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janon
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How long would it take to complete a PhD in physics, if you already had a masters degree in physics? What about for a Bsc in physics?
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CamSPSer
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(Original post by janon)
How long would it take to complete a PhD in physics, if you already had a masters degree in physics? What about for a Bsc in physics?
i believe three years is as long as it takes, if uve only got a BSc they might ask u 2 do a masters first
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Guiscard
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(Original post by janon)
How long would it take to complete a PhD in physics, if you already had a masters degree in physics? What about for a Bsc in physics?
3 years is the standard, though it might take up to 4. Usually, universities will require you to have a master's degree or equivalent, so you might have to do an Msc first.
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shiny
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
In arts/humanities yes - in science, engineering...no.

If you get the opportunity to do a 4 year UG masters then it's worthwhile, but don't spend up to £10k on a one yr post graduate masters course. A one year teaching course will not help hugely with a research degree.
In fact as an engineer you'd be expected to do an undergrad masters anyway.
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rb211524
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(Original post by janon)
How long would it take to complete a PhD in physics, if you already had a masters degree in physics? What about for a Bsc in physics?
If you get first or second class upper division in the Bsc degree, the minimum period to obtain a PhD degree is 3 years. The first year of a PhD degree programme is called the Probation year. Your performance in this year will determine whether you have the potential to become a PhD holder or not. If your professor finds that your potential is low, you will be end up with a MPhil degree. Some people may take up to six years to obtain a PhD degree
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d750
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(Original post by janon)
How long would it take to complete a PhD in physics, if you already had a masters degree in physics? What about for a Bsc in physics?
3 years is the minimum residency requirement, 'though you can count your master's year in some instances. In the humanities, it's standard to spend a further 6 months or so writing up, so the usual length is 3 1/2 years.
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Fluffy
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PQ'a figures lok right - mine took 3.5 years.

Also, the way PhD's (especially in sciences) are structured is changing.

PhD's where funded will be for 4 years to include a general 'techniques' learning first year. MRC, Wellcome and BBSRC have 'signed up' for this, as I do believe have the physics councils.

check out the Roberts Report on post grad education in the sciences....
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Fluffy
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(Original post by rb211524)
If you get first or second class upper division in the Bsc degree, the minimum period to obtain a PhD degree is 3 years.
Not true - my friend did his in 25 months, including writing up.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
I'm trying my best to avoid it (although I'll have to deal with it when it comes to Decembers HESES return - the changes are likely to mean the first 2 yrs are funded from the teaching grant rather than the research grant instead of the first 1 as is currently the case....)
Sir Gareth is the president of my College - we had it drummed into us all ')
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shiny
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(Original post by Fluffy)
Not true - my friend did his in 25 months, including writing up.
25 months? Did he incorporate a Masters year? Where was this?
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Fluffy
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(Original post by shiny)
25 months? Did he incorporate a Masters year? Where was this?
No - just the usual Probation research period, transfer viva then D.Phil status. This was at York. Also know peeps in Oxford who did it in less that 3 years - brainiacs!
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dazmanultra
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A friend did his Phd in computer science at cambridge in two years... he's now on a fairly hefty salary at Intel!
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shiny
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That's quite weird. I mean strictly speaking your research proposal should have sufficient depth to require at least three years of work. I am surprised that York or Cambridge would award PhDs for anything less than three years work, even if it is of the highest quality, because more can always be done.

Mine is going to last three years no matter how clever I am.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by shiny)
I am surprised that York or Cambridge would award PhDs for anything less than three years work, even if it is of the highest quality, because more can always be done.
In deed it can. My firend at York was offered a fellowship at Harvard, so wrote up his results. He had 7 top level publications, so had more than enough to submit. Some unis will let you submit papers rather than a thesis too - the number required is usually 4 or 5.

Also thesis usually have a word limit. If you've reached that limit, then what's the point in another 12 months of work that you can't really sumbit. You might as wlee go for viva and carry it on as a post doc (common practice in Oxford) where you get a better wage

Self funding students can often run out of money, so it's either 2 years of work down the drain or write up what you have and hope you have enough.

there are all sorts of reasons why you would want to submit early, and as your uni has a responsibility in part for your mental welfare, then they have to act accordingly.
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shiny
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#15
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I am going to do mine in 2 years as well now!
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