The Student Room Group

Business Finance and Mangement

anyone that is doing this course at the moment, would you say it is a good course to do if you want to get into the finance industry. Ans also is this degree a degree that would you would 100% guarantee a job in especially after uni.Latsly for this course, how many exmas do u get, how are the modules like and is the course that you are doing a course that you would say you enjoy.


Thank you:smile:
Original post by Beariee
anyone that is doing this course at the moment, would you say it is a good course to do if you want to get into the finance industry. Ans also is this degree a degree that would you would 100% guarantee a job in especially after uni.Latsly for this course, how many exmas do u get, how are the modules like and is the course that you are doing a course that you would say you enjoy.


Thank you:smile:

I didn't do a joint degree in management and finance, but I did the subjects in different degrees. Not sure if I am qualified to answer.

anyone that is doing this course at the moment, would you say it is a good course to do if you want to get into the finance industry.
If you're referring to roles in the UK financial industry, then this course is unnecessary. For any particular role in finance, you would need the appropriate professional qualification for that specific role. The management and finance degree as far as I know isn't one of those degrees that offer exemptions towards any particular role in finance nor offer anything more than a few exemptions for professional accounting qualifications (if any).
For example, if you want to become a stockbroker, then you would be looking at something like the Level 4 CISI Investment Advice Diploma (valid in the UK only, as far as I know). No degree would offer exemptions or be something equivalent to this, as far as I know.
If you are looking to get into a specific role, you would need to be a lot more specific about what you want before I can advise you further.

Ans also is this degree a degree that would you would 100% guarantee a job in especially after uni.
I don't think you understand how the job market works. No degree or qualification would guarantee you a job; that's not what a degree is for. A degree is there to show that you have an adequate understanding of the academic knowledge behind the subject that you studied. If a specific degree is not required for specific highly regulated job roles (e.g. medicine, architecture, vetinary science, nursing, etc.), then the degree is just a degree and not a passport to any particular job.

Latsly for this course, how many exmas do u get, how are the modules like and is the course that you are doing a course that you would say you enjoy.
Most degrees have 6 modules per year. Some have 8, and tend to be a lot more intense, even though they say there are fewer credits per module. You would need to check the course structure of the specific degree that you're looking at (very likely 6 though).

The modules would depend on the specific uni and lecturers that are teaching them. It would vary like crazy across different universities. Having said that general management modules are very descriptive and cover a lot of the same material that you would get in A Level Business Studies.
If the specific degree you are looking at doesn't require you to have done A Level Maths, then chances are the finance modules involve relatively simple maths and would look more into accounting based material i.e. arithmetric, straightforward maths. If the degree requires you to have done A Level Maths, then the material will involve more difficult maths as well as accounting based material e.g. real options (which can include calculus), some difficult economics material, bond calculations, etc.

Whether I would enjoy the subject would depend on the individual. I don't like descriptive subjects and I have a hard time giving the sort of answer the examiner is looking for, so I am rubbish at those. On the other hand, I like quantitative and analytical subjects, so finance, economics, maths, and data analysis are up my street. I don't know what your strengths, weaknesses, personality, or preferences are, so I can't comment.
Having said that, management degrees tend to be flexible with a wide range of options from the management school, so it's difficult to not be able to find anything you like. They tend to be good for people who haven't studied business before and look to be competent enough to start their own business after uni. They also tend to allow for electives from language schools as well as economics modules.

Would I do a management based degree considering what I have studied prior to the degree and knowing what I know now about the degree? Probably not, because I have covered most of the material before the degree and I don't like the way management degrees are taught. If I wanted to go into management research in academia, then I would need a degree in management. However, I could do this as an MSc instead of a bachelor's. Also, the degree means nothing in industry for job purposes i.e. it tends not to help if you want to apply for a job in management as far as I know.
Would I do a finance degree considering what I know now? Probably yes, but that's mostly because I enjoy maths and I want to study the material to understand how to approach academic research in finance. If you just want a job in the finance industry, this might not be for you.

