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    I have studied Mathematics and Statistics at The University of Edinburgh for two years now, and have an average of a 2:1. I really wasn't enjoying the course; there was not much statistics involved which is what I enjoy just a lot of theorems and pure mathematics so I took a year off and decided to apply to actuarial sciences to transfer into second year at another university.

    Just did my UCAS application and I have applied to the following (in no particular order):

    LSE
    Kingston
    Southampton
    Kent
    Manchester

    (I would have applied to CASS but A-level entry requirements are A*AA and I only have AAA)


    I know LSE is a hard one to get into, so I just wanted to ask which ones you would consider the best for an actuarial degree?

    My second choice for now would be kingston. I know it seems to have a bad reputation and it is a big step down from Edinburgh but I know people who go there and enjoy it. I have also studied at the library there whilst at home during study breaks before exam seasons in Edinburgh so I have a "feel" of what the university is like and the general atmosphere.

    This also begs the question: Does what university I graduate from really matter for employment? I am quite motivated and have work experience from an internship at Goldman Sachs (also getting more work experience soon), so would graduating with an actuarial degree from kingston instead of LSE lower my chances of being employed in the financial world?
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    I have studied Mathematics and Statistics at The University of Edinburgh for two years now, and have an average of a 2:1. I really wasn't enjoying the course; there was not much statistics involved which is what I enjoy just a lot of theorems and pure mathematics so I took a year off and decided to apply to actuarial sciences to transfer into second year at another university.

    Just did my UCAS application and I have applied to the following (in no particular order):

    LSE
    Kingston
    Southampton
    Kent
    Manchester

    (I would have applied to CASS but A-level entry requirements are A*AA and I only have AAA)


    I know LSE is a hard one to get into, so I just wanted to ask which ones you would consider the best for an actuarial degree?

    My second choice for now would be kingston. I know it seems to have a bad reputation and it is a big step down from Edinburgh but I know people who go there and enjoy it. I have also studied at the library there whilst at home during study breaks before exam seasons in Edinburgh so I have a "feel" of what the university is like and the general atmosphere.

    This also begs the question: Does what university I graduate from really matter for employment? I am quite motivated and have work experience from an internship at Goldman Sachs (also getting more work experience soon), so would graduating with an actuarial degree from kingston instead of LSE lower my chances of being employed in the financial world?
    I am not an actuary, but quite a few of my friends are. They studied Maths first, at Warwick, Nottingham and Heriot Watt. It is a competitive and lucrative career, so you should aim to go to a Russell Group university if possible. Cass is excellent as a business school, though is non-Russell Group.

    I'd stick it out at Edinburgh personally. Excellent uni, lovely city, and great career prospects afterwards. Kingston would be unthinkable as an alternative, personally.
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    Hi, thanks so much for the advice.

    So you would consider a Mathematics degree at Edinburgh more valuable than say an Actuarial Science degree at LSE?
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    Hi, thanks so much for the advice.

    So you would consider a Mathematics degree at Edinburgh more valuable than say an Actuarial Science degree at LSE?
    LSE would be better possibly, but Maths tends to be the more common route into the profession.
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    Hi, thanks so much for the advice.

    So you would consider a Mathematics degree at Edinburgh more valuable than say an Actuarial Science degree at LSE?
    I'd stick with Edinburgh personally. Thank goodness, a pleasant person on TSR for once.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    LSE > Edinburgh, any day of the weak.

    You should've applied to Cass regardless though. No point jittering about it now, if you can get into LSE, do it.

    I phoned them up and they told me that in any case I would only be able to get into first year for CASS if I did get in, but due to having already done two years of university student finance can only pay for two more years.. so I can't afford 3 years.

    At the end of the day shouldn't having done the exams to become an actuary (and also having done good work experience) be more important than where I got my degree?

    What is your opinion of Southampton, Manchester and Kent? Are their actuarial departments good? Because I have heard that LSE is obviously really good for in departments but that their actuarial science department is not as good.

