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Economics degree without Economics or Further Maths A-levels?

Hi everyone!
For some context, I have been predicted 3A* in maths, chemistry and history and achieved 11 9s at GCSE. Up until this point I had been considering a chemistry degree as from what people had always said, further maths was like a “soft requirement” to do economics degrees at the top unis (I think I would prefer an economics degree to chemistry, despite enjoying both). However, I’ve recently spoken to someone who said that this mainly applies to oxbridge, lse and maybe the new imperial course? Can anyone give any advice related to this or comment from experience?

I also was wondering, how feasible would it be to apply for something like economics and history at lse and economics elsewhere, especially in terms of personal statement?

Many thanks!
Reply 1
Bath - one of the top Econ courses - does not require Econ or FM.
Ditto for Bristol and many other good Unis.
Original post by Flash08
Hi everyone!
For some context, I have been predicted 3A* in maths, chemistry and history and achieved 11 9s at GCSE. Up until this point I had been considering a chemistry degree as from what people had always said, further maths was like a “soft requirement” to do economics degrees at the top unis (I think I would prefer an economics degree to chemistry, despite enjoying both). However, I’ve recently spoken to someone who said that this mainly applies to oxbridge, lse and maybe the new imperial course? Can anyone give any advice related to this or comment from experience?

I also was wondering, how feasible would it be to apply for something like economics and history at lse and economics elsewhere, especially in terms of personal statement?

Many thanks!

Economics at A-level isn't required by any economics degree I'm aware of.

A-level Further Maths is expected by LSE if your school offers it for single subject economics. At Cambridge for economics I believe a large proprotion of successful applicants do take FM, although I don't know if this is a result of self selection. Land economy is pretty mixed between the two so I don't think there's a particular preference for FM for land economy at Cambridge though. Likewise for E&M at Oxford which has a high proportion of successful applicants doing FM).- PPE and history and economics at Oxford on the other hand seem to take FM vs no-FM at similar levels.

Warwick state they do not prefer FM at A-level for admissions purposes. UCL I believe probably is likely to favour FM although this is just based on the popularity of the course and that it's reasonably mathematical - I haven't actually looked at any data specifically so if you find a FOIA request showing to the contrary that would be illuminating.

For LSE joint honours courses in non-mathematical subjects (e.g. economics and politics, economics and economic history) I believe FM is less of a preference.
Original post by Flash08
Hi everyone!
For some context, I have been predicted 3A* in maths, chemistry and history and achieved 11 9s at GCSE. Up until this point I had been considering a chemistry degree as from what people had always said, further maths was like a “soft requirement” to do economics degrees at the top unis (I think I would prefer an economics degree to chemistry, despite enjoying both). However, I’ve recently spoken to someone who said that this mainly applies to oxbridge, lse and maybe the new imperial course? Can anyone give any advice related to this or comment from experience?

I also was wondering, how feasible would it be to apply for something like economics and history at lse and economics elsewhere, especially in terms of personal statement?

Many thanks!


Most universities outside of Oxbridge and London will accept you with your subjects for Economics.
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
Economics at A-level isn't required by any economics degree I'm aware of.

A-level Further Maths is expected by LSE if your school offers it for single subject economics. At Cambridge for economics I believe a large proprotion of successful applicants do take FM, although I don't know if this is a result of self selection. Land economy is pretty mixed between the two so I don't think there's a particular preference for FM for land economy at Cambridge though. Likewise for E&M at Oxford which has a high proportion of successful applicants doing FM).- PPE and history and economics at Oxford on the other hand seem to take FM vs no-FM at similar levels.

Warwick state they do not prefer FM at A-level for admissions purposes. UCL I believe probably is likely to favour FM although this is just based on the popularity of the course and that it's reasonably mathematical - I haven't actually looked at any data specifically so if you find a FOIA request showing to the contrary that would be illuminating.

For LSE joint honours courses in non-mathematical subjects (e.g. economics and politics, economics and economic history) I believe FM is less of a preference.

Thanks everyone for the replies. I believe I did see a FOIA request for UCL, though for 2016, 2017, 2018 so things might have changed; if I remember roughly 40ish% of those received offers had fm, and the other 60ish% didn’t, for straight economics. However, I’m not sure how accurate these figures are today, otherwise it seems it doesn’t seem to advantage you much in terms of application.

Also, is it possible to write a personal statement for something like economics and economic history at lse or land economy and Cambridge but then still apply to economics elsewhere or given the competitive nature of the course, would that not be possible (I.e. they are looking for tailored personal statements).

Thanks again.
Original post by Flash08
Thanks everyone for the replies. I believe I did see a FOIA request for UCL, though for 2016, 2017, 2018 so things might have changed; if I remember roughly 40ish% of those received offers had fm, and the other 60ish% didn’t, for straight economics. However, I’m not sure how accurate these figures are today, otherwise it seems it doesn’t seem to advantage you much in terms of application.

Also, is it possible to write a personal statement for something like economics and economic history at lse or land economy and Cambridge but then still apply to economics elsewhere or given the competitive nature of the course, would that not be possible (I.e. they are looking for tailored personal statements).

Thanks again.

With Cambridge land economy they usually expect personal statements will be for other subjects as that course is unique to Cambridge, and the Cambridge SAQ has an optional additional personal statement section that you can use to discuss the course there specifically which is just for Cambridge to see :smile:

In terms of economics and economic history at LSE, LSE is well known to be extremely focused on personal statements and usually looks for strong engagement with both sides of joint honours degrees. Therefore if applying to LSE it's worth tailoring your PS to them.

Whether that could be an issue elsewhere for single honours economics degrees I'm not sure, depends on what you wrote about perhaps. Might be easier if you were applying to e.g. economics and economic history at LSE and history and economics at Oxford (as that course at Oxford is effectively a tripartite degree in history, economics, and economic history anyway), and then either single honours economics elsewhere at less competitive unis, or other joint honours economics and history degrees.

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