Four Britons 'killed fighting in Syria war with Al Qaeda rebels' Watch

HokeyWolf
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#101
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#101
(Original post by Unruly Marmite)
The problem I see is that the Army remained just about loyal to Assad. Unlike, say, Libya, where much of the, admittedly fairly low quality Army joined the rebels, I saw somewhere that Assad had something like 200,000 well trained, equipped and motivated troops, while the rebel deserter forces of the FSA numbered about 10,000. I don't know if this is correct- I read it a while ago on the BBC website- but if it is then it makes a case against intervention all by itself.
Very good point. Also regional support for Assad- Iran, Hezbollah, and Russia has meant he has had a solid, reliable supply of weapons and well trained troops as well as maintaining International credibility. Iran and Russia are two powerful regional and International actors that have certainly influenced the case for intervention. I would also like to add here that I believe the Israeli strikes against Assad forces have been token and entirely selfish, aimed at taking out weapons bound for Hezbollah. This has proven that Syrian air defense systems aren't as threatening as Russia would have us believe?
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Unruly Marmite
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#102
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#102
That might be a point, but as well I think that it might be more to do with the fact that the strikes have been small scale. I mean, two or three fast moving jets are going to be harder to hit than a full bomber force. I think Russia is probably exaggerating Assads capabilities, but his armed forces are still formidable- enough to give most nations pause, I would think, and with Iran and Russia to back him up international intervention isn't really going anywhere. I think the best hope for the rebels is to try to win by guerrilla tactics, just harass him until he gives up and negotiates. Then maybe they could form their own free nation.
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~scorpio~
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#103
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#103
(Original post by YouAreAllPotty)
It isn't the truth that hurts, it's the pottiness that does.
Ah, good old Nato, a very reliable source of information about Arabs and Muslims, the very people they've been waging a war against. You're the pottiest person here, I think.
Yes, the Syrian army is doing an excellent job of making straight for hellfire, may they rot in its deepest pit for all eternity for murdering these terrorists:
Give me a reliable source that states the majority of the Syrians in Syria are pro rebels? You will find none but I challenge you. Most of the Syrians in Syria cherish their leader, this is a fact. Even the Sunnis make up most of the Syrian Army and they are all loyal to Assad. Only the Syrians can decide the future of Syria, there is an election running in 2014.



Any sane person would prefer Assad over the backward terrorists AlQaeda scums who want to annihilate all Shias, Allawites, Christians and the rest of the ethnic minority groups and want to establish a modern day ummayad dynasty. Assad is the only person that can lead Syria into a stable future and repair the damage in the short term!

and please, the army only target the rebels not innocent civilians, only last week members of the so called fsa beheaded a fellow fighter, they are sub human savages, may they rot in hell! Syian Army are fighting for our survival and they are giving the rebels a good a** whooping
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Pastaferian
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#104
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#104
(Original post by HokeyWolf)
Good thoughts. I read an article in FP a few months back that suggested that the country has already split into 3 distinct areas. Southern Syria (minus a few enclaves of rebel positions in and around Damascus) is regime controlled. Some Northern and North Eastern areas up towards the eastern border with Turkey are controlled by Kurdish forces (perhaps forging a Kurdish state in north eastern Syria alongside the Kurdish areas in northern Iraq. The rest of the north of the country is dominated by either 'FSA' (whatever that means anymore) or ISIS/ Al Qaeda backed forces. Perhaps this could be a model for the restructuring of the country. Whatever happens, I believe that too much blood has been split on all sides of this conflict for the nation to simmer back down to historic levels of co-habitation, but we will see...
I think it's more complicated than that. This map is a couple of months old, but gives an idea of how complex the situation on the ground is...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22798391
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arkhamz
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#105
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#105
Wow, what a terrible loss ;_; :rolleyes:
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Reform
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#106
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#106
(Original post by Pastaferian)
I think it's more complicated than that. This map is a couple of months old, but gives an idea of how complex the situation on the ground is...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22798391

...
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Enoxial
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#107
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#107
(Original post by originaltitle)
Jesus, you're such a bloodthirsty villain.
I'm not a vampire :facepalm:

(Original post by originaltitle)
Al-Qaeda has all the right in the world to step in.
Who died and made them world police?
Tell me this, why don't they go fight Israel then? Or Egypt?