I would recommend a management and finance degree to people who are keen to do business related research in academia after the degree or have a strong inclination to start their own business (even though you don't need a degree to start a business and you can get the same business knowledge elsewhere). Some of the material you do learn in the degree is very helpful though as you can make significant improvements in any organisation with what you know from the degree. However, you don't always get the chance, if you do at all.

If you have any specific questions regarding the degree or your chosen career, then I would need a lot more detail such as:

which specific degrees you are thinking for applying for (with links)

your rationale for the degrees i.e. what you hope to get out of them

your personality, strengths, weaknesses, interests, etc.

what specific role and career aspirations you have

Reply 2
Original post by MindMax2000
I didn't do a joint degree in management and finance, but I did the subjects in different degrees. Not sure if I am qualified to answer.

anyone that is doing this course at the moment, would you say it is a good course to do if you want to get into the finance industry.
If you're referring to roles in the UK financial industry, then this course is unnecessary. For any particular role in finance, you would need the appropriate professional qualification for that specific role. The management and finance degree as far as I know isn't one of those degrees that offer exemptions towards any particular role in finance nor offer anything more than a few exemptions for professional accounting qualifications (if any).
For example, if you want to become a stockbroker, then you would be looking at something like the Level 4 CISI Investment Advice Diploma (valid in the UK only, as far as I know). No degree would offer exemptions or be something equivalent to this, as far as I know.
If you are looking to get into a specific role, you would need to be a lot more specific about what you want before I can advise you further.

Ans also is this degree a degree that would you would 100% guarantee a job in especially after uni.
I don't think you understand how the job market works. No degree or qualification would guarantee you a job; that's not what a degree is for. A degree is there to show that you have an adequate understanding of the academic knowledge behind the subject that you studied. If a specific degree is not required for specific highly regulated job roles (e.g. medicine, architecture, vetinary science, nursing, etc.), then the degree is just a degree and not a passport to any particular job.

Latsly for this course, how many exmas do u get, how are the modules like and is the course that you are doing a course that you would say you enjoy.
Most degrees have 6 modules per year. Some have 8, and tend to be a lot more intense, even though they say there are fewer credits per module. You would need to check the course structure of the specific degree that you're looking at (very likely 6 though).

The modules would depend on the specific uni and lecturers that are teaching them. It would vary like crazy across different universities. Having said that general management modules are very descriptive and cover a lot of the same material that you would get in A Level Business Studies.
If the specific degree you are looking at doesn't require you to have done A Level Maths, then chances are the finance modules involve relatively simple maths and would look more into accounting based material i.e. arithmetric, straightforward maths. If the degree requires you to have done A Level Maths, then the material will involve more difficult maths as well as accounting based material e.g. real options (which can include calculus), some difficult economics material, bond calculations, etc.

Whether I would enjoy the subject would depend on the individual. I don't like descriptive subjects and I have a hard time giving the sort of answer the examiner is looking for, so I am rubbish at those. On the other hand, I like quantitative and analytical subjects, so finance, economics, maths, and data analysis are up my street. I don't know what your strengths, weaknesses, personality, or preferences are, so I can't comment.
Having said that, management degrees tend to be flexible with a wide range of options from the management school, so it's difficult to not be able to find anything you like. They tend to be good for people who haven't studied business before and look to be competent enough to start their own business after uni. They also tend to allow for electives from language schools as well as economics modules.

Would I do a management based degree considering what I have studied prior to the degree and knowing what I know now about the degree? Probably not, because I have covered most of the material before the degree and I don't like the way management degrees are taught. If I wanted to go into management research in academia, then I would need a degree in management. However, I could do this as an MSc instead of a bachelor's. Also, the degree means nothing in industry for job purposes i.e. it tends not to help if you want to apply for a job in management as far as I know.
Would I do a finance degree considering what I know now? Probably yes, but that's mostly because I enjoy maths and I want to study the material to understand how to approach academic research in finance. If you just want a job in the finance industry, this might not be for you.

I would recommend a management and finance degree to people who are keen to do business related research in academia after the degree or have a strong inclination to start their own business (even though you don't need a degree to start a business and you can get the same business knowledge elsewhere). Some of the material you do learn in the degree is very helpful though as you can make significant improvements in any organisation with what you know from the degree. However, you don't always get the chance, if you do at all.