    Thank you so much for your help!
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    I phoned them up and they told me that in any case I would only be able to get into first year for CASS if I did get in, but due to having already done two years of university student finance can only pay for two more years.. so I can't afford 3 years.

    At the end of the day shouldn't having done the exams to become an actuary (and also having done good work experience) be more important than where I got my degree?

    What is your opinion of Southampton, Manchester and Kent? Are their actuarial departments good? Because I have heard that LSE is obviously really good for in departments but that their actuarial science department is not as good.

    Thank you so much for your help!
    Idk, but it would be a downgrade from your current uni, imo. I'm just going off university prestige, to give you the best shot at grad recruitment. LSE have the strongest brand name.
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    I phoned them up and they told me that in any case I would only be able to get into first year for CASS if I did get in, but due to having already done two years of university student finance can only pay for two more years.. so I can't afford 3 years.

    At the end of the day shouldn't having done the exams to become an actuary (and also having done good work experience) be more important than where I got my degree?

    What is your opinion of Southampton, Manchester and Kent? Are their actuarial departments good? Because I have heard that LSE is obviously really good for in departments but that their actuarial science department is not as good.

    Thank you so much for your help!
    I'd seriously finish what you started at Edinburgh, LSE won't give you more than a 1% advantage over Edinburgh in this profession.

    That other poster seems to be a bit of a geezer type, not a businessman material at all. Not sure how credible his advice is unless he has actually worked in that field, or has close friends in it.

    According to the below discussion, most actuaries do have a Maths degree, like I pointed out from my own experiences:-

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1877870

    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    You clearly have no experience for what you're talking about.
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    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    I'd seriously finish what you started at Edinburgh, LSE won't give you more than a 1% advantage over Edinburgh in this profession.

    According to the below discussion, most actuaries do have a Maths degree, like I pointed out from my own experiences:-

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1877870
    Thanks for that link, its pretty useful.

    I realise that a Maths and Stats degree at Edinburgh is a good valuable degree to have but at the same time the thought of having to go back to that city for two more years is really depressing, I was seriously miserable there.

    If I didn't get into LSE I would probably go to Kingston. BIG step down but I was really trying to find out if their maths/finance department is any good because I know the university as a whole isn't too good.
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    Thanks for that link, its pretty useful.

    I realise that a Maths and Stats degree at Edinburgh is a good valuable degree to have but at the same time the thought of having to go back to that city for two more years is really depressing, I was seriously miserable there.

    If I didn't get into LSE I would probably go to Kingston. BIG step down but I was really trying to find out if their maths/finance department is any good because I know the university as a whole isn't too good.
    Don't drop down to Kingston, or Kent. That is far too much of a drop in standard, so much that you will probably never get an interview. You really need to be at a top 20 university, usually these are Russell Group ones.
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    (Original post by Kath134)
    I have studied Mathematics and Statistics at The University of Edinburgh for two years now, and have an average of a 2:1. I really wasn't enjoying the course; there was not much statistics involved which is what I enjoy just a lot of theorems and pure mathematics so I took a year off and decided to apply to actuarial sciences to transfer into second year at another university.

    Just did my UCAS application and I have applied to the following (in no particular order):

    LSE
    Kingston
    Southampton
    Kent
    Manchester

    (I would have applied to CASS but A-level entry requirements are A*AA and I only have AAA)


    I know LSE is a hard one to get into, so I just wanted to ask which ones you would consider the best for an actuarial degree?

    My second choice for now would be kingston. I know it seems to have a bad reputation and it is a big step down from Edinburgh but I know people who go there and enjoy it. I have also studied at the library there whilst at home during study breaks before exam seasons in Edinburgh so I have a "feel" of what the university is like and the general atmosphere.

