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    Hi there,

    Can someone please help me identify the labelled structures.

    I know the following:

    F Cytoplasm
    G - Mitochondria
    K- i think it is villi (please check)
    E - i think it is ribosomes (please check)
    J -No idea
    H - No idea
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    K = Microvilli. This is microvilli and not villi because Villi is how the endothelial cells are arranged themselves and microvilli are the small projections on the cell and so they are smaller, hence the use of "micro-".

    E = Vesicles released by the Golgi Apparatus

    J = Golgi Apparatus. You can tell because there are vesicles around it which have been released by it and because of the "stacked" shape.

    H = Rough endoplasmic reticulum
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    (Original post by Linked)
    Hi there,

    Can someone please help me identify the labelled structures.

    I know the following:

    F Cytoplasm
    G - Mitochondria
    K- i think it is villi (please check)
    E - i think it is ribosomes (please check)
    J -No idea
    H - No idea
    All of the answers you have given look great so far
    I have checked K and E for you - K looks correct, although I think that E represents vesicles (the small black dots are the ribosomes).
    J is the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and H is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (do you need to to know the functions for each as well?).

    I hope that helps
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    (Original post by Insanity514)
    K = Microvilli

    E = Vesicles released by the Golgi Apparatus

    J = Golgi Apparatus

    H = Rough endoplasmic reticulum
    I'm sorry for basically reposting what you just posted, this happens to me a lot on these threads xD
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    (Original post by Linked)
    Hi there,

    Can someone please help me identify the labelled structures.

    I know the following:

    F Cytoplasm
    G - Mitochondria
    K- i think it is villi (please check)
    E - i think it is ribosomes (please check)
    J -No idea
    H - No idea
    I think J is either smooth endoplasmic reticulum or golgi apparatus, but it think it's probably the smooth endo ....

    H is rough endplasmic reticulum

    K is villi

    E is either are lysosomes, the small black dots are ribosomes.
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    (Original post by zef1995)
    All of the answers you have given look great so far
    I have checked K and E for you - K looks correct, although I think that E represents vesicles (the small black dots are the ribosomes).
    J is the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and H is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (do you need to to know the functions for each as well?).

    I hope that helps
    Pretty sure K is microvilli and J is Golgi Apparatus

    Edits: no worries about reposting...no need to apologise
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    (Original post by Insanity514)
    Pretty sure K is microvilli and J is Golgi Apparatus

    Edits: no worries about reposting...no need to apologise
    Oh yeah, I see where you're coming from, damn me and my technical terms :P With respect to J, I think from first glance I thought it was the smooth endoplasmic reticulum due to its appearance, but looking back at it I see your point!

    Thank you

    Also, to Linked, I'm sorry if I have confused you with my mistakes! That was not my intention.
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    J is most definitely not the smooth endoplasmic reticular. Endoplasmic reticuli are not free-standing bodies in the cell. Like Insanity514 has said: the Golgi has a stacked appearance.

    To OP: easy way to tell the difference between smooth ER and rough ER is just what they sound like. Rough has a 'rough' looking surface because it's got loads of ribosomes on it. Smooth ER looks the same, but without the ribosome.
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    (Original post by zef1995)
    All of the answers you have given look great so far
    I have checked K and E for you - K looks correct, although I think that E represents vesicles (the small black dots are the ribosomes).
    J is the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and H is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (do you need to to know the functions for each as well?).

    I hope that helps
    thanks for your input!
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    (Original post by Insanity514)
    K = Microvilli. This is microvilli and not villi because Villi is how the endothelial cells are arranged themselves and microvilli are the small projections on the cell and so they are smaller, hence the use of "micro-".

    E = Vesicles released by the Golgi Apparatus

    J = Golgi Apparatus. You can tell because there are vesicles around it which have been released by it and because of the "stacked" shape.

    H = Rough endoplasmic reticulum
    thanks for your input!
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    (Original post by zef1995)
    Oh yeah, I see where you're coming from, damn me and my technical terms :P With respect to J, I think from first glance I thought it was the smooth endoplasmic reticulum due to its appearance, but looking back at it I see your point!