If you have any specific questions regarding the degree or your chosen career, then I would need a lot more detail such as:

which specific degrees you are thinking for applying for (with links)

your rationale for the degrees i.e. what you hope to get out of them

your personality, strengths, weaknesses, interests, etc.

what specific role and career aspirations you have


Thank you for answering!

which specific degrees you are thinking for applying for (with links)

The Degree that i am thinking of applying to is Accounting and finance or Investment and finance. The uni's that i am thinking of applying to is UAE, university of Kent and Angilia Ruskin university

your rationale for the degrees i.e. what you hope to get out of them/ what specific role and career aspirations you have

I hope with the degree that i would do, will get me into the finance industry , i am not sure at the moment what careers i want to get into, but i do know that i want to get into the finance industry. some carers that i looked at and they are from the finance industry are bookkeeping and data analyst, and i really like the task and activities that you have to do in these roles. Also the kind of job that i want to do is a job that looks into cash flows, breakeven, statement of comprehensive income and etc.
Original post by Beariee
Thank you for answering!

which specific degrees you are thinking for applying for (with links)

The Degree that i am thinking of applying to is Accounting and finance or Investment and finance. The uni's that i am thinking of applying to is UAE, university of Kent and Angilia Ruskin university

your rationale for the degrees i.e. what you hope to get out of them/ what specific role and career aspirations you have

I hope with the degree that i would do, will get me into the finance industry , i am not sure at the moment what careers i want to get into, but i do know that i want to get into the finance industry. some carers that i looked at and they are from the finance industry are bookkeeping and data analyst, and i really like the task and activities that you have to do in these roles. Also the kind of job that i want to do is a job that looks into cash flows, breakeven, statement of comprehensive income and etc.

I don't understand what were your questions. If you have specific questions that you want me to answer, then I would be happy to add my input.

Accounting and finance or Investment and finance. The uni's that i am thinking of applying to is UAE, university of Kent and Angilia Ruskin university
The links for the degrees are:
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/3732/finance-and-investment
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/235/accounting-and-finance
https://www.aru.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/accounting-and-finance

There are no investment degrees or single honours in finance at ARU. See: https://www.aru.ac.uk/business-and-law/economics-finance-and-law/courses?levelofstudy=undergraduategl=11uxpstpgaNjA3OTM2ODk4LjE2ODcyODM2MjU.gaB2YCT90PQ8MTcwMTAwOTIzOS4xNS4xLjE3MDEwMDkzNDAuNjAuMC4w

Also UAE has multiple universities, with a number of them offering finance degrees. You would need to be more specific about the degrees and universities that you want to apply to.

Things worthy of note:

A standard UK accounting degree would usually allow you to get exemptions in ACA, ACCA, CIPFA, and CIMA. Most of these degrees tend not to have any significantly difficult maths so they tend to accept people with 3 A Levels in any subject.

What I find particularly interesting is that the degrees from Kent tend to cover A Level maths material in their first year, which can be somewhat difficult if you haven't done A Level Maths

Kent's accounting degree also allows you to do CPA Australia i.e. it means that you can get the equivalent of Australia's version of ACA and work in Australia should you wish (but that's somewhat covered with ACCA).

Kent's Finance and Investment degree interestingly has association with the CFA. I am not entirely sure whether this means that the material is accredited with the CFA Society or whether it offers you exemptions towards the CFA qualification (no mention of this on the page), so you would need to contact them to check. Having said that, the CFA qualification is often something you do after a degree, not during your degree; and the pass mark is 70%, so it's not something particularly easy to get. In other words, I think it is more likely the material is accredited by the CFA i.e. you would be learning stuff from the CFA qualification but you won't get any exemptions for it.


