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Electrostatic forces

Are electrostatic forces the forces between atoms like covalent bonds etc? do intermolecular forces count as electrostatic forces A level? Is electrostatic attraction just the attraction between the electrostatic forces?
Reply 1
1) An electrostatic force is the attraction between unlike charges. In this case, electrostatic forces are what hold metal and non metal atoms/nuclei together ionically. This is due to metals being positively charged & non-metals negatively charged.
2) Yes. All intermolecular forces are electrostatic in nature.
3) Yes.
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by K.online.
1) An electrostatic force is the attraction between unlike charges. In this case, electrostatic forces are what hold metal and non metal atoms/nuclei together covalently. This is due to metals being positively charged & non-metals negatively charged.
2) Yes. All intermolecular forces are electrostatic in nature.a

so are Ionic bonds an electrostatic force? If you are melting an ionic compound do you break or overcome the electrostatic attraction?
Reply 3
Original post by Rohan007best
Are electrostatic forces the forces between atoms like covalent bonds etc? do intermolecular forces count as electrostatic forces A level? Is electrostatic attraction just the attraction between the electrostatic forces?


Original post by Rohan007best
so are Ionic bonds an electrostatic force? If you are melting an ionic compound do you break or overcome the electrostatic attraction?


@TypicalNerd sorry for tagging u but u seem knowledgeable in this topic can you please explain these 2 questions?
Reply 4
Yes, ionic bonds are held together by electrostatic forces. You overcome those forces by meeting the energy requirement. The strength of the force you want to come is highly dependant on the charge of the ions. Overall, heating them should break/overcome those ionic bonds/forces of attraction.
Original post by Rohan007best
Are electrostatic forces the forces between atoms like covalent bonds etc? do intermolecular forces count as electrostatic forces A level? Is electrostatic attraction just the attraction between the electrostatic forces?

Electrostatic attraction is the collective term for attractive forces between opposite charges.

All types of chemical bonding involve electrostatic attraction: ionic bonds being electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions, covalent bonds being electrostatic attraction between positive nuclei and the negative shared pair(s) of electrons between them and metallic bonds being electrostatic attraction between regularly arranged metal cations and delocalised electrons, to give a few examples.

And yes, thermal energy is required to overcome the electrostatic attraction in ionic bonding.
Reply 6
Original post by K.online.
Yes, ionic bonds are held together by electrostatic forces. You overcome those forces by meeting the energy requirement. The strength of the force you want to come is highly dependant on the charge of the ions. Overall, heating them should break/overcome those ionic bonds/forces of attractioar

are u a gcse or a level student?
Reply 7
Original post by Rohan007best
are u a gcse or a level student?


GCSE
Reply 8
Original post by TypicalNerd
Electrostatic attraction is the collective term for attractive forces between opposite charges.

All types of chemical bonding involve electrostatic attraction: ionic bonds being electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions, covalent bonds being electrostatic attraction between positive nuclei and the negative shared pair(s) of electrons between them and metallic bonds being electrostatic attraction between regularly arranged metal cations and delocalised electrons, to give a few examples.

And yes, thermal energy is required to overcome the electrostatic attraction in ionic bonding.

This said everything that completely bypassed me. Yes, all chemical bonding involves electrostatic attraction. Ionic was just the first that came to mind.
Original post by K.online.
GCSE


For a GCSE student, you’ve given some good answers. Usually GCSE doesn’t link the strength of the ionic bonding to the charges on the ions, so it’s good to see you noticed that.
Original post by TypicalNerd
For a GCSE student, you’ve given some good answers. Usually GCSE doesn’t link the strength of the ionic bonding to the charges on the ions, so it’s good to see you noticed that.


Thank you. I have my first exams this week and I'm looking to get 8s across the board for the sciences before taking them up in college, so these are the things I have to know. I appreciate the feedback.
Original post by TypicalNerd
Electrostatic attraction is the collective term for attractive forces between opposite charges.

All types of chemical bonding involve electrostatic attraction: ionic bonds being electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions, covalent bonds being electrostatic attraction between positive nuclei and the negative shared pair(s) of electrons between them and metallic bonds being electrostatic attraction between regularly arranged metal cations and delocalised electrons, to give a few examples.

And yes, thermal energy is required to overcome the electrostatic attraction in ionic bonding.

So If you are melting an ionic compound do you break or overcome the ionic bonds?
I'm guessing you overcome the electrostatic attraction between the ions and break the ionic bonds themselves?
Original post by Rohan007best
So If you are melting an ionic compound do you break or overcome the ionic bonds?
I'm guessing you overcome the electrostatic attraction between the ions and break the ionic bonds themselves?

All you need to state in an exam is that the electrostatic attraction is overcome. Though that said, I’d say your guess is correct.
Original post by K.online.
Thank you. I have my first exams this week and I'm looking to get 8s across the board for the sciences before taking them up in college, so these are the things I have to know. I appreciate the feedback.

Best of luck for your GCSE’s, not that you’ll need it.

Just be careful not to give too much detail - examiners don’t appear to like it when you state things that aren’t on the syllabus.
Original post by TypicalNerd
All you need to state in an exam is that the electrostatic attraction is overcome. Though that said, I’d say your guess is correct.

this is for A level, right? Thanks for your help btw. My last question just to check I remember it properly metallic bonds are between metals covalent between non-metals and ionic between metal and non-metal right in A level?
Original post by TypicalNerd
Best of luck for your GCSE’s, not that you’ll need it.

Just be careful not to give too much detail - examiners don’t appear to like it when you state things that aren’t on the syllabus.


Thanks!

They also don't appear to like human error, so I know just how picky they can be. I'll bear it in mind.
Original post by Rohan007best
this is for A level, right? Thanks for your help btw. My last question just to check I remember it properly metallic bonds are between metals covalent between non-metals and ionic between metal and non-metal right in A level?

Yes, this is A level.

Generally speaking, those rules about the types of bonding you’d expect are correct, though there are exceptions (afaik, you don’t have to know any of the exceptions at A level)

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