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    i have an interview for hollister in England and i really don't know what to wear to it. Ive looked around online and people say to wear casual clothes or hollister clothes. But when you go to interviews you usually dress smart? so I'm a bit confused..please help!
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    No, not for a hollister interview you do NOT dress smart. A friend of mine actually had an interview with them, someone else I know works for them, so I can actually tell you exactly what they're looking for...

    Hair:
    Entirely natural hair. No unnatural colours. It's best if it's not obviously straightened or curly. Beach waves are good. Updos are a no no, anything that looks like you put a lot of effort into it, no.

    Make up (don't know if you're male/female so I'll include it nonetheless)
    If they cannot tell you are wearing make up then it's good. Of course, make up does generally give you a confidence boost, so my personal suggestion for this would be: a good foundation that matches your skin PERFECTLY, powder, a natural peach-toned blush, mascara and lip balm. Absolutely no coloured lipstick or eyeshadow, fake eyelashes, etc.

    Nails:
    No colours. Pale pink, peach, or a french manicure.

    Clothing:
    For girls - jeans, a tank top, a cardigan on top, and flip flops. Other options are a shirt opened with a top underneath.
    For guys - jeans, a TIGHT fitting t-shirt (yes, it has to be very, very tight). A shirt open on top or a hoody over is acceptable, flip-flops.
    Converse are acceptable for both, other shoes aren't.


    Ultimately, you are supposed to look like you "just walked off the beach". the hollister look is very layered and very casual. Going in formal clothing will show you do not understand the brand, so do NOT do that. When they say dress formal, people generally are talking about office-style jobs. In retail, you dress to reflect the company. if you don't already know about hollister... basically it's 'casual luxury'. Look at the website to see the clothes they sell and you'll quickly be able to tell what you should wear - their clothes basically all look the same.

    Of course, it's well known that Hollister hire highly based on looks, so if they've already asked you for an interview you're doing well and have a good chance. Good luck!
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    (Original post by porcalin123)
    i have an interview for hollister in England and i really don't know what to wear to it. Ive looked around online and people say to wear casual clothes or hollister clothes. But when you go to interviews you usually dress smart? so I'm a bit confused..please help!
    Demonstrate that you understand the Abercrombie & Fitch organisation and branding - and Hollister's place in that. Ask intelligent questions like "Was the cessation of Ruehl 925 an issue of branding, or pricing?". Understand the concepts and "mythology" about the brands - Hollister being about surfing, Abercrombie being some kind of American Pie/University ideal, and Gilly Hicks some BS about an English girl opening a lingerie shop in Australia.

    The "Look" policy is not as pervasive as people think it is. If you get past the "Look" filter, they'll probably give a job to the person that appears to be the most indoctrinated by the branding (in a good way -not just by turning up dressed in their clothes).

    Do not be overly modest about your looks. If you looked like a sack of spuds, they wouldn't be interviewing you, and their branding is based on that.

    Don't be a *****/knob, though. The store probably has a fair few of those, and the manager won't want any more to deal with.

    and watch this:

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    (Original post by Clip)
    Ask intelligent questions like Was the cessation of Ruehl 925 an issue of branding, or pricing?
    No offence intended towards you but I really don't think those kind of questions are something that most retail managers would be interested in coming from a sales assistant - at least from my own experience (I work part-time as a sales assistant for a high fashion retailer for a year now and have won several awards from them.) The kind of questions you're asking are great if you have a higher role within the company, but assuming that OP is going for more of a "model" as they call it in hollister, ie sales associate job, then that kind of knowledge isn't really important in terms of what their day to day job would be.

    They of course want you to demonstrate a thorough awareness of the brand, what the brand is about, how the company is set up, but if you're working as a sales associate, what is more important to the company is:

    - What is your customer service like? Can you offer an extremely high standard of good customer service? This is probably the most important thing.
    - What are your selling skills like? Can you sell additional items to customers?
    - Can you work with your co-workers, are you available, are you going to cause problems asking for days/time off, do you have an attitude.


    In terms of asking questions during the interview, I would steer cleer of asking about pay, and instead go for things more suited to say, expansion of the company, opportunities within the company in terms of different roles you might have within the store. If they ask you about what you know about the company, then THAT is when I would mention the connections with Abercrombie, and THEN mention Ruehl 925, any potential plans the company have for other brands/lines... And of course, given the company you're talking about, the CEO and his control over the company is going to come up.


    However, this was a thread simply asking for fashion advice for the interview, so I have obviously digressed. My bad!
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    (Original post by Jessticles)
    No offence intended towards you but I really don't think those kind of questions are something that most retail managers would be interested in coming from a sales assistant. I work as a sales assistant for a high fashion retailer for a year now and have won several awards from them. The kind of questions you're asking are great if you have a higher role within the company, but assuming that OP is going for more of a "model" as they call it in hollister, ie sales associate job, then that kind of knowledge isn't really important in terms of what their day to day job would be.

    They of course want you to demonstrate a thorough awareness of the brand, what the brand is about, how the company is set up, but if you're working as a sales associate, what is more important to the company is:

    - What is your customer service like? Can you offer an extremely high standard of good customer service? This is probably the most important thing.
    - What are your selling skills like? Can you sell additional items to customers?
    - Can you work with your co-workers, are you available, are you going to cause problems asking for days/time off, do you have an attitude.


    In terms of asking questions during the interview, I would steer cleer of asking about pay, and instead go for things more suited to say, expansion of the company, opportunities within the company in terms of different roles you might have within the store. If they ask you about what you know about the company, then THAT is when I would mention the connections with Abercrombie, and THEN mention Ruehl 925, any potential plans the company have for other brands/lines... And of course, given the company you're talking about, the CEO and his control over the company is going to come up.
    Can't disagree. But my point is that lots of people will do all that and show that they have "sun-kissed skin and medium sized breasts" and can operate a till. There is nothing to differentiate all the applicants as they are all good-looking and can sustain life. Might as well show that you give a crap about the brand outside of wearing it.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    Can't disagree. But my point is that lots of people will do all that and show that they have "sun-kissed skin and medium sized breasts" and can operate a till. There is nothing to differentiate all the applicants as they are all good-looking and can sustain life. Might as well show that you give a crap about the brand outside of wearing it.

    Oh, definitely! I just think THAT kind of depth of questions would make most managers eyes glaze over, to be honest. I think if I had asked my manager something along those lines (although for the company I work for obviously), she probably would have become bored - and I think perhaps not particularly cared about the answer! :lol:

    It's shocking how many people exactly do depend purely on fashion sense and physical appearance for retail though, and you DO have to know about the company, and be passionate about it. That's how they notice you.
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    (Original post by Jessticles)
    Oh, definitely! I just think THAT kind of depth of questions would make most managers eyes glaze over, to be honest. I think if I had asked my manager something along those lines (although for the company I work for obviously), she probably would have become bored - and I think perhaps not particularly cared about the answer! :lol:

    It's shocking how many people exactly do depend purely on fashion sense and physical appearance for retail though, and you DO have to know about the company, and be passionate about it. That's how they notice you.
    **Apologies to any A&F employees in advance, here**

    Well, my view would be that if you have already filtered candidates to the minimum acceptable criteria (by looks, age and various administrative things like work permits), then a retail manager would be tempted by someone who (a) doesn't appear to be a trouble-maker and (b) appears to be deeply interested in the company - because they're thinking "This one is really into the firm, she'll probably stay longer which means that's another time I won't be sitting here interviewing and then training another dumb hooker."
 
 
 
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