I hope with the degree that i would do, will get me into the finance industry , i am not sure at the moment what careers i want to get into, but i do know that i want to get into the finance industry.
Again, most degrees won't get you into the finance industry, even if the degree is in finance. What you often need to do is to do a professional finance qualification that's suitable for the specific role that you want to apply for. A single degree won't let you go into a myriad of roles within the financial industry i.e. it's not engineering or teaching. For a list of qualifications of what you actually need to get into each specific role, refer to the following specifically for the UK:
https://www.handbook.fca.org.uk/handbook/TC/App/4/1.html
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/business-and-finance
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profiles
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/browse-sector/accountancy-banking-and-finance

I am not familiar with UAE's job profiles and regulations for working in their finance sector, but the regulations tend to vary from country to country, so you would need to look into the regulations for each individual country to check e.g. just because you're a qualified accountant in the UK, it doesn't mean you would be in the US; likewise, you can be a qualified financial planner in the UK, but you won't be able to practice in Australia - the regulations and requirements are different.
From what I have read though, you can apparently go into accounting with just an accounting degree in the UAE (you might want to check this), and you don't even need the full accounting qualification. Having said that, a full on accounting qualification recognised in the country e.g. ACCA or CIMA, tends to put you in better stead than just a degree I think.

some carers that i looked at and they are from the finance industry are bookkeeping and data analyst, and i really like the task and activities that you have to do in these roles
This got me confused. Neither of these careers specifically involve finance in particular.
Bookkeeping is more accounting than anything, and you don't need a degree to do this e.g. AAT Level 3 or 4 is usually adequate (it's not a job where you need extensive accounting knowledge). Check the job profiles in the above links for the UK. More often than not, you might be able to get away with going into bookkeeping without any qualifications.
Data analyst isn't specifically finance either. It's a lot of number crunching and uses programming to do it. You don't specifically need a degree or any extensive qualifications, but usually the nonacademic courses tend to help. See:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst-statistician
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profile/data-analyst-statistician

Also the kind of job that i want to do is a job that looks into cash flows, breakeven, statement of comprehensive income and etc.
This is also where I get confused.
If you wanted to go into bookkeeping or data analysis, then you won't be looking into the above per se. Those who look into the above tend to be:

Financial analysts

Investment analysts

Accountants (financial and management)

Business consultants (possibly)

Business analysts

Director (who usually just reads the summary and not look too deep into the technicals)

If you want a job where you crunch a lot of data using IT and look into the financials, then consider business analysis. If you specifically want to look into investment, tend you're leaning more towards investment analysis and fund management.
Accounting would be the field that has the most in common with bookkeeping, data analysis (because some Big 4 firms do data analysis on top of their accounting services) and actually look into the above. If you want something that leans more on accounting whilst analysis data, then consider financial analysis and management accounting (ideally doing the CIMA qualification, but ACA tend to be OK).

As I am a bit lost to what you actually want, I would leave it to you to read through the job profiles yourself (ideally with a lot more care) before deciding on what you want to do.
Just out of interest, are you doing A Level Maths? If so, what do you think of it?
Reply 4
Original post by MindMax2000
I don't understand what were your questions. If you have specific questions that you want me to answer, then I would be happy to add my input.

Accounting and finance or Investment and finance. The uni's that i am thinking of applying to is UAE, university of Kent and Angilia Ruskin university
The links for the degrees are:
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/3732/finance-and-investment
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/235/accounting-and-finance
https://www.aru.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/accounting-and-finance

There are no investment degrees or single honours in finance at ARU. See: https://www.aru.ac.uk/business-and-law/economics-finance-and-law/courses?levelofstudy=undergraduategl=11uxpstpgaNjA3OTM2ODk4LjE2ODcyODM2MjU.gaB2YCT90PQ8MTcwMTAwOTIzOS4xNS4xLjE3MDEwMDkzNDAuNjAuMC4w

Also UAE has multiple universities, with a number of them offering finance degrees. You would need to be more specific about the degrees and universities that you want to apply to.

Things worthy of note:

A standard UK accounting degree would usually allow you to get exemptions in ACA, ACCA, CIPFA, and CIMA. Most of these degrees tend not to have any significantly difficult maths so they tend to accept people with 3 A Levels in any subject.

What I find particularly interesting is that the degrees from Kent tend to cover A Level maths material in their first year, which can be somewhat difficult if you haven't done A Level Maths

Kent's accounting degree also allows you to do CPA Australia i.e. it means that you can get the equivalent of Australia's version of ACA and work in Australia should you wish (but that's somewhat covered with ACCA).

