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    (Original post by sara :D)
    Anyone got any tips for the theme of love with WOB/The Rivals? I seem to have loads of notes on obscure topics like sexuality and desire, but barely anything on love, because well the love isn't exactly always genuine D: I mean there's the Wife and Jankyn, Faukland + Julia (questionable) and Lydia and Absolute (also very questionable). So what could they actually ask about love?
    If they do ask about love, I would just argue against it because I personally don't think love is a big part of either text - even when parts of it seem to be about love, it's not 'proper' love. However, it's English lit so you can argue it either way xD.

    For WoB, I'd say Alisoun wants power in marriage (made clear at many intervals) and the one time she does somewhat love her husband (Jankyn), it doesn't work out - there's abuse, misogyny etc. Same with the Tale - it's more about power.

    In The Rivals, considering it is a comedy of manners/sentimental comedy, the focus is more on the humourous side of 'love'. Faulkland's indecisiveness is for comedic purposes. Lydia's view of love/marriage is formed entirely by the sentimental novels she reads and therefore it is not really what she wants - it is what she thinks she wants.

    That's the general gist concerning what I would say and, especially given the marriage customs at the time (in both texts), marriage was more for financial and practical reasons than love ones. Hope that helped
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    (Original post by lauralexandra)
    ah thank you so much this is seriously helpful -my teacher hasn't given much a04 for the wob! Yeah I think I'm using those kind of quotes and the pardoners interruption, and reference to the role of the knight in the tale.I'm hoping the wob/rivals questions include something to do with either marriage or women!
    good luck though it sounds like you've got it covered
    You're welcome, glad it helped
    Yes, marriage/women would be the ideal topics! There's so much to write about both in the texts and contextual stuff, and feminist/Marxist readings. Ha, I hope so - I better not stall in the exam
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    (Original post by Pavzky)
    If they do ask about love, I would just argue against it because I personally don't think love is a big part of either text - even when parts of it seem to be about love, it's not 'proper' love. However, it's English lit so you can argue it either way xD.

    For WoB, I'd say Alisoun wants power in marriage (made clear at many intervals) and the one time she does somewhat love her husband (Jankyn), it doesn't work out - there's abuse, misogyny etc. Same with the Tale - it's more about power.

    In The Rivals, considering it is a comedy of manners/sentimental comedy, the focus is more on the humourous side of 'love'. Faulkland's indecisiveness is for comedic purposes. Lydia's view of love/marriage is formed entirely by the sentimental novels she reads and therefore it is not really what she wants - it is what she thinks she wants.

    That's the general gist concerning what I would say and, especially given the marriage customs at the time (in both texts), marriage was more for financial and practical reasons than love ones. Hope that helped
    Yeh I completely agree, all my points on love are just the counter argument, so it would be alright to just argue against it? (Of course making a small argument for it at the beginning of each paragraph, but then proceeding to beat it down in the remainder?) Thanks for the help
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    I am taking today and tomorrow off to revise for English properly and get into the habit of doing timed essays.
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    (Original post by sara :D)
    Yeh I completely agree, all my points on love are just the counter argument, so it would be alright to just argue against it? (Of course making a small argument for it at the beginning of each paragraph, but then proceeding to beat it down in the remainder?) Thanks for the help
    Yeah that'd be fine xD. I always prefer arguing against the question because it makes you argument stand out - if you comply with the question then it just looks like an easy way out, imo. Haha yessssssss all the way! You're welcome
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    (Original post by Pavzky)
    Yeah that'd be fine xD. I always prefer arguing against the question because it makes you argument stand out - if you comply with the question then it just looks like an easy way out, imo. Haha yessssssss all the way! You're welcome
    Awesome, yeh I prefer always arguing against the assertion too How's revision going? I've kind of written all my notes so I'm just in the process of getting all quotes and points into my head!
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    (Original post by sara :D)
    Awesome, yeh I prefer always arguing against the assertion too How's revision going? I've kind of written all my notes so I'm just in the process of getting all quotes and points into my head!
    It's going alright - I've typed quotes for both texts and just realised I've not done anything for King Lear yet o.O. But yeah I'm basically just gonna cram English from tomorrow - I think I know the themes, context and majority of quotes off the top of my head for section B. I just really need to focus on King Lear now - I've half forgotten/neglected it
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    (Original post by simstaaar)
    To be quite honest I'm dreading it 8) nothing's sticking in my mind and I just find it so boring! There's such a broad range of things we could be questioned on
    on all in all I'm a bit scared haha

