Homeschooled but want to do DT GCSE

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venxs
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#1
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#1
To put it simply, I do online school ( homeschooled ) and want to do design technology for GCSE. Problem is, online schools aren't allowed to do design technology GCSE and I haven't seen any equivalents. Is there anywhere else I can take it for GCSE specifically? Ideally, keep my other classes at online school and go somewhere else specifically for DT?I kinda need design technology for GCSE due to the career I want to go in to, so this is a sticky one.Thanks
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djkaye
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The problem is you need to do a lot of practical work for DT, and this practical coursework needs to be assessed by a qualified DT teacher.

I don't think a DT GCSE is needed or even particularly desired by any career choice. All forms of engineering require maths (and own knowledge about DT components) - I can't think of any course where DT GCSE/A Level is a requirement, especially with strong maths grades. Could you clarify your career interests?
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venxs
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(Original post by djkaye)
The problem is you need to do a lot of practical work for DT, and this practical coursework needs to be assessed by a qualified DT teacher.

I don't think a DT GCSE is needed or even particularly desired by any career choice. All forms of engineering require maths (and own knowledge about DT components) - I can't think of any course where DT GCSE/A Level is a requirement, especially with strong maths grades. Could you clarify your career interests?
I either want to go in to product design or architecture
Even if it isn't necessary, I really do enjoy it- it would suck to not be able to do it
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#4
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(Original post by venxs)
I either want to go in to product design or architecture
Even if it isn't necessary, I really do enjoy it- it would suck to not be able to do it
I think your chances are slim because of the large element of non-examination assessment. However, there is an online Art course which may be of interest: https://www.artcoursework.com/courses/
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djkaye
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(Original post by venxs)
I either want to go in to product design or architecture
Even if it isn't necessary, I really do enjoy it- it would suck to not be able to do it
I really enjoyed DT. GCSE DT ruined all my love of DT. Every single moment of my free time was spent on coursework, and then my coursework ended up not working properly (30 A3 sheets of writeup also sucked).

For DT GCSE you really need to have access to all the equipment, a workshop and a teacher to assess your coursework. That's the main issue with doing it when homeschooled. I'm sure there's a way to do it if you really want to do it, but dont worry if not because it will not impact your career.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by djkaye)
The problem is you need to do a lot of practical work for DT, and this practical coursework needs to be assessed by a qualified DT teacher.

I don't think a DT GCSE is needed or even particularly desired by any career choice. All forms of engineering require maths (and own knowledge about DT components) - I can't think of any course where DT GCSE/A Level is a requirement, especially with strong maths grades. Could you clarify your career interests?
DT can be a preferred A level for Engineering especailly if you want to go into design.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by venxs)
I either want to go in to product design or architecture
Even if it isn't necessary, I really do enjoy it- it would suck to not be able to do it
Could you consider going to school if a part-time placement can be arranged?
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djkaye
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(Original post by Muttley79)
DT can be a preferred A level for Engineering especailly if you want to go into design.
For any course that recommends DT, I can guarantee further maths will go further (pun not intended). Engineering is open to anybody with strong understanding of maths , and a science subject like physics (or even chemistry) combined with further maths should be enough for every university.
Of course, you need to understand the theory of DT and they will probably ask you about it in interview (and better on personal statement). But It's definitely not a requirement
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Muttley79
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(Original post by djkaye)
For any course that recommends DT, I can guarantee further maths will go further (pun not intended). Engineering is open to anybody with strong understanding of maths , and a science subject like physics (or even chemistry) combined with further maths should be enough for every university.
Of course, you need to understand the theory of DT and they will probably ask you about it in interview (and better on personal statement). But It's definitely not a requirement
I'm a Maths eacher and some students take Maths, Physics and DT - they look at courses with a year in industry which are FAR better prep for industry.
They are getting jobs ahead of Oxbeidge people with little relevant experience ...
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(Original post by djkaye)
For any course that recommends DT, I can guarantee further maths will go further (pun not intended). Engineering is open to anybody with strong understanding of maths , and a science subject like physics (or even chemistry) combined with further maths should be enough for every university.
Of course, you need to understand the theory of DT and they will probably ask you about it in interview (and better on personal statement). But It's definitely not a requirement
Having read mechanical engineering, I'd agree that Further Maths was of more use than DT although DT would also have been helpful. My girls' school did not offer DT at any level past Year 9 and there was stuff I was missing but it was easier to pick up than becoming comfortable with - say - second order differential equations was for the single mathematicians.
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djkaye
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#11
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I'm a Maths eacher and some students take Maths, Physics and DT - they look at courses with a year in industry which are FAR better prep for industry.
They are getting jobs ahead of Oxbeidge people with little relevant experience ...
For many of those courses you don't neccessarily need DT (of course depending on industry experience requirements). Internships are also a good way to go for many subjects / types of engineering - although due to Covid these opportunities may be more limited.

What I'm trying to say is it's nice if you can take DT, and if you want DT it can be in handy but don't panick if you can't as if you're good in maths not having DT will not be a failure for most universities.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by djkaye)
For many of those courses you don't neccessarily need DT (of course depending on industry experience requirements). Internships are also a good way to go for many subjects / types of engineering - although due to Covid these opportunities may be more limited.

What I'm trying to say is it's nice if you can take DT, and if you want DT it can be in handy but don't panick if you can't as if you're good in maths not having DT will not be a failure for most universities.
It can be a real help though and if I were the OP I'd look into a flexible placement at a local school.
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username5507592
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#13
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I currently do DT GCSE in school and it's honestly a pain. Like someone above, I used to enjoy DT but GCSE ruined this. There is so much content to learn for a 2 hour exam worth half the total GCSE and the coursework is really time consuming. Most people are behind with coursework in my class but it's impossible to catch up on it and revise for mocks. Also, a teacher is probably needed to help with the coursework
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username5507592
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Student786198)
I currently do DT GCSE in school and it's honestly a pain. Like someone above, I used to enjoy DT but GCSE ruined this. There is so much content to learn for a 2 hour exam worth half the total GCSE and the coursework is really time consuming. Most people are behind with coursework in my class but it's impossible to catch up on it and revise for mocks. Also, a teacher is probably needed to help with the coursework
Also the 40 hours the exam board recommend for the coursework is false. I have only done about 20% and have easily spent over 10 hours as there is lots of detail you need to add to get the higher grades
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venxs
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#15
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#15
Wow, these responses were really helpful.

So what I'm getting from this is that if it's really necessary ( which it's not, ) I could find a placement with a local school specifically for DT.

Problem is, schools around here aren't exactly great- hence why I'm home schooled, so I guess I just won't do DT?
I'm going to take physics and maths anyway so I guess it isn't really a big issue.
But yeah, I'd much prefer if I could keep my love for the subject- even if it does mean sacrificing doing it at GCSE
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#16
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(Original post by venxs)
So what I'm getting from this is that if it's really necessary ( which it's not, ) I could find a placement with a local school specifically for DT.
I suspect that finding a local school that would let you do DT would be tricky. I can think of various issues round: insurance, child protection issues, the fact that you need to be there for more than just the lessons in the week to get the NEA done, someone having the goodwill to teach you and mark your work when they're not being paid to do it etc etc. Take the opportunity to make things at home if you can but you're making the right decision not to attempt GCSE DT.
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