Kent's Finance and Investment degree interestingly has association with the CFA. I am not entirely sure whether this means that the material is accredited with the CFA Society or whether it offers you exemptions towards the CFA qualification (no mention of this on the page), so you would need to contact them to check. Having said that, the CFA qualification is often something you do after a degree, not during your degree; and the pass mark is 70%, so it's not something particularly easy to get. In other words, I think it is more likely the material is accredited by the CFA i.e. you would be learning stuff from the CFA qualification but you won't get any exemptions for it.


I hope with the degree that i would do, will get me into the finance industry , i am not sure at the moment what careers i want to get into, but i do know that i want to get into the finance industry.
Again, most degrees won't get you into the finance industry, even if the degree is in finance. What you often need to do is to do a professional finance qualification that's suitable for the specific role that you want to apply for. A single degree won't let you go into a myriad of roles within the financial industry i.e. it's not engineering or teaching. For a list of qualifications of what you actually need to get into each specific role, refer to the following specifically for the UK:
https://www.handbook.fca.org.uk/handbook/TC/App/4/1.html
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/business-and-finance
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profiles
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/browse-sector/accountancy-banking-and-finance

I am not familiar with UAE's job profiles and regulations for working in their finance sector, but the regulations tend to vary from country to country, so you would need to look into the regulations for each individual country to check e.g. just because you're a qualified accountant in the UK, it doesn't mean you would be in the US; likewise, you can be a qualified financial planner in the UK, but you won't be able to practice in Australia - the regulations and requirements are different.
From what I have read though, you can apparently go into accounting with just an accounting degree in the UAE (you might want to check this), and you don't even need the full accounting qualification. Having said that, a full on accounting qualification recognised in the country e.g. ACCA or CIMA, tends to put you in better stead than just a degree I think.

some carers that i looked at and they are from the finance industry are bookkeeping and data analyst, and i really like the task and activities that you have to do in these roles
This got me confused. Neither of these careers specifically involve finance in particular.
Bookkeeping is more accounting than anything, and you don't need a degree to do this e.g. AAT Level 3 or 4 is usually adequate (it's not a job where you need extensive accounting knowledge). Check the job profiles in the above links for the UK. More often than not, you might be able to get away with going into bookkeeping without any qualifications.
Data analyst isn't specifically finance either. It's a lot of number crunching and uses programming to do it. You don't specifically need a degree or any extensive qualifications, but usually the nonacademic courses tend to help. See:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst-statistician
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profile/data-analyst-statistician

Also the kind of job that i want to do is a job that looks into cash flows, breakeven, statement of comprehensive income and etc.
This is also where I get confused.
If you wanted to go into bookkeeping or data analysis, then you won't be looking into the above per se. Those who look into the above tend to be:

Financial analysts

Investment analysts

Accountants (financial and management)

Business consultants (possibly)

Business analysts

Director (who usually just reads the summary and not look too deep into the technicals)

If you want a job where you crunch a lot of data using IT and look into the financials, then consider business analysis. If you specifically want to look into investment, tend you're leaning more towards investment analysis and fund management.
Accounting would be the field that has the most in common with bookkeeping, data analysis (because some Big 4 firms do data analysis on top of their accounting services) and actually look into the above. If you want something that leans more on accounting whilst analysis data, then consider financial analysis and management accounting (ideally doing the CIMA qualification, but ACA tend to be OK).

As I am a bit lost to what you actually want, I would leave it to you to read through the job profiles yourself (ideally with a lot more care) before deciding on what you want to do.
Just out of interest, are you doing A Level Maths? If so, what do you think of it?

I am going to carefully read all of this and get back to you but at the moment i am not doing a level math. I am doing a BTEC Level 3 business course.

AND i think i made a mistake with one of the university that i metioned when i said (UAE ) i actually meant UEA( university of east angilia)

Also, is ok , if u tell me the university degree that you have done and what job are you are currently doing.
Reply 5
Original post by MindMax2000
I don't understand what were your questions. If you have specific questions that you want me to answer, then I would be happy to add my input.