(Original post by originaltitle)
They've made it very clear that they're fighting for the Muslims,
Please quote the Hadeeth which says its good to suicide and kill 20 people along with you. :rolleyes:
Hadeeth from any sect will do good.

(Original post by originaltitle)
and Islam has no borders.
The people living near the places they were born wont even consider them as muslims (sunni or shia), go ask them, I have...

(Original post by originaltitle)
You deal with double standards. You support the Shias of Bahrain and their uprising but when the Syrians stage an uprising against their government you bring in all sorts of hokum into the debate.
I NEVER said that Shias in Bahrain should be supported while Syria should be neglected.

I said if your going to remove Assad then remove Hamad as well!

(Original post by originaltitle)
100,000+ people are supposed to have died in Syria. No where near that number of Shias has died in Bahrain.
100,000+ died only because terrorist invaded Syria to 'help'.
Only some one deluded would think the foreign rebels coming in has nothing to do with 100,000 deaths.
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Enoxial
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#108
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#108
(Original post by PopaPork)
My partner is a Muslim who's parents had to flee their own country because of being the wrong sort of Muslim.
I'm sorry for hear that.
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Enoxial
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Al-Mudaari)
Instead of showing off your teeth why don't you take part in the debate?
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PopaPork
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#110
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#110
(Original post by Enoxial)
I'm sorry for hear that.
Thanks

They are angry at the way the government has side lined people like them who just want to be left to practice their faith in peace rather than force it down other people throats.

They are also angry at their fellow Muslims specifically the parents of 'extremists' who are unwilling to explain why they faith failed them and their communities in the first place forcing many of them to seek a better life for them and their children only for them to try and recreate the same issues here.
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Enoxial
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#111
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#111
(Original post by PopaPork)
Thanks

They are angry at the way the government has side lined people like them who just want to be left to practice their faith in peace rather than force it down other people throats.

They are also angry at their fellow Muslims specifically the parents of 'extremists' who are unwilling to explain why they faith failed them and their communities in the first place forcing many of them to seek a better life for them and their children only for them to try and recreate the same issues here.
At least they are having a better life here.
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Enoxial
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#112
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#112
(Original post by YouAreAllPotty)
That isn't a fact, you're absolutely potty and your reasoning is pottier than you and your fact are. He hasn't fallen because America hasn't snapped its fingers for that yet. He will fall as soon as the cannibals and savages of Al Queda are wiped out.
Just like they snapped their fingers to stop the Iranian Revolution..? Oh wait.. they failed actually.
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Al-Mudaari
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#113
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#113
(Original post by Enoxial)
Instead of showing off your teeth why don't you take part in the debate?
There is no debate here.

Nor is anyone that stupid enough (those who have even the slightest of idea's) to waste their time arguing whether "most Syrians support Assad or not".
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Enoxial
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#114
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#114
(Original post by Al-Mudaari)
There is no debate here.