    Thank you

    Also, to Linked, I'm sorry if I have confused you with my mistakes! That was not my intention.

    Don't worry it allows me to understand better because I can see the reasons where you might have gone wrong.
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    J is most definitely not the smooth endoplasmic reticular. Endoplasmic reticuli are not free-standing bodies in the cell. Like Insanity514 has said: the Golgi has a stacked appearance.

    To OP: easy way to tell the difference between smooth ER and rough ER is just what they sound like. Rough has a 'rough' looking surface because it's got loads of ribosomes on it. Smooth ER looks the same, but without the ribosome.

    thanks for your help. And the great tip too!
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    (Original post by Linked)
    Hi there,

    Can someone please help me identify the labelled structures.

    I know the following:

    F Cytoplasm
    G - Mitochondria
    K- i think it is villi (please check)
    E - i think it is ribosomes (please check)
    J -No idea
    H - No idea
    What is this for gcse as a2 cause its looks pretty easy for an as question,I have this fascination for cells I love how everything has a purpose I just think there really cool
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    (Original post by Victoriapownall)
    What is this for gcse as a2 cause its looks pretty easy for an as question,I have this fascination for cells I love how everything has a purpose I just think there really cool
    it is not
    a question in a paperr, but you have to be able to identify the organelles
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    (Original post by zef1995)
    All of the answers you have given look great so far
    I have checked K and E for you - K looks correct, although I think that E represents vesicles (the small black dots are the ribosomes).
    J is the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and H is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (do you need to to know the functions for each as well?).

    I hope that helps
    that will be really helpful if you could outline their functions for me too.

    oh also for golgi apparatus because that confuses me a lot.
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    (Original post by Linked)
    that will be really helpful if you could outline their functions for me too.

    oh also for golgi apparatus because that confuses me a lot.
    You should have notes on this stuff! Otherwise Google/Wikipedia will provide all your answers. You're basically asking us to make your notes for you as it is now. If you're stuck with understanding the function of an organelle as it is now, I'm sure people would be more happy to help, and it'd be more useful for you.
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    (Original post by Linked)
    Don't worry it allows me to understand better because I can see the reasons where you might have gone wrong.
    Yeah, it was a silly mistake on my part, but at least you now know what kind of mistakes can be made :P

    (Original post by Linked)
    that will be really helpful if you could outline their functions for me too.

    oh also for golgi apparatus because that confuses me a lot.
    You may know some of the functions already, but with respect to the organelles represented in your original post:

    Cytoplasm: the fluid that fills a cell. It's where a lot of cellular reactions take place (as metabolic processes generally take place in solution). Organelles are also contained in the cytoplasm.

    Mitochondria: Where aerobic respiration takes place. It produces ATP for a cell to utilise, and ATP is essential for metabolic process such as protein synthesis etc.

    Microvilli: Cellular projections that provide a high surface area. If a cell needs to take ions or other substances, the large surface area allows the cell to take up lots of it in a given time. An example could be for cells in the small intestine which have microvilli - the microvilli allow them to take up certain nutrients that pass through the small intestine.

    Vesicles: Formed from the Golgi Apparatus, they contain substances within a cell. They can release substances out of a cell by exocytosis by fusing with the plasma membrane and releasing their contents. However, some vesicles remain within the cell (some contain proteins that act as digestive enzymes - called lysosomes)

    Golgi Apparatus: A series of curved membranes enclosing a series of flattened sacs. It is a structure that constantly changes - at one side, vesicles already in the cell can fuse with it forming a new layer. At the other side, vesicles are being created by the Golgi Apparatus and these move away from the cell. Ot is where proteins can be packaged and processed - after protein synthesis (which occurs on the ribosomes), the proteins are packaged into vesicles which move to the Golgi Apparatus. They are 'folded' in to the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures (depending on the protein). For example, enzymes (which have a tertiary structure) have a specific 3D shape which allows them to carry out their function, and the Golgi Apparatus is essential in folding the original polypeptide chain correctly to create a specific protein. Once the polypeptide chain has been folded, it is packaged into Golgi vesicles which can release the protein out of the cell (by endocytosis), or the proteins can remain within the cell (I know that was a lot of waffle, but I hope it makes sense!).