Accounting and finance or Investment and finance. The uni's that i am thinking of applying to is UAE, university of Kent and Angilia Ruskin university
The links for the degrees are:
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/3732/finance-and-investment
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/235/accounting-and-finance
https://www.aru.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/accounting-and-finance

There are no investment degrees or single honours in finance at ARU. See: https://www.aru.ac.uk/business-and-law/economics-finance-and-law/courses?levelofstudy=undergraduategl=11uxpstpgaNjA3OTM2ODk4LjE2ODcyODM2MjU.gaB2YCT90PQ8MTcwMTAwOTIzOS4xNS4xLjE3MDEwMDkzNDAuNjAuMC4w

Also UAE has multiple universities, with a number of them offering finance degrees. You would need to be more specific about the degrees and universities that you want to apply to.

Things worthy of note:

A standard UK accounting degree would usually allow you to get exemptions in ACA, ACCA, CIPFA, and CIMA. Most of these degrees tend not to have any significantly difficult maths so they tend to accept people with 3 A Levels in any subject.

What I find particularly interesting is that the degrees from Kent tend to cover A Level maths material in their first year, which can be somewhat difficult if you haven't done A Level Maths

Kent's accounting degree also allows you to do CPA Australia i.e. it means that you can get the equivalent of Australia's version of ACA and work in Australia should you wish (but that's somewhat covered with ACCA).

Kent's Finance and Investment degree interestingly has association with the CFA. I am not entirely sure whether this means that the material is accredited with the CFA Society or whether it offers you exemptions towards the CFA qualification (no mention of this on the page), so you would need to contact them to check. Having said that, the CFA qualification is often something you do after a degree, not during your degree; and the pass mark is 70%, so it's not something particularly easy to get. In other words, I think it is more likely the material is accredited by the CFA i.e. you would be learning stuff from the CFA qualification but you won't get any exemptions for it.


I hope with the degree that i would do, will get me into the finance industry , i am not sure at the moment what careers i want to get into, but i do know that i want to get into the finance industry.
Again, most degrees won't get you into the finance industry, even if the degree is in finance. What you often need to do is to do a professional finance qualification that's suitable for the specific role that you want to apply for. A single degree won't let you go into a myriad of roles within the financial industry i.e. it's not engineering or teaching. For a list of qualifications of what you actually need to get into each specific role, refer to the following specifically for the UK:
https://www.handbook.fca.org.uk/handbook/TC/App/4/1.html
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/business-and-finance
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profiles
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/browse-sector/accountancy-banking-and-finance

I am not familiar with UAE's job profiles and regulations for working in their finance sector, but the regulations tend to vary from country to country, so you would need to look into the regulations for each individual country to check e.g. just because you're a qualified accountant in the UK, it doesn't mean you would be in the US; likewise, you can be a qualified financial planner in the UK, but you won't be able to practice in Australia - the regulations and requirements are different.
From what I have read though, you can apparently go into accounting with just an accounting degree in the UAE (you might want to check this), and you don't even need the full accounting qualification. Having said that, a full on accounting qualification recognised in the country e.g. ACCA or CIMA, tends to put you in better stead than just a degree I think.

some carers that i looked at and they are from the finance industry are bookkeeping and data analyst, and i really like the task and activities that you have to do in these roles
This got me confused. Neither of these careers specifically involve finance in particular.
Bookkeeping is more accounting than anything, and you don't need a degree to do this e.g. AAT Level 3 or 4 is usually adequate (it's not a job where you need extensive accounting knowledge). Check the job profiles in the above links for the UK. More often than not, you might be able to get away with going into bookkeeping without any qualifications.
Data analyst isn't specifically finance either. It's a lot of number crunching and uses programming to do it. You don't specifically need a degree or any extensive qualifications, but usually the nonacademic courses tend to help. See:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst-statistician
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/data-analyst
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/finance-accounting/job-profile/data-analyst-statistician

Also the kind of job that i want to do is a job that looks into cash flows, breakeven, statement of comprehensive income and etc.
This is also where I get confused.
If you wanted to go into bookkeeping or data analysis, then you won't be looking into the above per se. Those who look into the above tend to be:

Financial analysts

Investment analysts

Accountants (financial and management)

Business consultants (possibly)

Business analysts

Director (who usually just reads the summary and not look too deep into the technicals)

If you want a job where you crunch a lot of data using IT and look into the financials, then consider business analysis. If you specifically want to look into investment, tend you're leaning more towards investment analysis and fund management.
Accounting would be the field that has the most in common with bookkeeping, data analysis (because some Big 4 firms do data analysis on top of their accounting services) and actually look into the above. If you want something that leans more on accounting whilst analysis data, then consider financial analysis and management accounting (ideally doing the CIMA qualification, but ACA tend to be OK).