Nor is anyone that stupid enough (those who have even the slightest of idea's) to waste their time arguing whether "most Syrians support Assad or not".
Pls Answer: Do you think the Al-Qaeda will do a better job in Syria?
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HokeyWolf
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Enoxial)
Pls Answer: Do you think the Al-Qaeda will do a better job in Syria?
While i'm not for a minute suggesting that Al Qaeda have the capacity or moral grounding to rule anywhere, I will suggest that Assad is primarily responsible for the radicalization, sectarianization and longevity of the Syrian conflict. Syria will not be stable with a Assad led government in charge in the future. Protests against his rule and the subsequent violent crackdowns against the majority using Alawite militia and armed groups drove a wedge between ethnic groups in the country caused the fracturing of Syria along religious and ethnic grounds.
Further, could it not be argued that Assad's increasing reliance on Lebanese, Iranian and reportedly North Korean manpower, and the focused attacks on civilian areas is as much a shift towards impunity and the utilization of 3rd Force terror tactics as the rebels 'using' Al Qaeda?
Just to add, to generalize the 'Rebels' and Al Qaeda under the same flag is totally a mis-representation. There are still rebels fighting for democracy and self government as much as there are rebels fighting for an Islamic Caliphate spanning the Caucuses (links to Chechnya and Dagastan etc).
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Al-Mudaari
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#116
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#116
(Original post by Enoxial)
Pls Answer: Do you think the Al-Qaeda will do a better job in Syria?
If you want to compare them with Assad (or Rafidi/Alawite), then no doubt, AQ are much much better. Last time I checked, they were actually doing pretty decent job in some parts of Yemen.
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Enoxial
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#117
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#117
(Original post by Al-Mudaari)
If you want to compare them with Assad (or Rafidi/Alawite), then no doubt, AQ are much much better. Last time I checked, they were actually doing pretty decent job in some parts of Yemen.
Last time I checked they did a poor job in Afghanistan and Iraq.
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Enoxial
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#118
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#118
(Original post by HokeyWolf)
While i'm not for a minute suggesting that Al Qaeda have the capacity or moral grounding to rule anywhere, I will suggest that Assad is primarily responsible for the radicalization, sectarianization and longevity of the Syrian conflict. Syria will not be stable with a Assad led government in charge in the future. Protests against his rule and the subsequent violent crackdowns against the majority using Alawite militia and armed groups drove a wedge between ethnic groups in the country caused the fracturing of Syria along religious and ethnic grounds.
The damage is mainly due to Foreign Intervention imo.
Did Iran or Hezbollah intervene in Bahrain?

(Original post by HokeyWolf)
Just to add, to generalize the 'Rebels' and Al Qaeda under the same flag is totally a mis-representation.
Al Qaeda are mostly dominant and moderate rebels can't do anything about that.

(Original post by HokeyWolf)
There are still rebels fighting for democracy and self government as much as there are rebels fighting for an Islamic Caliphate spanning the Caucuses (links to Chechnya and Dagastan etc).
Shouldn't the Al-Qaeda seize Madinah to start the Caliphate seeing as how the first Caliph was elected in Hijaz.

May I ask what plans have they revealed to bring back the Caliphate? :rolleyes:
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HokeyWolf
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#119
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#119
(Original post by Enoxial)
The damage is mainly due to Foreign Intervention imo.
Did Iran or Hezbollah intervene in Bahrain?



Al Qaeda are mostly dominant and moderate rebels can't do anything about that.



Shouldn't the Al-Qaeda seize Madinah to start the Caliphate seeing as how the first Caliph was elected in Hijaz.

May I ask what plans have they revealed to bring back the Caliphate? :rolleyes:
First point, we aren't talking about Bahrain, there is a huge thread for that. The violence is Assads sole responsibility. And as I pointed out, when all this started back in 2011, Assad was the force primarily responsible for the bloodshed; the man is a war criminal in the truest sense of the word. The FSA and its disparate affiliate groups formed to protect demonstrators from being targeting and defend areas of dissent. While the FSA and moderate groups are loosing ground to Al Qaeda militants, they still exist and should not be forgotten by the West. They need and deserve our support (financial, moral and military) and our admiration. Second point, got any proof? There are still a huge amount of people who stand against the regime that aren't aligned with extremest groups, IE the numerous un-unified groups meeting in Geneva in January. and Thirdly, it was a suggestion, as I outlined at the top. plus...
http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-369448.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calipha...ws_of_al-Qaeda
Something about a Caliphate spanning the same ground as the Ottomans? From the Caucasus to the Indian Ocean.
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