    Last but not least...

    Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum: A network of membranes (fluid filled), which can be referred to as cisternae. The rough endoplasmic reticulum has ribosomes on the outside of it (represented by the black dots), and as you know this is where protein synthesis takes place. Once the polypeptides have been produced, the rough endoplasmic reticulum aids the transport of these polypeptides from the ribosomes to the Golgi Apparatus (where they will be packaged and processed). Vesicles can be formed off of the rough endoplasmic which allows for the transport of proteins to the Golgi Apparatus.

    I have checked over the information I have written, so I'm hoping there won't be any mistakes! However, if anybody else would like to add anything, or correct me if I'm wrong, please feel free

    I hope that helps!
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    (Original post by zef1995)
    Yeah, it was a silly mistake on my part, but at least you now know what kind of mistakes can be made :P



    You may know some of the functions already, but with respect to the organelles represented in your original post:

    Cytoplasm: the fluid that fills a cell. It's where a lot of cellular reactions take place (as metabolic processes generally take place in solution). Organelles are also contained in the cytoplasm.

    Mitochondria: Where aerobic respiration takes place. It produces ATP for a cell to utilise, and ATP is essential for metabolic process such as protein synthesis etc.

    Microvilli: Cellular projections that provide a high surface area. If a cell needs to take ions or other substances, the large surface area allows the cell to take up lots of it in a given time. An example could be for cells in the small intestine which have microvilli - the microvilli allow them to take up certain nutrients that pass through the small intestine.

    Vesicles: Formed from the Golgi Apparatus, they contain substances within a cell. They can release substances out of a cell by exocytosis by fusing with the plasma membrane and releasing their contents. However, some vesicles remain within the cell (some contain proteins that act as digestive enzymes - called lysosomes)

    Golgi Apparatus: A series of curved membranes enclosing a series of flattened sacs. It is a structure that constantly changes - at one side, vesicles already in the cell can fuse with it forming a new layer. At the other side, vesicles are being created by the Golgi Apparatus and these move away from the cell. Ot is where proteins can be packaged and processed - after protein synthesis (which occurs on the ribosomes), the proteins are packaged into vesicles which move to the Golgi Apparatus. They are 'folded' in to the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures (depending on the protein). For example, enzymes (which have a tertiary structure) have a specific 3D shape which allows them to carry out their function, and the Golgi Apparatus is essential in folding the original polypeptide chain correctly to create a specific protein. Once the polypeptide chain has been folded, it is packaged into Golgi vesicles which can release the protein out of the cell (by endocytosis), or the proteins can remain within the cell (I know that was a lot of waffle, but I hope it makes sense!).

    Last but not least...

    Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum: A network of membranes (fluid filled), which can be referred to as cisternae. The rough endoplasmic reticulum has ribosomes on the outside of it (represented by the black dots), and as you know this is where protein synthesis takes place. Once the polypeptides have been produced, the rough endoplasmic reticulum aids the transport of these polypeptides from the ribosomes to the Golgi Apparatus (where they will be packaged and processed). Vesicles can be formed off of the rough endoplasmic which allows for the transport of proteins to the Golgi Apparatus.

    I have checked over the information I have written, so I'm hoping there won't be any mistakes! However, if anybody else would like to add anything, or correct me if I'm wrong, please feel free

    I hope that helps!

    thanks a lot for your help. oh by the way do you do as biology now?
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    (Original post by Linked)
    thanks a lot for your help. oh by the way do you do as biology now?
    You're welcome, I hope that all made sense
    I did AS Biology last year, I'm currently studying A2 Biology!
 
 
 

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