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Hey everyone, the greek theatre exam is coming up and I'm wondering what the general public is thinking the essays could be on? Bless x

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I think it might be on oedipus but i'm not sure x
Original post by smirfy
Hey everyone, the greek theatre exam is coming up and I'm wondering what the general public is thinking the essays could be on? Bless x

Considering the fact that none of the 30 markers last year were on frogs I’m quite certain there will be at least one 30m related to frogs
Reply 3
anyone have any notes or resources they can share on the first picture question ... I always struggle with what to say on that ?
Original post by zartariooo
Considering the fact that none of the 30 markers last year were on frogs I’m quite certain there will be at least one 30m related to frogs

Hi. Do you remember what the questions were for the 2023 Greek theatre paper?
Original post by Tom2Cold
I think it might be on oedipus but i'm not sure x

Hi. Do you remember what the questions were for the 2023 Greek theatre paper? x
Original post by alwysnoakskao
Hi. Do you remember what the questions were for the 2023 Greek theatre paper?

greek theatre was, the choregos vase and how that shows comedic costumes for the 10 marker. the ten marker was odeipus and tiresais arguing, the 20 was on the theme of blindness and sight in oedipus the king and the 30 markers were: "Does the first half or second half of frogs account for the success of the play" and the other one was on the role of gods/religion in theatre. hope that helps :smile:
Reply 7
I have a feeling that the upcoming one is going to be focused on the Bacchae and how the gods are presented (maybe tragedies vs comedies), anyone got any ideas?
Any predictions for 30 markers ?
Reply 9
Original post by Krishk15
Any predictions for 30 markers ?

2021 was Bacchae and Frogs or Oedipus, 2022 was Oedipus or Bacchae, 2023 was contextual or Frogs - they've all come up consistently so it would probably be a shot in the dark but maybe contextual information like some links of the Peloponnesian War (which hasn't really come up on new spec), but more likely to do with tragedies since that wasn't the focus of last years
Original post by pdu
2021 was Bacchae and Frogs or Oedipus, 2022 was Oedipus or Bacchae, 2023 was contextual or Frogs - they've all come up consistently so it would probably be a shot in the dark but maybe contextual information like some links of the Peloponnesian War (which hasn't really come up on new spec), but more likely to do with tragedies since that wasn't the focus of last years

Isn’t that really limited talking about pelopennesian war
Reply 11
Original post by Krishk15
Isn’t that really limited talking about pelopennesian war
IDK what it could be on but its a piece of contextualised information which comes up in all of the plays:

Oedipus Tyrannus: Oedipus was an elected basileus (hence a Tyrannus), rather chosen which is similar to the Spartan oligarchy, while Creon was rightfully born a king (hence a Basileus).

Frogs: Battle of Arginusae took place, which allowed some slaves to be freed - there were constant references to Xanthius avoiding conscription and so he is treated unfairly in the Underworld, i.e. Chaeron makes him walk past the father-murderers and oath-breakers, while Dionysus rows over the Styx.

(I forgot Bacchae, but there was a link to it somewhere)

Was just a complete shot in the dark bcs the previous years 30-markers are been pretty evened out, more likely to have a question on tragedy, but like I said contextual questions haven't really come up either.
Reply 13
Original post by pdu
IDK what it could be on but its a piece of contextualised information which comes up in all of the plays:
Oedipus Tyrannus: Oedipus was an elected basileus (hence a Tyrannus), rather chosen which is similar to the Spartan oligarchy, while Creon was rightfully born a king (hence a Basileus).
Frogs: Battle of Arginusae took place, which allowed some slaves to be freed - there were constant references to Xanthius avoiding conscription and so he is treated unfairly in the Underworld, i.e. Chaeron makes him walk past the father-murderers and oath-breakers, while Dionysus rows over the Styx.
(I forgot Bacchae, but there was a link to it somewhere)
Was just a complete shot in the dark bcs the previous years 30-markers are been pretty evened out, more likely to have a question on tragedy, but like I said contextual questions haven't really come up either.

Also the plague in oedipus is a reference to the plague that happened during the war. And there are also links of Oedipus as a Pericles figure
Reply 14
Original post by Pudot
Also the plague in oedipus is a reference to the plague that happened during the war. And there are also links of Oedipus as a Pericles figure

Just curious - where does Oedipus link to Pericles? Would def be good linkage if there is a question on the war.
Reply 15
Original post by pdu
Just curious - where does Oedipus link to Pericles? Would def be good linkage if there is a question on the war.


Oedipus' speeches are similar to Pericles' in the sense of expressing desire to help but his actions are stubborn and too narrow-minded in similar fashion to how Pericles is often interpreted in the Peloponnesian War.

He wanted to hold Athens intact at any cost and leave the countryside for sparta which led to the loss of the war. He also believed the plague in Athens was a divine sign and that it wasn't something that mortals could solve. This can be seen as similar to Oedipus' own attitudes towards Thebes and the plague.

Idk which version of Oedipus u have but the Bloomsbury Students edition has a REALLY GOOD introduction that talks about it. If needed I can scan it and send.
Reply 16
Original post by pudot
Oedipus' speeches are similar to Pericles' in the sense of expressing desire to help but his actions are stubborn and too narrow-minded in similar fashion to how Pericles is often interpreted in the Peloponnesian War.
He wanted to hold Athens intact at any cost and leave the countryside for sparta which led to the loss of the war. He also believed the plague in Athens was a divine sign and that it wasn't something that mortals could solve. This can be seen as similar to Oedipus' own attitudes towards Thebes and the plague.
Idk which version of Oedipus u have but the Bloomsbury Students edition has a REALLY GOOD introduction that talks about it. If needed I can scan it and send.

Tyy! Would be useful if you could send some pictures through :smile:
(edited 3 days ago)
Reply 17
Original post by pdu
Tyy! Would be useful if you could send some pictures through :smile:


Sure thing! Do you mind if I send it tomorrow? It's easier to do it from the school's printer
Reply 18
Of course.
Original post by Pudot
Sure thing! Do you mind if I send it tomorrow? It's easier to do it from the school's printer

could you send this to me please too

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