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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    Of course, I forgot about that well known fiscal policy of spending £10 million on a old woman's funeral to stimulate the economy.

    :confused:
    Ah finally we're getting somewhere.

    Well it's not just an old woman's funeral is it. The average old woman's funeral is going to generate £1k-£2k in extra spending and only has a very short term benefit.

    If 100k people went to London on Wednesday specifically for this event and spent £50 on average (transport, food, memorabilia, tourism etc), we've already made £5million back.

    This event will essentially be a big advert for Britain and will appear on many international news networks. The extra tourist revenue that could generate alone is worth millions. It doesn't take that many random Americans seeing it on the news and thinking 'hey lets go to England this summer!' before you're getting millions extra pumped into the British economy.

    There are many other smaller benefits I could go into, my main point being that we're not really paying £10m for this and I'd estimate there is a good chance we as a country end up making a few million from this.

    So, calm down, let people pay their respects if they want to. Let others protest if they want to. It's all good my friends.
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    (Original post by ArtGoblin)
    Even if the funeral does cause an extra £10 million worth of spending, it's not really generating money in the economy. That £10 million would probably only be spent on other things so it's not an investment at all.
    Sure, you're right people would indeed just spend their money on other things.

    But this would help them to spend their disposable income faster and play a small part in getting the economy moving.

    Imagine all the old 60-year old middle class Tories with 6-figures in the bank. They're just sitting on their money. Maybe they'll come down to London for a few days and spend £300. That £300 will circulate around the economy and play a tiny role to achieve growth.

    But yes, you make a good point. Still, I think there's a good chance we make our £10m back.
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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    It'd be much cheaper for the Thatchers to pay for the funeral.

    I'm sure she was worth £9 million when she died.

    A private and much smaller funeral PAID FOR BY THE THATCHERS would be much more appropriate.

    Thatcher also stipulated that wanted the prime minister of the day to speak at her funeral. What a joke.

    A truly disgusting use of public money and whether you lean to the left or the right you surely must see that.
    The Thatchers will be making a small contribution, but yes, the government will pay the lions share.

    Why should the Thatchers pay when the state wants to honour one of its citizens, or refuse the honour?

    Should OBEs, CBEs, MBEs etc be made to pay for their own medals too?
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    Reminds me of when they built that £1 million statue of Reagan. My idea of building it out of Play-Doo to reduce costs didn't slide it seems. :sad:
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    This all sounds a bit like 'The wealth will trickle down'.

    Misleading and untrue.
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    Times of austerity eh?

    I don't think you could possibly think of a worse way to spend £10M. We might as well have given £10M to North Korea.
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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    This all sounds a bit like 'The wealth will trickle down'.

    Misleading and untrue.
    You've have completely mis-understood. Open your economics text book and look at the circular flow, this is not the government giving wealth to those with the ability to distribute capital to create employment, this is the government spending on an event (the event output ), the event is expected to create more output within the economy, as that spending is passed on. This is the bedrock of Keynesian economics. The point is that the spending on the funeral will not cost 10m in the long run, the output created from the long run will be taxed, thus returning revenue to the government.
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    (Original post by miser)
    £10 million on a funeral. It's called austerity.
    It won't cost 10m in the long run however.
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    (Original post by Thriftworks)
    You've have completely mis-understood. Open your economics text book and look at the circular flow, this is not the government giving wealth to those with the ability to distribute capital to create employment, this is the government spending on an event (the event output ), the event is expected to create more output within the economy, as that spending is passed on. This is the bedrock of Keynesian economics. The point is that the spending on the funeral will not cost 10m in the long run, the output created from the long run will be taxed, thus returning revenue to the government.
    I'm really glad you mentioned that. Your logic has at least made me laugh it is so pathetic.

    What other Keynesian economic policies have this government used?

    This is just a big send off for a Tory hero and it truly sickens me that people are trying to portray it as actually helping the country.

    I'm starting to wish for serious disorder on Wednesday.
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    (Original post by Thriftworks)
    You've have completely mis-understood. Open your economics text book and look at the circular flow, this is not the government giving wealth to those with the ability to distribute capital to create employment, this is the government spending on an event (the event output ), the event is expected to create more output within the economy, as that spending is passed on. This is the bedrock of Keynesian economics. The point is that the spending on the funeral will not cost 10m in the long run, the output created from the long run will be taxed, thus returning revenue to the government.
    Ah like the Royal wedding you mean?

    http://politicalscrapbook.net/2011/0...dding-economy/
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    (Original post by n00)
    Ah like the Royal wedding you mean?

    http://politicalscrapbook.net/2011/0...dding-economy/
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/ap...-tourism-boost
    Royal wedding was a bank holiday the funeral will not be, thus your point is rendered invalid.tc
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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    I'm really glad you mentioned that. Your logic has at least made me laugh it is so pathetic.

    What other Keynesian economic policies have this government used?

    This is just a big send off for a Tory hero and it truly sickens me that people are trying to portray it as actually helping the country.

    I'm starting to wish for serious disorder on Wednesday.
    You fail to point out these 'flaws' you speak of. You have presented no argument, whilst the government hasn't widely practiced Keynesian economics, programs such as HS2 are clear examples of Keynesian policies being used, besides this is besides the point as the logic behind the original argument still stands.
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    (Original post by Mycroft Holmes)
    I thought Thatcher herself said that she didn't want a state funeral? Why is she getting one when people were adamant on the day she died that she wasn't getting one?
    No. She said she didn't want to lie in state. I think she was quite prepared for full honours.

    <3 x
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    i wish i was important enough to have a state funeral
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    (Original post by Thriftworks)
    You've have completely mis-understood. Open your economics text book and look at the circular flow, this is not the government giving wealth to those with the ability to distribute capital to create employment, this is the government spending on an event (the event output ), the event is expected to create more output within the economy, as that spending is passed on. This is the bedrock of Keynesian economics. The point is that the spending on the funeral will not cost 10m in the long run, the output created from the long run will be taxed, thus returning revenue to the government.
    If this is the case why are they cutting jobs and making people redudant.
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    (Original post by loversh)
    If this is the case why are they cutting jobs and making people redudant.
    Because that has nothing to do with holding events that are economically beneficial?
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    Sling her down one of the empty mines that mark her legacy. She'd like that.
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    I think what a lot of people forget is that an awful lot of that money is not spent directly on the funeral itself, but on protecting all the crowds who turn up. At a funeral of any prominent person, no matter how grand the actual event is, those costs are inevitable.

    (Original post by Heidihi7894)
    She wouldn't have wanted this funeral, but people can at least stop complaining about the cost.
    On the contrary: she organised it.
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    ****ing ridiculous that anyone assosciated with Labour tuned up, let alone Miliband.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I think what a lot of people forget is that an awful lot of that money is not spent directly on the funeral itself, but on protecting all the crowds who turn up. At a funeral of any prominent person, no matter how grand the actual event is, those costs are inevitable.



    On the contrary: she organised it.

    Most sensible people plan their funeral. It would be interesting to see what the policing bill would've been for just a private funeral with that many VIPs attending and members of the public attending. If you take that bill, from this bill I suspect you'll find that its not that much different.

    I understand that she was a divisive politician, but I'm sensing these demonstrators are just alienating their cause even further. It's not until times like this that you realise they're just a vocal minority in the first place
 
 
 
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