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Industrial economics UoN vs economics UEA

I would have wanted to study straight econ but as I have missed the grade required I was given the choice to study industrial economics. Should I choose Industrial economics at uni of Nottingham or should I put economics at uni of east Anglia. I presume that the Uni of Nottingham is more renowned as it’s a Russel group uni.

Is a degree in industrial economics seen as a worse degree or is it still good as it’s from UoN. Also is there any large difference between economics and industrial economics?
(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by Den322221
I would have wanted to study straight econ but as I have missed the grade required I was given the choice to study industrial economics. Should I choose Industrial economics at uni of Nottingham or should I put economics at uni of east Anglia. I presume that the Uni of Nottingham is more renowned as it’s a Russel group uni.

Is a degree in industrial economics seen as a worse degree or is it still good as it’s from UoN. Also is there any large difference between economics and industrial economics?

Lots of your questions are next to impossible to answer. Should YOU choose industrial Econ at Notts over Econ at UEA, how are we meant to tell you want to do? I would recommend looking over the modules at each and then deciding.

I think your grad prospects could be slightly stronger from the Notts course, but the modules are very different (mainly that there's next to no macroeconomics as industrial Econ is more focused on microeconomics, competition/IO, managerial economics, financial economics). Also worth noting that while Nottingham's School of Economics is very highly rated, the Industrial Economics course mainly lies within the business school (where you might only doing the maths and some later optional modules with the economic department). Also that the business school is maybe 15mins walk from the rest of the campus.

So, for sure we can't tell you which to pick, but certainly research the modules. If you really liked macro or want to work as a macroeconomist later, industrial Economics probably isn't for you. If you liked microeconomics or want to work in that field then it's great. If you want to work in finance, consulting, or anything else where the course doesn't matter than just pick what you think you'll enjoy most, though yes on average Nottingham generally has better career prospects than UEA.
Reply 2
Original post by BenRyan99
Lots of your questions are next to impossible to answer. Should YOU choose industrial Econ at Notts over Econ at UEA, how are we meant to tell you want to do? I would recommend looking over the modules at each and then deciding.

I think your grad prospects could be slightly stronger from the Notts course, but the modules are very different (mainly that there's next to no macroeconomics as industrial Econ is more focused on microeconomics, competition/IO, managerial economics, financial economics). Also worth noting that while Nottingham's School of Economics is very highly rated, the Industrial Economics course mainly lies within the business school (where you might only doing the maths and some later optional modules with the economic department). Also that the business school is maybe 15mins walk from the rest of the campus.

So, for sure we can't tell you which to pick, but certainly research the modules. If you really liked macro or want to work as a macroeconomist later, industrial Economics probably isn't for you. If you liked microeconomics or want to work in that field then it's great. If you want to work in finance, consulting, or anything else where the course doesn't matter than just pick what you think you'll enjoy most, though yes on average Nottingham generally has better career prospects than UEA.

Thanks for the help. I wasn’t asking which one to pick just advice. I’ve looked over the modules before and there are a quite a lot of differences in modules.
Original post by Den322221
Thanks for the help. I wasn’t asking which one to pick just advice. I’ve looked over the modules before and there are a quite a lot of differences in modules.

I think it comes down to this, if you're indifferent between the modules, pick Nottingham - better for economics and generally has better career prospects).

If not then it's about whether you're willing to do a slightly less interesting course for a better uni and prospects. If not then pick uea
Reply 4
Original post by BenRyan99
I think it comes down to this, if you're indifferent between the modules, pick Nottingham - better for economics and generally has better career prospects).

If not then it's about whether you're willing to do a slightly less interesting course for a better uni and prospects. If not then pick uea


but is a degree in industrial economics renowned or good Or is it seen as bad because it’s a worse economics degree?
(edited 9 months ago)
Pick industrial economics at Nottingham
Reply 6
Original post by FairyPenguin
Pick industrial economics at Nottingham


I probably will. But just wondering, any particular reason why?
Original post by Den322221
I probably will. But just wondering, any particular reason why?


UoN has better reputation in high finance jobs. There are also very good finance societies there that help students find internships
Reply 8
Original post by FairyPenguin
UoN has better reputation in high finance jobs. There are also very good finance societies there that help students find internships

So a degree in industrial economics won’t have a huge impact in future jobs? Although u can get a high finance job it would also depend on the degree.
Original post by Den322221
but is a degree in industrial economics renowned or good Or is it seen as bad because it’s a worse economics degree?

I think two things are true:

1) Industrial Economics at Notts is not seen as quite as strong when compared with the other core economics degrees which are taught by the school of economics (e.g. BSc Economics, BSc Economics & International Economics, Economics & Econometrics, etc).

2) But the vast majority of high finance and consulting roles don't have any degree subject requirements. I've even worked grads from subjects like music, classics, philosophy, etc when working in investment banking. So they definitely wouldn't care about the distinction between economics and industrial economics. The only avenues that you'd probably be limiting yourself in when doing industrial Economics Vs straight economics, is just macroeconomics roles.
Reply 10
Thx for the help
Reply 11
I have the same issue. UofN with Industrial Economics or University of Surrey with Economics.

I like the UofN better but just can't get my head around not doing pure Economics as I just hadn't thought this would ever be the case.

Still think I'll be going for UofN as I really liked the place when I went to visit & when I read through the topics of Industrial Economics I like the idea of it. Just still struggling with the idea of it not being pure Economics.

What have you decided on?
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 12
What grades did you get - especially in maths a level?
Reply 13
Original post by SmilaB
I have the same issue. UofN with Industrial Economics or University of Surrey with Economics.

I like the UofN better but just can't get my head around not doing pure Economics as I just hadn't thought this would ever be the case.

Still think I'll be going for UofN as I really liked the place when I went to visit & when I read through the topics of Industrial Economics I like the idea of it. Just still struggling with the idea of it not being pure Economics.

That’s the same issue I had. I ended up not picking UofN as industrial Econ is just micro economics which will get quite boring doing similar things.
Reply 14
Original post by ajj2000
What grades did you get - especially in maths a level?


I got A-Maths, A-Economics & B - Physics
Reply 15
Original post by Den322221
That’s the same issue I had. I ended up not picking UofN as industrial Econ is just micro economics which will get quite boring doing similar things.


Did you go for the UEA?
Reply 16
Original post by SmilaB
I got A-Maths, A-Economics & B - Physics

Congratulations! I do wonder that given your concerns if you want a more traditional quantities economics degree (or maths and economics) you might consider applying next year after a year out?
Reply 17
Original post by ajj2000
Congratulations! I do wonder that given your concerns if you want a more traditional quantities economics degree (or maths and economics) you might consider applying next year after a year out?

Thank you.

I'm not that keen on a year out.

I think Industrial Economics will be fine, I always felt I enjoyed Business Studies at GCSE more than Economics at A-Level. The options on the Industrial Economics, whilst mainly micro, do seem to offer a little bit of variety away from Economics if you want it.

I just need to digest it all a little more & I wish there was more info about how other students have found the course and how they've got on afterwards.
(edited 9 months ago)

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