    what about you?
    Haha same! I reckon it will be love, setting/conflict or communication. :-P It covers SO many themes! I think ultimately we're quite lucky because it's so broad since then we can apply so much to a more narrow question and we can probably twist the question too.

    (Original post by pjb95)
    Ah yes! What poems would you use for death? X


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    'The Chimney Sweeper' (Innocence) because of the persona's mother dying and his dad selling him (loss), also the idea of life after death is explored with regard to the 'if all do their duty, the need not fear harm' and suffering in life to approacha happy after-life; it's a new beginning and held a lot of value in the immaterial world.
    'The Little Black Boy' - again an idea of a positive after-life (whereas Webster presents death as inevitable and hellish) the 'golden tent' and God. TLBB must suffer to have a good after-life too 'bear the beams of love'.
    'The Fly' - a 'thoughtless hand' kills the fly; presents an idea of vulnerability surrounding life and death, blurs the line between the two.
    'London' - links to the Plagues and the fact that the monarchy and society see death as flippant 'the hapless Soldiers sigh / Runs in blood down Palace walls' (the Soldier's protests cannot be heard; they feel their fighting is pointless - 'sigh' - and multiple die due to plural), 'blights the plagues the Marriage hearse' - oxymoron, yay! The whole poem has very a very pejorative tone and criticises society's view of death.
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    (Original post by 1234jan27)
    Hi! Is anyone else comparing Volpone & Blake?? I'm quite stuck here I know its close to the exam but anyone who can briefly share ideas would be great! Or anyone doing Blake, can you share anything about the presentation of women??
    Good luck guys!!
    For Blake and women I've looked at the 'Nurses Song's mainly, and then 'The Sick Rose' and 'Blossom' with regard to sexuality and the idea of sexual equality. Also 'The Little Black Boy' too, with the idea of mothers. Mainly maternal stuff and sexuality is what I've looked at with regard to gender. There's such conflicting criticism on Blake's views on women!!
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    Anyone doing marvell and volpone? Got any good links between them? thnx
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    For those doing the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, how are you revising for it? I'm kinda struggling for revision methods at the moment. I'm fine for King Lear as the themes are quite clear cut, but I'm struggling to find comparisons with the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, there seems to be thin common ground between them. Also, my teacher said you don't have to learn any critic quotes for section B, only section A. Is this true? Thanks for any help. Really want an A in this.
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    (Original post by Personification)
    For those doing the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, how are you revising for it? I'm kinda struggling for revision methods at the moment. I'm fine for King Lear as the themes are quite clear cut, but I'm struggling to find comparisons with the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, there seems to be thin common ground between them. Also, my teacher said you don't have to learn any critic quotes for section B, only section A. Is this true? Thanks for any help. Really want an A in this.
    A03 & 04 are the most heavy weighted on both Sec A and B. We got told that you don't necessarily have to quote on either but quoting shows an informed criticism rather than just saying "some critics would argue" or "a feminist reading would argue that..." I plan on quoting both but that's just because we have always been told that. It doesn't actually specify on the spec that you should be quoting critics, I don't think!
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    (Original post by Personification)
    For those doing the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, how are you revising for it? I'm kinda struggling for revision methods at the moment. I'm fine for King Lear as the themes are quite clear cut, but I'm struggling to find comparisons with the Wife of Bath and The Rivals, there seems to be thin common ground between them. Also, my teacher said you don't have to learn any critic quotes for section B, only section A. Is this true? Thanks for any help. Really want an A in this.
    Yeah the standard "a feminist reading might suggest ____" or "some critics may interpret this as____". If you can find a named critic, use one. Otherwise that will do you just fine.
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    Also any top tips for lear? Or Q's that people think will come up for King Lear?
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    Has anyone got good tips for getting the introductions and conclusions done as soon as possible? I end up spending a good ten minutes on them each.
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    (Original post by HighwayUnicorn)
    Has anyone got good tips for getting the introductions and conclusions done as soon as possible? I end up spending a good ten minutes on them each.
    On each?! If you're really struggling, write the main body of your essay first then come back to it. Some people find it difficult - I do. I have to write an introduction before I start the main body. Remember to keep it concise - that's essential - it's an introduction. It should contain your line of argument that you intend to stick to throughout your essay. If it's any consolation, since I've taken English it has never
    been clear what your intro/conclusion should contain. I suppose you just have to get to grips with it and it comes with practice. There isn't really a universal way of writing it (which makes it hard to explain )

