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AS latin Cicero In Catilinam I...please help!!! watch

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    From lines 81-150 (Scylla's section) I have the following notes, all of which I have sort of made up myself on the spot, so don't take them as definitively correct at all .

    Lines 85-89:
    Ovid offers little aside commentaries in brackets "(heu facinus)" and "(tanta est fiducia meriti)" which clearly emphasise and embellish particularly emotive points to the reader, such as the (alas, wicked deed!).

    Lines 92-94: Scylla starts immediately with "praemia," clearly showing her selfish mindset. There is alliteration to some extent of p's and c's
    "praemia...peto...pignus...purpu reum...patria" and "cape...crinem...crinem...caput" , still working out exactly what that does though...

    Lines 105-110: Sudden transition for Scylla from eagerness/calm anticipation to rage. Clear physical rendering of extreme emotions "manus passis furibuna capillis"

    This is followed up by a series of repetitive rhetorical questions ("quo fugis...") showing Scylla's confused and incredibly angry mindset. The flurry of rhetorical questions almost could be said to reflect her frenzied mindset. Also the short sharp rhetorical question exclamations used by Ovid, such as "nam quo deserta revertar?" "In Patriam?"etc...

    Scylla's sudden shift is ironically presented as she insults Minos' lineage...Syrtis, Armenian tigresses etc...ironic when considering that before she had previously exalted Minos' parentage "si quae te peperit..." (line 49).

    Lines 126-128: More sudden sharp bursts of exclamation by Scylla, "exige poenas Nise Pater!" etc...really highlights her incredibly angry mindset.

    Line 138: "me miseram" another sharp exclamation...this time of extreme sorrow though. Her moods are clearly incredibly confused, constantly altering between rage, regret, sorrow, renewed desire for revenge...etc etc...

    Line 140: "meritorum oblite meorum" - assonance, repetition of similar ending, really serves to reinforce her point "you who forget my good services"

    Line 150: "pluma subit palmist" - emphasis on the transition/change of her to a bird, Ovid puts the central theme of his metamorphoses into focus.

    And that guys...is pretty much all I have at the moment. I'm constantly looking though and will share all I find. Remember this is just random crap I'm spouting out and is probably not 100% accurate...

    If you guys have got any other stuff, I'd love to know , please tell me!
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    I've only got a little bit to add:

    Line 91 : First time Scylla's name is actually mentioned, and it is when she is betraying her father and country. Suggesting her name can only be used in the context of betrayal and/or deceit.

    Line 95 : In terms of word positioning, Minos is in the middle : surrounded by Scylla's offering. This perhaps shows that for Scylla, everything revolves around Minos and/or she is suffocating him with her offerings.

    Hopefully by the end of the night, we will have accumulated enough points to suffice in the exam

    Likewise I will continue to look for stuff also, thanks for the help
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    (Original post by IngensPolyspaston)
    I've only got a little bit to add:

    Line 91 : First time Scylla's name is actually mentioned, and it is when she is betraying her father and country. Suggesting her name can only be used in the context of betrayal and/or deceit.

    Line 95 : In terms of word positioning, Minos is in the middle : surrounded by Scylla's offering. This perhaps shows that for Scylla, everything revolves around Minos and/or she is suffocating him with her offerings.

    Hopefully by the end of the night, we will have accumulated enough points to suffice in the exam

    Likewise I will continue to look for stuff also, thanks for the help
    Cheers .

    Another point I have found is that when Scylla robs her father Nisus of the lock (line 85), Ovid structures the sentence so that "daughter" is juxtaposed with "father" - "nata parentem," emphasising the wrongness and gravity of the crime.

    I might be wrong but the crime itself from lines 84-85 seems to be framed in the present tense so as to make it more intense and exciting for the reader.
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    (Original post by righteous)
    Cheers .

    Another point I have found is that when Scylla robs her father Nisus of the lock (line 85), Ovid structures the sentence so that "daughter" is juxtaposed with "father" - "nata parentem," emphasising the wrongness and gravity of the crime.

    I might be wrong but the crime itself from lines 84-85 seems to be framed in the present tense so as to make it more intense and exciting for the reader.
    Yes indeed. The brevity of that section, during which Scylla commits the unspeakable crime against her father and the fatherland, is striking as is the sense of vividness. You are therefore right to say that the use of the present tense, albeit not exclusive to this part, contributes to the immediacy of the action. You certainly should be able to give a good account of yourself on the 8 markers, where close reference to the Latin is required.
    The 10 markers are, I believe, more thematic. I think everyone will find those questions challenging, but, if anything, I tend to struggle more to justify any observations I have made on the literary device questions. Did Ovid intend some profound effect every time he used alliteration, hyperbole, or chiasmus? I am a keen English student, so I would hope to have a greater appreciation of these things and yet I cannot help but come to the conclusion that lively, interesting language is a virtue in itself.
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    (Original post by ESJWW)
    I am a keen English student, so I would hope to have a greater appreciation of these things and yet I cannot help but come to the conclusion that lively, interesting language is a virtue in itself.
    Being an English student, do you have any tips on how to do these questions? I'm useless at essay type questions, and its not even an essay really, I just call it that because 10 marks is the longest question I do in any of my subjects
 
 
 
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