Turn on thread page Beta

The 'State' and the 'government' watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Her Majesty's Government = Prime Minister, Cabinet.

    'The State' = Treasury, Home Office, DWP, MoD, Department of Health, etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathematicsKiller)
    No, the Government is only part of the state.
    The state is made up of three fundamental parts:
    The Government.
    The Legislature.
    The Executives.
    You're forgetting the general public! Someone has been on the Rousseau I am guessing?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by c0nfus3d)
    is it a unitary state?
    No, there is a federal government and only one authority in it.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    No, there is a federal government and only one authority in it.
    The UK is a unitary state; the small powers the Welsh Assembly andScottish Parliament have are delegated to them by parliament, the central government has authority over them.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Britain is a island.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Dear God. There is so much misinformation in this thread. Let me attempt to put this right.

    On your first question; is the government the state. In short, no. The Government is simply the executive of the state, the administration pulling the strings of the state. What the state is, exactly, is quite a complex topic. If this is for an essay you are working on, I suggest you do some reading on this specific subject.

    On your second question; yes, Britain is a sovereign state. That is, if by Britain you mean the United Kingdom. I can't believe this is even being disputed. It is also a unitary state.

    If you have any more questions, don't hesitate to ask. Or if you prefer, you can send me a PM.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    OP, I'm quoting the following posts below because I don't believe they are accurate. I wouldn't want you to put the wrong things in your essay (if it is an essay you are doing).

    (Original post by Aj12)
    Yeah I would say they are the same.
    They are not.

    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I think they are subtly different in as much as that the state usually refers to the entire governing body of England, while the government is something that changes every five years. The government is the controlling force of the state.
    You are getting there, but I'm drawing attention to this post because you have mistaken England for the United Kingdom.


    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    The government is the three branches (Sovereign/PM and Cabinet, Parliament, the Supreme Court), and the state is the institutions. So things like government departments, the NHS, etc.
    Parliament and the Supreme Court are not part of the government.

    (Original post by Planar)
    No. The state is everything state-provided, including things like embassies and the NHS.
    Well, I wouldn't put it like that. What the state provides are products of the state, they are not the state itself.

    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    No, it's a colony/depedent territory.
    What? No. It's not.

    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    No, there is a federal government and only one authority in it.
    The UK is not a federation.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stratos)
    Britain is a island.
    Okay, let's address the terminology:

    Great Britain is an island.

    The United Kingdom is a sovereign state consisting of the island of Great Britain and the North Eastern area of the island of Ireland known as Northern Ireland. The full title of this sovereign state is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    Britain is simply a word that is most often used as a synonym for the United Kingdom.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Teveth)
    Well, I wouldn't put it like that. What the state provides are products of the state, they are not the state itself.
    Well I would put it like that. Most importantly, how would Ed Miliband put it?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Planar)
    Well I would put it like that. Most importantly, how would Ed Miliband put it?
    I wouldn't. "The state is everything state-provided" - bit of a contradiction do you not think?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PurpleMonkeyDishwasher)
    I wouldn't. "The state is everything state-provided" - bit of a contradiction do you not think?
    I don't think so. It's the same principle as the aphorism "stupid is as stupid does".
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    OP, just use "The Separation of Powers" in your essay (The link I gave you).
    The people in this thread are just writing about what they THINK the state is, whereas I provided a decent source (the wikipedia article).
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathematicsKiller)
    OP, just use "The Separation of Powers" in your essay (The link I gave you).
    The people in this thread are just writing about what they THINK the state is, whereas I provided a decent source (the wikipedia article).
    Your first post was completely wrong though?

    Nothing needed to be said after Bobifier's post, as he gave the correct answer.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    One easy way to figure this out is think about the Queen and the PM. The Queen is the head of State, but the PM is the head of government.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PurpleMonkeyDishwasher)
    Your first post was completely wrong though?

    Nothing needed to be said after Bobifier's post, as he gave the correct answer.
    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I think they are subtly different in as much as that the state usually refers to the entire governing body of England, while the government is something that changes every five years. The government is the controlling force of the state.
    This is not completely accurate... "state usually refers to the entire governing body of England".
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathematicsKiller)
    This is not completely accurate... "state usually refers to the entire governing body of England".
    Replace England with UK and it is. The government govern the people who are in some ways governed by parliamentary decisions and both the government and the people are subject to laws of the judiciary.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PurpleMonkeyDishwasher)
    Replace England with UK and it is. The government govern the people who are in some ways governed by parliamentary decisions and both the government and the people are subject to laws of the judiciary.
    It's still missing the civil service.
    The civil service is a vital part of the state. For example, the civil service includes law enforcement, without which the state cannot function.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gladders)
    Government - the core executive that is responsible for the enforcement of decisions.

    Civil service - the implementers and enforcers of policy and providers of services (includes Armed Forces and Diplomatic Corps)

    Legislature - holds both of these to account.
    Is it not? (forgive me if it's wrong)

    Legislature- make law;they enact legislation
    Executive- implement law;they execute the law
    Judiciary- interpret law;they adjudicate on the meaning of the law.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aj12)
    Yeah I would say they are the same.
    I dunno, I'd say that the government is the party ruling the state? :dontknow:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    The UK is both sovereign and unitary.

    Sovereign = the government makes its own decisions and is also responsible for their implementation.

    Unitary = power flows downwards from the central government to its subordinate organs.
 
 
 
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.