    For your intro, answer the question straight away. E.g. if the question is 'consider ways in which the writers have portrayed women in __(a)__ and __(b)__', I'd say something along the lines of 'the role of women in the respective settings of the texts was very different to their role now. Despite their social standing, their role in the texts is crucial, albeit more so in __(a)__ than in __(b)__'. Something along those lines.

    For the conclusion, remember it isn't a summary - otherwise it would be pointless. It should almost be a continuation of you intro but explaining how it has been achieved, having expressed the ways it has in answering the question. For example, using the previous situation, I'd say something like: 'the role of women in both texts has been emphasised, considering they were very much viewed as the 'second sex'. In __(a)__, the writer has relied chiefly on the behaviour of [character] to express their power, but in __(b)__, focus more on language to convey their point'.

    Both your intro and conclusion shouldn't be more than 5 lines on A4. Hope that helped.
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    (Original post by Pavzky)
    On each?! If you're really struggling, write the main body of your essay first then come back to it. Some people find it difficult - I do. I have to write an introduction before I start the main body. Remember to keep it concise - that's essential - it's an introduction. It should contain your line of argument that you intend to stick to throughout your essay. If it's any consolation, since I've taken English it has never
    been clear what your intro/conclusion should contain. I suppose you just have to get to grips with it and it comes with practice. There isn't really a universal way of writing it (which makes it hard to explain )

    For your intro, answer the question straight away. E.g. if the question is 'consider ways in which the writers have portrayed women in __(a)__ and __(b)__', I'd say something along the lines of 'the role of women in the respective settings of the texts was very different to their role now. Despite their social standing, their role in the texts is crucial, albeit more so in __(a)__ than in __(b)__'. Something along those lines.

    For the conclusion, remember it isn't a summary - otherwise it would be pointless. It should almost be a continuation of you intro but explaining how it has been achieved, having expressed the ways it has in answering the question. For example, using the previous situation, I'd say something like: 'the role of women in both texts has been emphasised, considering they were very much viewed as the 'second sex'. In __(a)__, the writer has relied chiefly on the behaviour of [character] to express their power, but in __(b)__, focus more on language to convey their point'.

    Both your intro and conclusion shouldn't be more than 5 lines on A4. Hope that helped.
    Thanks! Honestly it's the part I find hardest to do in any essay and even the personal statements. It just seems to be the part that makes or breaks the essay for me
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    (Original post by HighwayUnicorn)
    Thanks! Honestly it's the part I find hardest to do in any essay and even the personal statements. It just seems to be the part that makes or breaks the essay for me
    No problem . I completely understand xD. The main benefit is that it ensures you're on the right track when you write your essay and that you've done so effectively when it comes to concluding. Oh well. Best of luck in your exam
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94SEV9YYwDU

    been in hermit, sorry for not being on skype, I hope this makes it up. Most of 'The White Devil' not a waste of two hours.
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    (Original post by liabhimani)
    paradise lost!!! what about you? it doesnt look like anyone else is comparing those two texts! (don't blame them). I've got nothing on plutarch, our teacher didn't even focus on that at all!!! arghhhh tell me about it- just learning quotations and critical quotations for AO2 and AO3! dreading this
    I don't actually have any critical quotes/views which worries me!!! I'm comparing volpone with Blake then a&c as the stand alone *super sad face*
 
 
 
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