study urban life in Western societies and increasing numbers of sociologists focus on peasant or tribal societies. Contemporary scholars from either discipline often use the theories and the methods of the other.
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    (Original post by bono)
    Anthropology is more respected
    is it still around in the academic world? i.e. could one study it if they so wished? Don't recall seeing it in any prospectuses I looked at :confused:
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    (Original post by rednirt)
    is it still around in the academic world? i.e. could one study it if they so wished? Don't recall seeing it in any prospectuses I looked at :confused:
    yea it is but i wouldnt say it is the most academic subject ever
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    (Original post by rednirt)
    is it still around in the academic world? i.e. could one study it if they so wished? Don't recall seeing it in any prospectuses I looked at :confused:
    I was referring generally.

    e.g.) An anthropologist may be favoured to a sociologist in the loose sense of the word (favoured as in "their subject area is seen as more advanced")
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    (Original post by bono)
    I was referring generally.

    e.g.) An anthropologist may be favoured to a sociologist in the loose sense of the word (favoured as in "their subject area is seen as more advanced")
    hey bono sup u wanan become an anthropologist? :cool:
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    (Original post by bono)
    I was referring generally.

    e.g.) An anthropologist may be favoured to a sociologist in the loose sense of the word (favoured as in "their subject area is seen as more advanced")
    I was merely asking as its an intersting subject - we study dribs and drabs in psych and crim, but would be interested in looking more into the subject.
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    (Original post by rednirt)
    I was merely asking as its an intersting subject - we study dribs and drabs in psych and crim, but would be interested in looking more into the subject.

    It is possible to study it!! I might be! (as part of a tripos with archaeology!)
    I know for sure Durham, Oxford, UCL, Cambridge, SOAS have anthropology courses, there are bound to be more! They all make it seem really cool, you get to live with a tribe as part of the course...ethnographic studies! Since applying to Cambridge, I've become really interested in ethnoarchaeology, living with modern people & studying them as a way of understanding similar past peoples...I'd love to go live in Peru for a couple of months!
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    anthropology is moving toward a Human Rights focus to make up for its horrid past. though you wouldn't find this at university unless you're lucky enough as i was to have one or two professors who aren't stuck in the dark ages.

    anthropology has done a lot of harm to a lot of people; for example, one of the main guys-who-went-to-live-with-Tribes-and-study-them, kroeber, wrote that certain Native American groups have an "anal" personality (thanks to freud). which to other anthros didn't necessarily mean much bad or good, because freud had these strange classifications for EVERYONE, and everyone was using them. but when other people got hold it of, it led to U.S. government officials removing these groups' children. governments have (and still do; colonization is still rampant) sent anthropologists to places they want to colonize, to find out more about the people--so as to better conquer them and exploit their resources. even just "studying" a People frames them as scientific objects and not as humans.

    archaeology and physical/biological anthropology(study of the physical human) are guilty of stealing sacred objects necessary for religious life and of keeping peoples' ancestors locked up in university and museum basements, where according to those Peoples' knowledges, their souls are trapped; also guilty of spreading human-origin and migration theories willy-nilly which have affected governmental policies toward Indigenous Peoples.

    and these are just a few examples.

    so now anthropology beginning to redeem itself a bit by, for example, working FOR Indigenous Peoples and other groups to fight governments that try to screw them over.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    Traditionally, anthropologists have focused on the study of tribal peoples and gathered information predominantly through field research, participant observation, and other qualitative methods.

    Likewise, sociologists emphasized the study of industrial societies and tended to use more quantitative methods like surveys and questionnaires.

    However, these distinctions between the two disciplines have become blurred over the last few decades. More and more anthropologists study urban life in Western societies and increasing numbers of sociologists focus on peasant or tribal societies. Contemporary scholars from either discipline often use the theories and the methods of the other.
    Could you give us a source for that quotation.

    Thank you in advance.
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    Depends what anthropolgy your talking about. Biological anthropology looks at behaviours and characteristics of past homonid tribes and homo sapien culture over the past 200,000 years. Thats what i did on my course
 
 
 
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