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Going from BSc Economics and Finance at Uni of Surrey to Oxford/LSE Statistics MSc un

I'm a domestic student going into my third year at the University of Surrey and was wondering if I could take Statistics MSc at Oxford/LSE coming from an Economics and Finance background. I've done introductory and intermediate Econometrics during my second year and will take time series Econometrics and topics in applied Econometrics in my third year. My second-year grade was 75%. The reason I want to do an MSc is to have a target uni on my cv and have another shot at the recruiting cycle for internships.

My cliche goal is to get into investment banking.

The reason for choosing Statistics instead of Economics is purely financial as the Statistics course is £14,410/£16,440 while the Economics course is £55,630/£33,480 at Oxford/LSE. Should I opt to do the Economics MSc if I want to get into investment banking even with the significantly higher price? Also are there any other courses at the master's level at target unis that have a good shot at investment banking but are cheaper than the Economics course?
Original post by A571!
I'm a domestic student going into my third year at the University of Surrey and was wondering if I could take Statistics MSc at Oxford/LSE coming from an Economics and Finance background. I've done introductory and intermediate Econometrics during my second year and will take time series Econometrics and topics in applied Econometrics in my third year. My second-year grade was 75%. The reason I want to do an MSc is to have a target uni on my cv and have another shot at the recruiting cycle for internships.

My cliche goal is to get into investment banking.

The reason for choosing Statistics instead of Economics is purely financial as the Statistics course is £14,410/£16,440 while the Economics course is £55,630/£33,480 at Oxford/LSE. Should I opt to do the Economics MSc if I want to get into investment banking even with the significantly higher price? Also are there any other courses at the master's level at target unis that have a good shot at investment banking but are cheaper than the Economics course?

First of all that's not a cliche goal, just a very popular one. :wink:
Second: can I ask why the financial concern if you're a domestic student?

I'm going to move your thread into a more suitable forum now so someone with some investment banking knowledge (unlike me) can reply to you.
Reply 2
Original post by 04MR17
First of all that's not a cliche goal, just a very popular one. :wink:
Second: can I ask why the financial concern if you're a domestic student?

I'm going to move your thread into a more suitable forum now so someone with some investment banking knowledge (unlike me) can reply to you

It's just that the tuition fee for Economics MSc are significantly higher and I'm wondering if it's worth it to spend £15000-£30000 more
Original post by A571!
It's just that the tuition fee for Economics MSc are significantly higher and I'm wondering if it's worth it to spend £15000-£30000 more

So the payback system is designed so that you'll only repay debt to an extent that you can afford. Obviously if you end up in IB, you're likely to be earning a lot and so paying back a fair amount - but that should be affordable to you at that salary. So my main advice would be - disregard the financial aspect.

EDIT: see below
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by 04MR17
So the payback system is designed so that you'll only repay debt to an extent that you can afford. Obviously if you end up in IB, you're likely to be earning a lot and so paying back a fair amount - but that should be affordable to you at that salary. So my main advice would be - disregard the financial aspect.

This is not quite true. The master postgraduate loan given from SFE works in a different way to the undergraduate loan.

For maintenance and tuition fees, the maximum amount prospective students will be given is £12,167. This falls below the cost of attendance for many masters programmes. To fill the funding gap, many people take out private loans (which are repayable regardless of income level immediately out of university, use savings or work part-time.
Original post by EDUCAREERUK
This is not quite true. The master postgraduate loan given from SFE works in a different way to the undergraduate loan.

For maintenance and tuition fees, the maximum amount prospective students will be given is £12,167. This falls below the cost of attendance for many masters programmes. To fill the funding gap, many people take out private loans (which are repayable regardless of income level immediately out of university, use savings or work part-time.

I stand corrected! Thank you for the contribution. I've edited my post above. :smile:

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