    This also begs the question: Does what university I graduate from really matter for employment? I am quite motivated and have work experience from an internship at Goldman Sachs (also getting more work experience soon), so would graduating with an actuarial degree from kingston instead of LSE lower my chances of being employed in the financial world?
    Cass would be your best bet for actuarial science. I've done the research and hence, my statement. The course at Cass is simply brilliant for aspiring actuaries. We've got the largest number of fully qualified actuaries compared to any actuarial faculty at any university in the world. Brilliant lecturers, stalwarts in the actuarial profession. Your next best shot would be LSE. Their actuarial course is brass (heard the same from quite a few actuarial students there). But you've got LSE's rep to fall back on. And then Soton. QUB next. Kent thereafter.

    :current actuarial science student at Cass:


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    Does matter when you get to the point of applying to graduate schemes and everything, and it's always securing an entry level job that is the hardest thing to crack into the profession. I would recommend either LSE or CASS, CASS reputed business school, LSE just a top university really.

    I would suggest doing a Maths degree, Actuarial Science is "NOT" the same as maths, and maths graduates have a higher chance of passing the CT exams, compared to act. sci. students. But if you gain exemptions which i believe you will, you have no worry
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    There is a bit of a trade-off in what subject you study and at which university you decide to study at.

    You mentioned Actuarial Science so I will base my example on this course, I'm also a prospective student leaning more towards the Actuarial Science route over Mathematics.

    As far as which university you attend, as far as Actuarial Science is concerned, one of the factors really worth considering is whether the Actuarial course at that institution is accredited, ie do you get exemptions from the professional exams.
    The other aspect is to look at the educational experience. It is not particularly safe to say that being at a good reputable university necessarily implies that you will have a better educational experience or support there, so this is something to consider.
    It is also worth noting that the university rankings are mostly, but not only, based on the research strength of that institution. Perhaps this may not be important for those who do not wish to go into research themselves at that or any other reputable university. I would say the educational/teaching aspect is what most students should consider.

    I base this on two actuarial science students that I know both having gone to two different institutions studying Actuarial Science. One went to Macquire University, the other at University of Melbourne. Out of the two universities Melbourne is considered most prestigious, within Australia, over Macqurie (We have Russel Group universities here, in Australia they have a GO8 list of universities which is their Russel group equivalent, which Macqurie is not on).
    The student at Macqurie achieved all his actuarial exemptions and had a good educational experience and good tutorial attention with help when he required it, Melbourne student struggled with that aspect, his grades suffered a little, and now is struggling to get actuarial jobs unlike the other who is now working as an actuary.
    However, I'm only considering the grades achieved here, and by no means implying that that is the same for all students.

    The other factor is, whenever I've looked at graduate work places advertised online, a lot of employers look at your UCAS points and whether you have a 2:1 minimum in your degree. So here at least, there is no indication of which university type you should have attended. Some lucrative placements may state that you have to have attended a Russel Group, but not all.
    If we were to suggest that there are many graduates these days who achieve a minimum 2:1, then it is safe to say that employers place a good amount of emphasis on UCAS points for graduate entry schemes/jobs.
    Indeed, usually those who have a high UCAS score is likely to have attended a reputable university, but this may not always be the case.

    However, what I said here is not a blanket truth and does not apply to everyone in every situation which many of you have mentioned and/or inferred in previous posts.
    I would say having a a good UCAS score, and a good educational experience which in turn could lead to a good degree is really important, but then of course your career choice and personal circumstances would determine individual university choices.
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    (Original post by Blitzkrieg15)
    Don't drop down to Kingston, or Kent. That is far too much of a drop in standard, so much that you will probably never get an interview. You really need to be at a top 20 university, usually these are Russell Group ones.
    But Kent IS a top 20 university.
    I am having rather bad thoughts now. I really thought kent was like top 3 or 4 for actuarial science. I didnt want to go to london neither scotland so cass,lse and heriot watt were not for me.
    And so that leaves kent as my only choice.
    Did i do wrong for choosing kent?
 
 
 
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