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    Hi, im really struggling with this question, please could someone answer with a detailed explanation?
    Thanks! (please see attached image)
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    (Original post by razzy02)
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    Hi, im really struggling with this question, please could someone answer with a detailed explanation?
    Thanks! (please see attached image)
    Well, let us know what you've tried already so we know what part you don't understand
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    (Original post by razzy02)
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    Hi, im really struggling with this question, please could someone answer with a detailed explanation?
    Thanks! (please see attached image)
    a) y=mx+c where m is the gradient just rearrange. in that form.
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    (Original post by junayd1998)
    a) y=mx+c where m is the gradient just rearrange. in that form.
    This doesn't actually work for this question, this is due to the question to having an  x^{2} in the equation instead of an  x like you suggested.

    This can actually be seen from the curve itself, it has a changing gradient unlike a straight line. So this means that differentiation is required to find the gradient at a specific point

    EDIT: But this specific question doesn't even require the use of calculus. See post below
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    This doesn't actually work for this question, this is due to the question to having an  x^{2} in the equation instead of an  x like you suggested.
    Without differentiation: if a (smooth) curve has a maximum/minimum value, the gradient there must be 0.

    I don't know the GCSE syllabus well enough to know if this is what they're expecting, but since they say "write down" I think that's what they're after here.

    The 2nd part (gradient at x=2) cannot be found like this but the question makes it clear that you're expected to do this by estimation.

    I don't think you're supposed to use calculus for this question at all.
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    (Original post by DFranklin)
    Without differentiation: if a (smooth) curve has a maximum/minimum value, the gradient there must be 0.

    I don't know the GCSE syllabus well enough to know if this is what they're expecting, but since they say "write down" I think that's what they're after here.

    The 2nd part (gradient at x=2) cannot be found like this but the question makes it clear that you're expected to do this by estimation.

    I don't think you're supposed to use calculus for this question at all.
    Oops! I didn't actually see that the maximum point was actually at x = 0, as I just skimmed over the question :rolleyes:
    Apologies for over-complicating the matter
 
 
 
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