As I am a bit lost to what you actually want, I would leave it to you to read through the job profiles yourself (ideally with a lot more care) before deciding on what you want to do.
Just out of interest, are you doing A Level Maths? If so, what do you think of it?

Thank you, i will read all of this carefully and research then it i will get back to you, but btw i am not doing a level math but i doing BTEC (LEVEL 3 BUSINESS)

and i think i must have typed down the wrong university you know when i mentioned UAE i actually ,meant UEA (University of east Angelia).
Reply 6
Original post by Beariee
anyone that is doing this course at the moment, would you say it is a good course to do if you want to get into the finance industry. Ans also is this degree a degree that would you would 100% guarantee a job in especially after uni.Latsly for this course, how many exmas do u get, how are the modules like and is the course that you are doing a course that you would say you enjoy.


Thank you:smile:

Hi Beariee!

[start]I'm currently enrolled in the business management course at Anglia Ruskin, and I can share my perspective on the course. While I can't speak directly about the specific course you mentioned, I can highlight my experience with business management.[/start]

[start]Firstly, business management at Anglia Ruskin has been a rewarding journey for me. Unlike some courses, we don't have traditional exams; instead, our assessments are centered around coursework and live brief tasks. This approach has allowed me to develop practical skills and apply theoretical knowledge in real-world scenarios.[/start]

[start]In terms of career prospects, business management offers a wide range of options, and the employability team at Anglia Ruskin is highly supportive in helping secure post-graduation opportunities. The degree equips you with a versatile skill set applicable to various industries, including finance.[/start]

[start]Regarding your specific query about the finance industry, I've found that our course includes modules directly related to finance. These modules provide a solid foundation for understanding financial concepts and practices, which could be valuable if you're aiming for a career in finance.[/start]

[start]While I can't guarantee a job post-graduation, the skills and knowledge gained through the business management course have certainly enhanced my employability. The course structure, with its focus on practical tasks and relevant modules, has contributed to a well-rounded learning experience for me.[/start]

[start]Ultimately, whether you enjoy the course depends on your personal interests and learning preferences. I've personally found the modules engaging, and the absence of traditional exams has allowed me to explore and understand the subject matter more thoroughly.[/start]

[start]I hope this gives you some insight into the business management program at Anglia Ruskin. If you have any more specific questions, feel free to ask![/start]
Original post by Beariee
Thank you, i will read all of this carefully and research then it i will get back to you, but btw i am not doing a level math but i doing BTEC (LEVEL 3 BUSINESS)

and i think i must have typed down the wrong university you know when i mentioned UAE i actually ,meant UEA (University of east Angelia).

i am not doing a level math but i doing BTEC (LEVEL 3 BUSINESS)
Then I would check the entry requirements for each of the degrees that you want to do. If you're doing BTEC, they might ask for an extended diploma as opposed to a certificate or a standard diploma.
UEA doesn't accept BTEC in business administration for their accounting and finance degree, for example. If this applies to you, then you would need alternative qualifications to do the degree. If it doesn't, then it goes in your shortlist.

i actually ,meant UEA (University of east Angelia).
The same advice from my previous post apply.
The following link is the link to UEA's accounting and finance degree:
https://www.uea.ac.uk/course/undergraduate/bsc-accounting-and-finance#course_overview

I can't see a degree for investment and finance, but UEA alternatively has management and finance, economics and finance, and businesss finance and economics:
https://www.uea.ac.uk/about/norwich-business-school/study-with-us/undergraduate
https://www.uea.ac.uk/web/about/school-of-economics/undergraduate

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